By on July 17, 2012

The 2013 Ford Mondeo, aka our 2013 Fusion, was supposed to hit UK showrooms around this time, but the launch has been pushed back to September, so Ford can work out some quality-related bugs prior to its on-sale date.

AutoExpress spoke to a Ford representative in the UK, who told the publication that the Mondeo would be delayed so that Ford could “work through various issues to ensure a robust and high-quality launch”. Specifics weren’t given by Ford, but WhatCar, quoted another unnamed Ford spokesman as stating

‘We have a complex global vehicle programme, and we have to sort issues with the vehicle’s robustness and quality that would not be met with the original timings,’ he continued.

The European Mondeos are all sourced from Ford’s Genk, Belgium assembly plant. In the mean time, the tried-and-true current Mondeo will be produced to supply the market.

There’s been no indication that American-market Fusions will be afflicted with these sorts of problems (yet), but that doesn’t mean Ford hasn’t learned from the issues that affected the initial months of the Fiesta and Focus. Hopefully, they paid attention and learned from past transgressions. The importance of the Mondeo in Europe can’t be overstated, and a botched launch would be disastrous, perhaps more so than the DN101 Taurus kerfuffle was for North America.

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52 Comments on “2013 Ford Mondeo Delayed...”


  • avatar
    jhefner

    ” perhaps more so than the second-generation Taurus kerfuffle was for North America.”

    Are you referring to the 1992-1995 release, or the third-generation 1996-1999 release? While the second generation was panned as being too much like the first generation; it was the best selling generation, and outsold both the Camery and Accord.

    The third generation Taurus on the other hand tanked with older buyers, and sales never recovered.

    I am glad Ford is delaying the launch rather than releasing it warts and all; which is also what they did with the third generation Taurus. They knew about the issue with the cupholders and center armrest interfering with each other, but chose to release it anyway; just to name one example.

    The NASCAR 2013 Fusion is looking good as well.

    • 0 avatar

      The DN101 version

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        That’s the third generation. The second generation from 1992-1995 was an evolutionary change; while it looked alike, few of the body and interior parts were interchangable with the first generation (1986-1991) version.

        So Ford responded to the criticism by doing a total restyle with the DN101 platform; history records how that turned out.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        ……The second generation from 1992-1995 was an evolutionary change; while it looked alike, few of the body and interior parts were interchangable with the first generation (1986-1991) version……

        While the dash and things like that changed, much of the stampings and hard parts were interchangeable through all four generations. I bought leather seats from a G4 and the fronts bolted directly into my G2 car, though the airbags in the seats remain disconnected. The rears on G4 cars had a pass through capability which G2 cars did not have. Any question on why cars got so heavy could start with a comparison of the rear seats. The pass through seat assembly probably weighs three times that of the fixed rear seats in the older car. Many other parts interchange without modification, the best being that SHO stuff transferred easily and I took many a SHO part to my car. IMO the G2 cars were the best: all the G1 bugs were gone and they looked decent unlike the fish face ovoid nightmare design of G3. You could argue that the G4 was the best, and in many ways it might be – just look at how much nicer the interior was on these cars. But by this point the platform was old in the tooth and no longer competitive no matter how much dressing was put on it.

        Ford deserves kudos for holding off until the car is correct. It may make for bad a initial buzz, but I don’t see a problem. Back in the bad old days the car would be corrected as it was built.

  • avatar
    Subifreak

    This is why I never buy a car in it’s first year of production…

    • 0 avatar
      MeaCulpa

      A good rule, first year usually means higher prices to boot as the dealers won’t knock to much of msrp if the car is “hot”. In europe the first year usually has crappier equipment list as the buyers are the keener kind that doesn’t mind paying through the nose for “luxury”. My dear father was an ardent supporter of the theory that you’d better buy the LAST model year of a new car.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      I don’t and won’t buy first year production cars, either.

      I suppose an exception might be made one day, if the reasons for not doing so were swallowed whole by a golden opportunity.

