By on July 26, 2012
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Kia has dropped the “K9″ moniker for their upcoming flagship rear-drive sedan. Instead, they’ll be going with “Quoris” as the preferred nameplate. Here’s hoping that they come to their senses and think of something else for North America. Kia claims that the name comes from a combination of “core” and “quality”. It just looks vaguely avian to me.

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37 Comments on “Kia K9 Renamed “Quoris” For Export Markets...”


  • avatar
    86er

    I thought the non-premium full size RWD car market was dead?

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The Quoris/K9 is premium – slotted btwn the Genesis and Equus sedans.

      Kia needs to go back to the boardroom and come up with something better than ‘Quoris’ which is a horrible nameplate since people don’t even know how to pronounce it.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        A ‘premium’ Kia? Can value brands have models which could seriously be considered premium?

      • 0 avatar

        How about a ‘premium’ Hyundai?

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        @28-Cars-Later

        Both Hyundai and Kia are full-line brands in Korea, as are Toyota and Nissan in Japan.

        The flagship sedan for Toyota is the Toyota Century (which the Japanese royals ride in) and not the LS460 (formerly aka as the Toyota Celsior) and Toyota also has the luxury Crown series where the Crowm Majesta is seen as competing in the flagship luxury segment with the LS460.

        Mercedes doesn’t quite have the luxury brand image in Europe that it does here. The outgoing A and B Classes were basically econoboxes and stripper E Classes serve as one of the most popular models for taxi fleets.

        Not only that, Mercedes branded trucks and commercial vans do everything from carrying cargo to picking up garbage.

  • avatar
    mcs

    I am the Quoris Goo goo g’ joob

  • avatar
    daviel

    I want one when my Sportage wears out…hopefully sooner

  • avatar
    skotastic

    Holy soul-less focus-group naming Batman!

    I was going going to rage against the Panjun name, but though silly, at least it has some meaning – though Porsche should take a page out of Alfa’s playbook and call it the Panamara GT Junior instead of the VW-esque Pan-jun.

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      If you’re referring to the Porsche “Pajun” sedan, that’s just an internal code name being used by Porsche, just like “Cajun” is the code name for the Cayenne Jr., but the production model will be called “Macan”. No one knows what they’ll call the Pajun.

  • avatar
    KalapanaBlack

    Doesn’t seem any better than Amanti to me. I don’t think anyone even knew what an Amanti was, so it isn’t like there’s a crapload of a bad rep to run away from. It wasn’t the best name ever (“Kia Amanti” doesn’t roll off the tongue), but neither is/does “Kia Quoris.” Cloris Leachman should be the spokesmodel.

    Kia has been able to turn around names pretty well in the past: Sportage, Sedona, Optima, and Rio have all been affixed to absolute low-ball garbage in the past decade, but are associated with entirely decent vehicles currently being built. Why not Amanti?

    Of course, if Kia brought the K7/Cadenza to the US (are they planning on this??), they may use the Amanti name for that. Looking at Kia’s international model names that could be used in the US (barring trademark disputes), they have several that strike my ear as better than Quoris OR Amanti: Credos, Clarus, Magentis, Potentia, Cadenza, Avella. Some are wildly different classes of vehicles in other markets, most of them aren’t manufactured anymore, and there’s nearly zero negative brand association with these names in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      KalapanaBlack

      Also, nothing could be worse than Kia Opirus (Opossum?). They also sell a bus named “Kia Granbird.”

      I just had a great branding idea: add to the Kia Soul with the Kia Sol, Kia Sole, Kia Seoul, and Kia Shoal.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      It’s a heck of a lot better than what the Amanti was.

      The K7/Cadenza is undergoing a refresh and will make its way to the US sometime next year.

      The Cadenza is in the same class as the Azera, Avalon, Taurus, etc. – the K9 has an interior that’s more luxurious than the Equus.

  • avatar
    ott

    Hmmmm. Rhymes with… Deloris.

  • avatar
    PintoFan

    I really don’t understand how this car is supposed to fit with Kia’s branding strategy in the United States. I guess I just assumed that Hyundai would gradually become the “premium” brand while Kia would primarily sell cars on value. A rear-wheel-drive flagship sedan doesn’t really seem to fit with that image.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      I thought Kia was meant to be the sporty member of the Hyundai/Kia conglomerate – the Optima is sportier looking (and maybe to drive) than the Sonata. The Sportage is sportier than the Tucson.
      But maybe you are right that Hyundai is meant to go up market and Kia stays the the value end. It is just not clear what the brands are meant to be. Not a problem when sales keep increasing but at some point in the future each brand will need a direction.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “I guess I just assumed that Hyundai would gradually become the “premium” brand while Kia would primarily sell cars on value”

      It would appear that they want both brands to each cover every base, from entry-level to premium. At the top end, Hyundai will mimic Mercedes and Lexus, while Kia will try to take on BMW and Audi.

      Not a great approach, IMO. The fact that the two companies have separate sales, marketing and distribution groups may have something to do with it; they actually compete against each other to a certain extent. (This is a sort of legacy cost from the time when they were separate entities; memories of GM, anyone?)

      Incidentally, if someone at Kia was trying to win some sort of Worst Car Name award, then they can rest easy — they have that prize in the bag.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Kia is just an affiliate of Hyundai (which has a minority ownership stake) and the 2 see each other as comeptitors, esp. in Korea.

      The K9 was developed mostly for the Korean market where full-size luxury sedans are big sellers.

      Kia presently has the K7/Cadenza which competes against the Azera and they supposedly have greenlit the RWD GT concept for production, which will give Kia a 2 sedan luxury lineup (like Infiniti).

      Hyundai is working on a compact RWD sedan so they will have the traditional 3 luxury sedan lineup.

      Hyundai is supposed to be the more mainstream brand, while Kia is supposed to be directed to the sportier side of the market.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    That video is awful.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      +1, especially when the driver thought that having a 3.8 litre engine meant to would be a blast to drive,. Someone needs to tell him (engine) size isn`t everything!

  • avatar
    moedaman

    If the car is named K9 in S. Korea, couldn’t they have kept the same theme and name it hamburger here?

  • avatar

    This reminds me of BMW F10.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    Maybe the US name should be “Chorus”. That would make much more sense. “Quoris” will be a strikeout.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    How about K-19? Periscope optional.

  • avatar
    gsnfan

    K9 sounds like a dog. Quoris sounds like some obscure Latin association.

    Neither are good names for a car.

    Even Cadenza sounds better.

  • avatar
    Nick

    From the front it reminds me of an Ewok.

  • avatar
    amac

    This Quoris quandary has created much quibbling. The quorum involved in this quackery must quickly quash this queer and questionable name! I’m sorry, but I just can’t keep quiet about this!

  • avatar
    shaker

    The new Queef… from Kia. From the purr of its engine to the fragrance of its interior, you’ll be entranced. Settle into the warmth of the heated seat with the exclusive grasping side bolsters, and ride, ride, ride.

  • avatar
    PaulVincent

    I like it. And if Chevy can have Cruze, then Quoris is just dandy.


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