By on August 19, 2012

After discussing Kreayshawn‘s love for the Buick Reatta in the recent ’88 Buick Reatta Junkyard Find post, it seemed only fitting that I would find a car at the very same Denver self-serve yard that appears to be an homage to Kreayshawn’s greatest hit.
While the 1991-96 “Bubble” Caprice isn’t a particularly common sight in self-service wrecking yards, they’re not realy old or special enough for me to pause when I see one in the GM section among the Saturn SLs and Olds 88s. This one, however, looked a little odd.
Could it be that GM was following in the footsteps of the Etienne Agnier Edition Volkswagen Golf and bringing back the Detroit designer-edition car? Well, probably not.
It’s pretty clear that we’re looking at the aftermath of a fabric-and-glue-gun frenzy, involving a Caprice that was likely on its last few thousand miles.

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36 Comments on “Junkyard Find: Bubble Caprice, Gucci Edition...”


  • avatar

    Well, the paste-on-wallpaper probably did not make the car any uglier! I remember when there were lots of Caprices used in Ottawa as taxis and how impressive the lack of interior space was for such a gigantic car.

    • 0 avatar
      carbiz

      True, but they were so massive it never mattered. I factory ordered a ’91 Caprice in January ’91 when the new style wagon first went into production. My brother-in-law’s stag: 10 very drunken guys and me coming back from a stripper club in my car.
      Towed my boat to Florida and all over Ontario. The Tennessee mountains were not match for that 4.10 axle and my 3,500 lb boat.
      Yes, the Bordello red interior (looked better than the gawdawful powder grey, believe it or not!)left me wanting less. I even tried to find someone to paint the huge swath of cheap looking fake wood trim to black, but nobody thought paint would stick to it long term.
      Slept in the back of the 7′ bed in that thing so many times when I was too, er, drunk to drive home from the city. “Dated” my now ex-wife in the back of it, for several times, er, months.

    • 0 avatar
      ranwhenparked

      Well, if that’s how you feel about the interior space on the B-Body, I can’t wait to see your reaction to the Panther. The Caprice was one of the roomiest cars on the market, the Crown Victoria, not so much.

      • 0 avatar
        carbiz

        No, for its size, the back seat was disappointing. It was wide, to be sure, but leg room (I’m 6’2″ was less than stellar.)
        With vestiges of my Mopar fandom days still hanging on, I went to the local dealer (where I’d previously bought 2 Dodges in the ’80s, to my chagrin) and the salesguy threw me the keys to his demo: a brand new, all new Intrepid. My ’91 Caprice was only 3 years old, but the size of the interior of the Intrepid made me weep.
        However, whereas the Inrtrepid looked amazing, and for its day theh interior bits were awesome, we all know how that car line ended up.
        My Caprice went 6 years and 150,000 miles, before meeting its untimely demise due to black ice (not slanty-eyed, ‘black’), but it went to the scrapyard in the sky with all its birthday parts intact, except tires, brakes, an a/c condensor and starter.
        Too bad for Chrysler, really – had the Neon and then LHs lived up to their promise, Chrysler may have stopped being the also-ran car company.

      • 0 avatar
        mp775

        I have one of each (1994 Caprice, 2004 Grand Marquis), and the Caprice is definitely roomier.

    • 0 avatar
      200k-min

      Both the B-bodies and the Panther had pathetic interior volume considering the overall size of the vehicle. Massive hood and trunk came at the expense of a roomy backseat. I remember going from mom’s b-body oldsmobile to a Taurus in the late 80’s and the rear seat legroom was about the same sitting behind mom at the wheel. Trunk was smaller but who gives a rip?

      The Chrysler LH cars did have massive rear seat room for the time. I recall the original Lumina wasn’t bad either. It’s no wonder the old RWD body on frame vehicles were killed off. The family sedan was just as roomy in a package that was much more “right sized.”

  • avatar
    carbiz

    Ugh. Why so people do that? A buddy of mine glued faux fur all over the top and sides of his dash on his ’67 Dodge Polara. The car was 11 years old, and I thought he was joking. Nope. He left it on.
    A year later, when I purchased the car, I carefully removed the ugly turd-brown fur and was not only relieved that it came up without a fuss, but that the underlaying vinyl dash was in excellent shape,
    This is from the same guy who pulled the bulb out of the ‘low oil light’ socket because it bothered him.
    Still, I got another year out of the old beast, before selling it for twice what I had paid my friend….

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I had a neighbor who did something similar to a Peugeot 404. It could only have enhanced the value. My neighbor also did some gluing to the exterior too, adding a silver painted plastic horse as a hood ornament, a spoiler on the roof above the rear window, and multi-colored pinstriping. One of his friends probably added the “Friends don’t let friends drive Peugeots” bumper sticker.

      • 0 avatar
        carbiz

        My mother was slap-happy with the Tremclad anti-rust paint back in the day. When I got my license and was (legally) able to drive, I was proud to be driving my mother’s 10 year old ’67 Newport in that splendid canary yellow. However, Tremclad only made sort of a orangish-yellow spray paint, so the car looked like it had bee stings.
        Still, I’d rather have shown up to school in that 34 years ago, then a Camry or Elantra today….

  • avatar
    mccall52

    Nothing short of spectacular is this car still having what appears to be its original rims.

    And ride height, for that matter.

  • avatar
    tuscreen-auto

    I like that ceiling, it looks very 80s-ish.

