By on August 10, 2012

There goes the prestige

Rarely do Dan Akerson, the CEO of GM, and TTAC see eye to eye. This time, they do. Two weeks ago, we complained that GM is leaking like a scuttled steamer.  Yesterday,  Dan Akerson took the whole company to task: “We have to stop leaking in this company. It’s an act of treason — it really is,” Akerson said in an internal video conference with GM employees. The conference tape was promptly leaked to the Detroit News, and it contained more leaks.

After GM’s Chief Marketing Office Joel Ewanick was ousted under murky circumstances, the company officially threw dirt after him (“Failed to meet the expectations that the company has for its employees.”) Soon thereafter, Ewanick found himself under a barrage of leaks, each more childish than the other.  Akerson wants the leaking to stop. And while the former Navy officer is shoring up the ship, he leaks some more.

The Detroit News was “given access to a recording of the call” and says  that Akerson complained about

“a recent Bloomberg News report on the dismissal of marketing executive Joel Ewanick — over internal frictions and failure to disclose the full cost of a $559 million soccer deal — “was almost verbatim what happened. That is unfair to anybody whether you think he’s right, wrong or in-between.”

Well, thank you for leaking that  Bloomberg had it right. Now they don’t have to rely on “people familiar with the matter,” they have their confirmation right from the boss.

Akerson said employees would have to sign a document called “Winning With Integrity.”

A GM spokeswoman promptly told the Detroit News “that the document is not new, and that employees have had had to sign a compliance form for at least 10 years.”

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

67 Comments on “Loose Lips Sink Ships: Akerson Stops Leaks, Starts New Ones...”


  • avatar
    Tosh

    WWI has a nice ring to it. Next will be Winning With Improved Integrity (WWII). Who needs a marketing wiz?

  • avatar
    juicy sushi

    An old idiom about locking barn doors and horses bolting is running through my head, but at this point the issue is just too far gone for me to even bother.

    Yes, the leaking is bad. Yes it needs to stop. I think though, that the poor GM corporate culture is so ingrained that short of firing 100% of the salaried staff and starting again from scratch, probably nothing will change it.

  • avatar
    go-away-GM

    All employees had to sign this thing. I did.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Obama must be shouting ‘same team!’ at the briefing when he hears that Ackerson is labeling leaking sensitive information as being treason. Hilarious.

  • avatar
    C170guy

    Very surprised that it was verbatim. I had serious doubts, anyway.

    After the ouster, I made a point to watch some major networks advertising to see if I could spot a Chevy ad.
    CBS.com lays them on thick they are repeated and inescapable.

    Two struck me as awful, one with a caterwauling woman with a guitar,(bring ear protection/mute button for that one, it’s that bad) and a second ad in which a supposed Chevy driver is not bright enough to figure out how to put gas in the car, and you should buy a Chevy and be that stupid, too. I was shocked at the underlying message.

    “Fired? No wonder!” I said, even though it’s supposedly not how things went. If anything my assumption was that GM is letting these continue to air since they show fingerprints of a former employee, and that people would make the connection. I could be wrong though.

    • 0 avatar
      Slab

      I rarely watch live TV, so I catch up on Hulu quite often. Chevy has a big presence, and their ads are invariably awful. My most hated: the old folks yelling at each other (“Eco, eco, eco”) and the son picking up his parents at the airport (“That’s hippy talk”). And then they have Tim Allen as a spokesman. Really? Who the heck is their target market?

  • avatar
    oboylepr

    A GM CEO talking about integrity, that’s a laugh. Where is the integrity in selling steaming piles of shite to the public for 40 years while claiming they were cars. As one of the commentators at the end of the article says,’the best thing about GM is there isn’t one in my driveway’!

    • 0 avatar
      go-away-GM

      A CEO of that rotting corpse talking about integrity on any level is beyond comical. In fact, it is quite sad. Lt. Dan has an insurmountable task in changing GM. It is just not going to happen with out radical change; like firing EVERYONE and starting over. GM is on a collision course with the train again. It is only a matter of time.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      GM has made plenty good cars.