      And why does this Ford have the guppy mouth syndrome going on? I hope Ford didn’t hire Chris Bangle to ‘pretty up’ their front ends.

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    This makes sense. It’s mid-July and we’ve herd absolutely nothing new about the new Fusion since it debut at the detroit auto show in January. I expected epa mpg numbers and some sample car test drives by now but there’s nothing.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Good to see Ford take a step back and ensure success rather than rush botched models into production, which seems to be more the norm.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    Just rush it into production, ignore the customer’s complaints about the problems, fix them quietly after a year or so–or never after you pay off the NHSTA to say there is nothing wrong with the car… like with the Fiesta, Focus, Mustang, Raptor…

    People will still buy Fords.

    Oh, wait, this is the European market. Ford actually cares about THOSE customers.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      You commented below though the entire car lineup has become Euro-spec’d designs to which I agree. So if they are mindful of Europe’s models logically they are solving potential problems in advance before rolling out in North America. Seems kinda bright to me.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      You must have drank too many hatorades at lunch.

      It’s a global program. There are global issues and then there are domiciled assembly plant / regional supplier issues. Now take your pick which caused the delay.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      @FJ60LandCruiser

      What problems?

      The only “problem” my 2012 Focus has had in the past 9 months is that adaptive cruise control (perhaps not the technical term) gets a tad over-zealous when climbing hills and drops gears unnecessarily. Hardly an issue – if I know I’m coming up a big hill, I disable the CC temporarily and re-enable it with the pull of a finger.

      I count the DCT “issues” (of which I’ve experienced absolutely none) to be a programming glitch, which according to the forums I’ve read has been more or less resolved, and the only other thing I’ve heard of is a recall on the passenger side windshield wiper motor because if you are trying to activate it when it’s cover in 5 inches of ice, it may fail. Oh noes.

  • avatar

    The old Mondeo was a great car (specially like the late 90s one). The Fusion is ok but could use improvements. This will be a good test of the One Ford Global (as in North America and W. Europe) strategy.

    • 0 avatar
      FJ60LandCruiser

      Ford has essentially replaced its entire car lineup with Euro-spec models.

      I will contend that Americans could give less of a crap about things Eurpoeans value in cars, but I could be wrong.

      • 0 avatar

        Hey FJ60LandCruiser:

        I think your right. Americans I suppose have come to expect more involved driving than, say, they could get from their land yatches, but a truly Euro car will always be a niche player in the US (like VW Golf or Fiat 500). I’m guessing this one Ford thing will go away after a while.

      • 0 avatar
        FJ60LandCruiser

        I think they will start to re-evaluate their global strategy when the current retro Mustang gets replaced with a Euro styled one.

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        Ford Focus — I think a euro spec car will work globally, including the U.S. Sales to date seem to bear this out; I am already seeing several of the 2013 model on the road.

        Mustang — not so much. Didn’t they try that before, and it failed? The Mustang is an American car, period.

        Fusion — not so sure. The exterior shots I see do not scream euro-spec; not like the Focus with it’s Audi-like “big mouth bass” grill. I like the new Fusion; releasing the NASCAR Fusion at the same time will also make it seem more like a “home grown” design rather than a global design.

      • 0 avatar

        @jhefner
        The problem with the Focus is that it’s too expensive to be a truly global car. Global that is if your definition of global includes places beyond US, Canada, Western Europe and Australia.

        They need something smaller or cheaper to compete elsewhere. The new Fiesta is too small and Ford doesn’t have a B-segment sized, A-segment priced car (a la Logan) that is growing worldwide. Unfortunately, I believe global is a code word for 1st world. All fine and dandy but Ford needs to keep their eyes on the ball in all those places that hanker for a car and are starting to have money to actually buy one.