    A Sheraton hotel that I used to sometimes visit in the early 90s had its entire lobby area laid out with a carpet sporting pretty much that same design and pattern.

    Aaahh, the 80s and early 90s…….. :)

  • avatar

    Come out here to the southeast and that would be even worse. I’ve seen a Louis Vuitton Caprice with a full interior, full matching paint job and sitting on 28″ Lexani wheels. I laughed so hard after I saw it I almost died. I also saw a early 90’s E Class convertible with a Louis Vuitton convertible top and interior, and “burple” pearlescent paint. Just look on Craigslist around here in Charlotte and Atlanta and just peep all the modified full sized American listed with awful modifications, it’s staggering.

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    Ethan nailed it. The Southeast probably has 90+% of these ‘Hooptie Hell Rides’.

    You want bad? Try a PT Cruiser covered in a wrap of thousands of fake dollar bills with the word ‘Millionz!’ emblazoned on each one. If memory serves me well, the prior owner also had his face on each one of those Cracker Jack sized bills.

    It was a repo. God how many of these tasteless machines were repos in the era of easy credit.

    One other that deserves a mention. One year old Harley Davidson CVO Ultra Classic Electra Glide. A ride that is a feast of beautiful metal and chrome… complete covered in fake leopard fur.

    The auction company tried everything to get that stuff off. Nothing worked. Eventually, by the time the sale came around, the leopard fur looked like a rough coat from a stray cat with severe random hairloss.

    • 0 avatar

      I don’t know how it was down yoUr way in Georgia a few years back, but did you guys get the box and donk craze mixed with brand names like skittles, butterfingers, and m&ms with matching paint jobs? I used to love cruising down our more hood arterial roads to see those cars, there were also some that had NASCAR paint and sticker schemes too, just the worst.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      The previous owner for that Caprice must have downsized to save fuel. I saw his (her?) new Dolce & Gabbana edition Cavalier in the parking lot outside of the Save-A-Lot last week.

  • avatar
    iainthornton

    I still think that a Fleetwood from this generation would be the best roadtrip car ever. If anyone wants to lend me one, I’ll prove it!

    Edit for possible mistake:
    Is this related to the ’93 – ’96 Fleetwood? I always thought it was, but apparently that’s possibly not true…..

    • 0 avatar
      iainthornton

      Also, how come you don’t see many? I thought there would be plenty around, or are they all still on the road?

    • 0 avatar
      ranwhenparked

      No, its the same chassis. GM designated the Fleetwood the “D-Body”, but it was just a slightly stretched B-Body chassis with self-leveling rear suspension. A lot of the body structure was shared between the two as well, and I believe the windshield and front doors where exactly the same.

      Also, having driven one from Philadelphia to Ottawa and back, I can confirm it is indeed the perfect road trip vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      mccall52

      I smile every time I see a caprice based fleetwood. Those and the 1990-1992 broughams put me in a good mood. My town car fulfills my luxury cruiser duties as of present, but in its absence it would be one of the aforementioned Cadillacs.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    This was an LTZ, the loaded model, no ordinary cop car or taxi. You can tell from the alloy wheels and leather. The Gucci trim, thats after market.

  • avatar

    I am reminded of the Louis Vuitton Olds Cutlass Ciera I see around L.A.

    God. Damn. Hipsters.

    http://www.neatorama.com/2008/03/10/ghetto-chic-the-oldsmobile-cutlass-sierra-louis-vuitton-limited-edition/

  • avatar
    AJ

    I think I’d drive the hell out of that car just to wreck it. Yikes that would be tough to look at every morning.

  • avatar
    bill mcgee

    Back in the era of the first – gen Seville someone was ” creating ” a Gucci Edition Seville . As I recall they were in white with a vinyl top done in a Gucci pattern , some gold -plated trim and possibly a unique grill . I think the interior was leather with Gucci fabric inserts but I don’t remember if there was a Gucci headliner or not . Unsure if these were offerred at your neighborhood Cadillac dealer or not but they were rather expensive and seldom seen . Sounds like kind of a tacky idea – well it was a tacky idea but in the malaise era it was something – uh different . I believe I saw at least one of those awful Seville ” Opera Coupes ” done up in the Gucci drag . This to those who don’t remember was a Seville shortened to a close coupled coupe using the sedan’s front doors with sidemounts and a mile long hood . An absolutely ridiculous looking car , a true malaise era pimpmobile .

    • 0 avatar
      mccall52

      An outfit out of Miami did the Gucci Sevilles. I’ve seen one second generation with the Gucci package, a 1980 triple black. Had a castle grille with gold interlocking G’s in place of the Cadillac hood ornament. I wanted the car for that alone.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    These looked a lot better after the refresh. They didn’t look so, bubbly. The one pictured, is hideous.

    • 0 avatar
      mccall52

      Opening the rear wheel wells did a lot for the car overall. I’m also a fan of the newer tail lamp lenses as well as the ‘C’ pillar treatment on the later models.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    My goodness, I hate these “roachmobiles”. This one looks like an art project by the artist Cristo gone bad! Phooey.

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    First a fake Veyron, and now this, what’s the world coming to.

  • avatar
    Glen.H

    Here is an advert for the Gucci Seville! http://www.flickr.com/photos/that_chrysler_guy/3006467234/

  • avatar
    Robert.Walter

    I think the headliner improved the interior of the car…

  • avatar
    dolorean

    Murilee, did you find the Royal Crown air freshener that went with the double G headliner??


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