      You have to remember, for every Pontiac Aztek in the world, there’s a Toyota Yaris.

      • 0 avatar
        oboylepr

        For every Pontiac Aztec in the world, there are 100,000 Yarissss! What does that tell you?

      • 0 avatar
        tuffjuff

        I wasn’t comparing sales of an SUV to a B segment compact LITERALLY. I was making the point that all car makers make a crappy, ugly, not very good vehicle every now and then.

        What am I saying? This thread is shit-all-over-GM zone. Intelligence and common freaking sense have no place, here.

  • avatar
    go-away-GM

    “”We’re a global company that operates as small, little fiefdoms. That’s got to stop.”
    This quote from Lt. Dan touches on one of the major problems inside GM. Until all the “little fiefdoms” are broken apart the corporation is doomed.
    Remember, for all the pomp and circumstance about “change” on the board and at the highest executive levels, NOTHING and NOBODY has changed at the Director and down. It is the same as it ever was.

    • 0 avatar
      schmitt trigger

      What happened to: “Whatever is good for general Motors is good for the United States”

      Before anyone flames me, I’m quoting this tongue in cheek…

      • 0 avatar

        Actually, you’re misquoting the original. “for years I thought what was good for the country was good for General Motors and vice versa”. It was Charlie Wilson who said it during hearings to confirm him as Sec. of Defense for Pres. Eisenhower. It was in response to a question whether his holdings in GM would affect his decisions as defense secy. It’s usually quoted the way you had it, I’m guessing, because it makes it look like Wilson was putting GM ahead of his country. Wilson, a patriot who managed military production by American industry during WWII, I think, put things in proper order and perspective.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      I agree they needed to have a more extensive change than just the CEO and board members from 2008-2009 era.
      It seems Akerson has identified some of the important issues, whether he can change them is the question. But identifying them is a good start.
      I don`t know if it is fair to say he started new leaks since he was on a internal video conference and was speaking to staff. Someone leaked it, that happens with poor morale.

      • 0 avatar
        go-away-GM

        WIth a place as big and as vast as GM (Ackerson admitted they don’t even know everyone who works for GM or where they work!!!!), Ackerson knew his statements would get out.
        This is Ackerson in his last gasp effort to right the ship, so to speak. It is not going to happen with taking everything down.
        NEVER EVER UNDERESTIMATE the strength of those long established fiefdoms and their reluctance to do ANYTHING but continue the status quo.

        I firmly believe we have just seen the public beginnings of the end of the first stage of the the “new GM”.

      • 0 avatar
        tuffjuff

        Man, th is “go-away-GM” guy sure is BH.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      I work for a fairly large organization that’s divided into many small fiefdoms. Management is trying to change that, but it’s hard, expensive, and scary as hell for everybody, and we’re nowhere near the size of GM. I agree Akerson hasn’t done nearly enough, but it will take a miracle worker to straighten out GM. I guess my point is that while criticism is certainly warranted, let’s not pretend that his task is anything less than Herculean.

  • avatar

    So, Akerson compares leaking to treason, especially if the leaks are accurate. He then confirms that he somehow didn’t have oversight of a $600m deal, and had to fire Ewanick as a result. Then he busts out the “change agent” and “culture” talk that was used to hail Ewanick’s hiring, and goes on to admit that his “fortress balance sheet” still has a tiny pension problem, and the company’s technology is woefully out of date. Then the whole thing is leaked to the DetN.

    To paraphrase Woody Allen, this thing is turning into a parody of a mockery of a farce. I’ve been trying to give Akerson the benefit of the doubt, but this is definitive proof that he’s not in control of his company, morale is in the toilet, and his credibility is all used up. The last thing GM probably needs is more executive churn, but it’s time for a change.

    • 0 avatar
      go-away-GM

      GM has been a mockery of a farce for quite a while. It is going to get worse, much worse, before it gets better. It seems we are now seeing the thing unravel.
      Ackerson is done. This was his last shot. He will be gone by Chrismas.

      You have no idea how far into the toilet morale really is. I believe ever person inside GM is clinically depressed. I really do.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      You’re assuming that the “leak” was not something that Akerson wanted, when this may be his way of trying to shake the tree.

      He’s right about the problem with fiefdoms. I have no doubt that there are cultural issues within GM that can be turned about as quickly as an aircraft carrier.

      But this story makes him sound like a control freak, which isn’t necessarily an improvement. He seems intent on centralizing authority, which is difficult in a company with the size and geographic dispersion of a multinational corporation.

      He was a naval officer, and it now sounds as if he sees himself as being the admiral of General Motors. But the absolute hierarchy model that is used by the military does not translate well to running a private sector corporation. If he wants respect inside the company, then he’ll have to earn it; having the stripes on his uniform won’t be enough.

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        That’s insulting to aircraft carriers. They can haul ass when needed and can be intimidating. Ackerson was a Lieutenant when he resigned, O-3 Captain for the rest of the branches. He hasn’t figured out the Admiral doesn’t run a battle group by himself or that a Captain doesn’t run a ship by himself. He also hasn’t figured out the Captain is responsible for everything and everybody on the ship. Blaming Lieutenants won’t cut it.

    • 0 avatar

      +1

      “He then confirms that he somehow didn’t have oversight of a $600m deal, and had to fire Ewanick as a result.”

      This one choice contradicts one of the central hallmarks of a high reliability organization: Failure should be seen as an opportunity to learn, not an opportunity to lay blame and knee-jerk. Of course, then GM went ahead with the deal, anyway.

      Backing up one layer, though – making his choice to take action against Ewanick, Akerson solidified the need for a guerilla mindset among his executive team. “Just look at what happened to Ewanick!”

      Not the best way to spur honest communication, innovation or to stop the leaking or right the ship.

      This is getting good. I’m making popcorn.

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      ‘didn’t have oversight of a $600m deal’

      Ewanick lied about it and was fired. He probably had a level of spend that doesn’t require CEO approval if its within his budget.

      Apparently, for reasons unknown, Ewanick took smaller pieces of various budgets to stay under a dollar amount needed for total approval. When he was questioned about it, he lied again apparently.

      Not saying its a smooth ship…but how can Akerson account for an exec taking these actions and lying about it? Its not like every damn sponsorship around the world should have to be line item approved by the CEO. That’s what a CMO is supposed to do…and he, for whatever reason, was deceptive about it and got fired as soon as the truth came out.

      Its ironic that some say he’s too much of a micromanager yet when he allows his CMO to go out there a strike some deals…that CMO does some very odd things.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “Its ironic that some say he’s too much of a micromanager yet when he allows his CMO to go out there a strike some deals…that CMO does some very odd things.”

        You have to be rather naive to believe that this is how it went down.

        If GM didn’t like the Man U deal, then they would not have moved ahead with it. Actions speak louder than words, and GM’s actions are screaming out in a very loud voice that they were in wholehearted agreement with this deal.

        This is more of a matter of PR damage control gone awry. Since they publicly badmouthed Ewanik, GM then felt the need to double down by manufacturing a half-hearted explanation that won’t be accepted by anyone who understands corporate politics and who isn’t a diehard GM fan.

        Had they not trash talked him, we wouldn’t be treated to all of these bogus rationalizations. They could have just parted ways, but no, GM decided to shoot its mouth off instead of being polite, as they should have been.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        Reread the Bloomberg article….are you saying that version of the story is wrong? Part of Ackerson’s bitch was that the leak to Bloomberg got the story ‘exactly’ right…was the leak of the conversation of the leak actually another planned leak to throw off the discussion of the orignal leak?

        http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-08-08/gm-soccer-deal-whistle-blower-said-to-bring-down-ewanick-cars.html

        Ignore the irrelevant furniture and curse word discussion.

        They like the idea of being with Man U…thus finalizing the deal after Ewanick left/was fired. They didn’t like their CMO not disclosing as much as a third of the cost of the deal for whatever reason. Are you saying this didn’t happen?

        After he left/was fired:

        ‘As a result of the probe, parts of the arrangement originally put together under Ewanick were revised for less money, people said’

        Nobody ever said they didn’t want the Man U deal…for whatever reason, Ewanick didn’t handle it right. You want to think it was poor financial controls by the CEO and board…I think it was a reckless CMO who got caught. I do wonder if we’ll ever hear Ewanick’s side of the story…doubt we will.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “are you saying that version of the story is wrong?”

        I thought that I was being pretty clear.

        How’s this for clarity: Akerson is lying. They’re pitching this bogus Man U story in order to publicly justify Ewanick’s termination.

        Had they just fired Ewanik politely, as is usually the case in Corporate America, then that would have been that. But since they arguably committed slander, now they need to have a story in anticipation of a possible lawsuit.

        A credible explanation wasn’t apparently available. So we ended up with this one, instead.

        All this should make you wonder why the GM management team is acting in such a petty fashion. It’s one thing to fire a guy, it’s another thing to attempt to destroy his reputation in the newspaper. This was poorly executed, irrespective of whether or not Ewanik deserved to be fired.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        So, Ackerson is the unnamed source(s) for the Bloomberg article and/or got the leakers to tell his version of the story?

        So, they make up a lie to help against a potential slander lawsuit? Ackerson strikes me as a lot of things…but not as a liar.

  • avatar
    go-away-GM

    “powertrain technology is not competitive.”
    It astounds me that it took him nearly 2 years to make this statement. Remarkable.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      See, but it’s pick-and-choose.

      The 3.6 is a great engine. The LS3 and LS7 are also great.

      Then you get to something like the 2.4 Ecotec, which doesn’t put out much more than my 2.0 Duratec, despite being larger, or the new 2.5 with DI that puts out less power than the 2.4 with DI Hyundai has been using. THEN we’ve got the 3.0 that on paper looks excellent, but in the real world is a pile of garbage, whereas Hyundai’s new 3.3 is similar in concept but much, much better in execution.

      I never thought we’d see the day when Hyundai was leading the charge in powertrain development.

      Also, if only GM could make a GOOD small 6 to put in CUV’s like the Equinox, to replace the 2.4. It’s adequate, but that’s about it.

  • avatar
    mikey

    @go-away GM, and oboylepr…Do the former contract workers have to follow the same rules?

  • avatar
    go-away-GM

    refering to PBGC and pension plan gnerally:
    “They’re technically (in) bankruptcy. They aren’t there for you,” Akerson said. “We have to fix our pension plans ourselves.”

    Unless, of course, you are in the UAW. In that case the American taxpayer will transfer equity in the “new GM” to your pension.
    What a pile.
    Ackerson has lost his mind.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Was he factually incorrect? I don`t know the PBGC accounts.

      • 0 avatar
        go-away-GM

        Yes. Ackerson is correct about the PBGC. Did I say he was not?

        The irony is that he states GM must fix the SALARIED pension plan “ourselves” by “selling” the obligations to a third party annuity. How long before Prudential dumps it? Not long.
        Yet, the taxpayers can fix the HOURLY pension. There is no “ourselves” there. Even the Detroit News pickups up on the hypocrisy:

        “He said GM can’t put those decisions off. “Pension risk is something that we must resolve if we want this stock to break out,” Akerson said.

        GM hasn’t made any changes to its hourly pension plan.”

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        I don`t know the ins and out as as well as you (or others) do so I ask out of genuine curiosity. By selling the obligations to another company hasn`t GM taken some steps to fix the pension liability? Having a pension shortfall is not unique to GM either.

        My previous comment was in response to the “Akerson has lost his mind” statement. Hence my confusion if he was actually correct or not.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        PPGC? ….Is that a pension insurance fund? I’m from Canada, we don’t have such a thing federaly. I think the provinces run one ?

        The Ontario fund couldn’t carry GM retirees.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        GM has made lots of changes to its hourly pension plan,at least in Canada it has.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        The Go Away dude doesn’t really get it.

        GM sold off the salaried pension liability to Prudential, in order to move it off of GM’s balance sheet.

        GM would probably love to do the same thing with the hourly workers, but the union would have to agree to it.

        Akerson is using the PBGC as a fall guy. It’s plain and simple — by removing the liabilities from GM’s balance sheet, GM ends up with a stronger balance sheet. Akerson cares more about the company’s balance sheet than the retirement futures of his workers.

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      ‘Akerson cares more about the company’s balance sheet than the retirement futures of his workers.’

      Its about time they had someone in charge who felt the same way…that’s the way most other companies operate….especially if people really want the stock price to increase to help re-coup the bailout costs.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        @sunridge place….Your right,thats the way it is these days. Right now, organized labour,and unions in general, are on the ropes.

        History, has a way of repeating itself.

        Todays attitude, will help tomorrows unions make a come back.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        Blame Wall Street. Not like GM is the first company to try and get out of some pension obligations. Our world is filled with products for sale from companies who have done the same thing.

        I do find it interesting that the two most profitable car companies in the world (Toyota and VW) are based in countries a lot more ‘liberal’ than the US as far as workers rights, government run healthcare etc. Gee…is it possible that the obligations the US puts on the companies that operate in this country can make it hard to compete with companies that have the majority of their workers in countries with Government run healthcare and pensions?

        But, I digress….

  • avatar
    oboylepr

    Mikey,

    Can’t speak for GM contract workers, never was one so I don’t know.

  • avatar
    rnc

    John Krenicki is available and young, once again just suggesting the GM’s board look into making a change before the ship springs leaks that can’t be plugged and pumps can’t handle

  • avatar

    Oh Danny Boy, if only you would listen to your friendly Buickman…

    what would a guy who has retailed over 25,000 new GM vehicles know anyway? I’ll take you back to 25% market share in 6 months, guaranteed. won’t be waiting for your call as you fellas think you have all the answers, but you do not.

    Buickman
    Founder
    http://www.GeneralWatch.com

  • avatar
    sunridge place

    Wow, I think I saw an infomercial last night with similar claims…let me guess…it won’t cost a penny too!?!?!?

    A car salesman based in Michigan (in a town nicknamed Buick Town) selling a lot of Buicks at set prices to GM Employees and their family members is the leading Buick salesman in the country….how shocking

    • 0 avatar

      typical criticism. you must work for GM. if you had any sense you’d read Return to Greatness before spouting off. what have you accomplished? c’mon let’s here it kiddo.

      here’s one of many references regarding your friendly Buickman. what do you have there sunridge? Jack I suppose. stay in the shallow end kid!

      I took on Red Ink Rick and the Board of Bystanders while you played on your mom’s computer.

      http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2009/10/general-motors-zombie-watch-18-hire-buickman/

      Buickman
      Founder
      http://www.GeneralWatch.com

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        Relax..I was kind of joking. Wouldn’t you agree that selling vehicles in Michigan with Employee Pricing/Leasing in most deals is a bit different than, say, selling Buicks in LA or Boston?

        I’ve read a lot of your stuff…one of the funniest things I’ve read was your explanation about the frustration about changing GM incentives…something about needing an abacus and putting a deal together only to wake up the next day to find everything changed.

        No, I don’t work for GM.

      • 0 avatar

        actually having 6 large local Buick dealers and hundreds of salespeople makes the competition more challenging than you might suspect.

        I have been at this sales game for over 40 years and have the knowledge, expertise, and desire to make it happen. trouble is they won’t listen. not John Smith, Bill Lovejoy (tho he did use my Keep America Rolling), not LaNaive, nor Docherty, nor Ewanick who I met many timnes but couldn’t get thru to, pompous ass IMO.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        ‘actually having 6 large local Buick dealers and hundreds of salespeople makes the competition more challenging than you might suspect’

        Cool, so you agree that GM had way too many dealers competing with each other before the reorganization and needed to downsize that number that so that dealerships could be more profitable.

  • avatar

    General Motors would best be served by giving the reins of VSSM to Eddie Peper. the man knows the business and is respected by the dealers.

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      Wasn’t Peper the head of Cadillac Sales for awhile…and didn’t they have the same ‘if you own this, you get that $$ and if you lease this, you get that $$’ that you hated?

      BTW…I found your rant that cracked me up so much a few years ago…brillant stuff.

      http://generalwatch.com/editorials/editorial.cfm?EdID=310

      Don’t the sales chiefs for the divisions report up through Reuss away from Ewanick (when he was there)?

      And, you admit that the incentive game isn’t as stupid as it was 5 years ago or so…

      Your words:

      ‘Mark Reuss has done great things, reversing dealer closures, stopping the insanity of almost daily changes to incentives, and refraining from a Memorial Day fire sale.’

      I have no doubt you’re a great salesman nor that you might have some decent ideas…but the whole ‘I was the #1 Buick Salesman in America’ really means I was the #1 Buick salesman in a small part of Michigan.

      I’ll betcha that San Antonio is the #1 market in Texas for Toyota pickup trucks. I’ll bet you there’s a really great salesman there too who is #1. Guess what, there’s a Tundra plant with 1000’s of employees directly or indirectly tied to Tundra sales…guess what kind of Trucks they buy?

      Now, put that sales guy in Dallas against F150/Silverado/Sierra/Ram and without thousands of people locally working at or near the plant?

      Do you think that salesguy could double market share in Dallas just because he’s that great?

      No.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    “Rarely do Dan Akerson, the CEO of GM, and TTAC see eye to eye.”

    Or….

    “Rarely do Dan Akerson, the CEO of GM, and Bertel Schmitt see eye to eye.”

  • avatar
    GS650G

    I thought GM built cars and trucks second to none, apparently their true business is managing the ebb and flow of millions of dollars here to there. And the taxpayers have a huge stake in this but not much say.

  • avatar
    carbiz

    How could it be otherwise? GM has gone from the world’s largest corporation (let alone auto company), a position it held for decades, to bankruptcy, shedding hundreds of thousands of jobs world-wide. This obviously leaves a long trail of disappointed/disgruntled ex-employees with axes to grind.
    Combine that with a dealer network that has been decimated in recent years (many of whom fled to the imports, taking years of marketing/service know-how with them, then throw in the fact so many GM dealers own import stores – well, it’s a recipe for divided loyalties at best, treason at worst.
    Personally, the entire franchise system sucks, in my opinion. When our General Manager (of a GM dealership) flew to Japan to receive an award for the success of one of their Toyota stores, I was disgusted. WTF? So GM has a private dealer rally, and half the audience owns Toyota/Mitsu/Honda/Mazda stores. Great.
    How the hell do you run a business with that kind of divided loyalty?
    Gus Stelzer, who retired from GM in 1976 was bang-on when he protested GM dealers buying up (then dirt cheap) import franchises in the 1960s. Undoubtedly, that played a major role in GM’s downfall.
    Loose lips? Far worse things have happened then that, I am sure.

  • avatar
    Terry

    Carbiz…where was GM’s loyalty when they were selling Toyotas, Suzukis, and Isuzus under the GEO banner in their Chevy stores? I’ll tell you where their loyalty lies–WITH THE MONEY. They will sell ANYTHING to make money, and why wouldnt they? Most of the general public these days feels no loyalty to GM, 2 generations of consumers have grown up on imports. Many of which were made in the USA.
    Outside of trucks, Camaros and Corvettes, most people under 50 years of age think of GM in the same way commedian David Brenner spoke of Denny’s restaurants: “Nobody goes to Denny’s, they END UP at Denny’s”

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Excellent point about the Geos. Mind you most of the cars involved were previously sold as Chevrolets, like the Nova, Spectrum, and Sprint. It is hard to imagine anyone owning a Nova, Prizm, or Vibe and then settling for a car designed by GM instead of Toyota to replace it.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    What a shame. When GM went bankrupt, they had the chance to restructure into a lean company. All that was required was a normal bankruptcy process. This would have been very bad for the UAW, but very good for the Metro Detroit area. But, the US government got involved and did a prepackaged bankruptcy to protect all the politically correct waste at the automaker. All done with your taxpayer dollars.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States