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        As I sit here fat, dumb, and happy in my American Legion T-shirt. Prithee, what do Europeans value in cars that Americans could give a hoot about? When I lived in the UK we would good naturedly kid the “long haul” lorry drivers about their grueling eight hour trips. At a Little Chef, bout anything passed as entertainment.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        Getting the Euro-spec Focus has elevated that nameplate from ‘OK as a budget pick’ to legitimately best in class when it comes to handling, interior quality, and high-end (as well as highly profitable) options. Since the new Focus has come out I’ve had one customer who couldn’t get over the shift feel of the DCT, and one who had chronic MFT issues before the update, but overall it’s brought in many customers who would never have looked at a Focus, or even an American compact, before. Minor first year teething issues aside, it’s been a resounding success.

        For the Mustang, we’ll have had 10 years of retro when the all new ’15 model arrives. The Fox body and SN-95 weren’t retro, but still looked like Mustangs. As long as the Mustang remains an affordable and stylish performance car the new one will do well. It was the first of the Pony/Muscle cars to go retro, and it will be the first to leave the retro baggage behind again. Ford can’t count on the Boomers who gobbled up the retro-stangs to keep buying for nostalgia forever. The car needs to make a break from the past while still staying true to its roots to attract new and younger buyers.

    • 0 avatar
      3800FAN

      Really? The mondeo was a great car? We had the 90s mondeo here. It was called the Contour. It was a fun drive but reliability wise it was the pits. Go to any junkyard and you’ll be hard pressed to find one with more than 120k.

      • 0 avatar

        3800FAN

        Always the conundrum of reliability. In Brazil the Mondeo had a good reputation though some were wary of it ’cause parts were imported and too expensive. But it was a blast to drive and went over 210km/h with the 2.0. Good cornering, interesting design, lots of space. Liked it very much thank you. The wagon version was also quite handsome.

      • 0 avatar
        Verbal

        Still driving my ’96 Contour SE at 176k miles. Just changed the clutch for the first time. You are correct: it is not in the junkyard.

      • 0 avatar
        supremebrougham

        I bought a Contour a number of years ago, it was a mechanical nightmare, but driving it was so intoxicating that I replaced it with another one. Several years later I was given a Mystique. Lots of problems, but I got it fixed. Sold it to my best friend last year. I wish I still had it, and he isn’t about to give it up.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    If Ford gets this right, they may just have a winner here. I’m not too fond of the fish-mouth grille, but it’s better than nothing and perhaps it’ll be toned down a bit. Judging from the photo, the front overhang appears horrendous, but I’m sure it’s just the photo angle.

    Can’t wait for the first TTAC review.

    Overall, so far I like what I see.

  • avatar
    PaulieWalnut

    As far ask I know the Mondeo has been pushed back from July 2013 to September 2013.

    Like with the Escape/Kuga, the Fusion will launch in NA first, followed by the Mondeo in Europe.

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    While I love the new fusion’s styling I’m skeptical about it’s reliability. Up till now the Fusion has been the same platform as the mazda6 which is bullet-proof. Now it’s gonna be the european ford Mondeo. We had that car here back in the 90s, ie: the Ford Contour. It was a fun car to drive but reliability wise it was a step down from the rest of Ford’s lineup at the time. So suffice to say I’m skeptical.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Yep.

      I remember the hosts of Top Gear panting breathlessly about the Mondeo (the upcoming U.S. Fusion) being a stealth BMW.

      And then I discovered it was a reliability plagued model just by doing brief research on some UK forums.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      The actual platform, hard points, unibody, etc, doesn’t have that much to do with reliability.

      The Fusion is going to launch with a traditional automatic, and the engine options are the already proven 2.5 liter I4, the EcoBoost 2.0 which has been out for a little over a year in the US without issue, and the EcoBoost 1.6 which recently launched in the US with the ’13 Escape and has thus far not proven to be problematic.

      Technology-wise there’s nothing coming out that should cause issues – the new MFT systems are working the way they should have from the beginning, and the rest of the options have already been available for the most part.

      This isn’t a hastily federalized Euro-car, it’s a new platform that developed out of the current Fusion’s CD3 and the Mondeo’s EUCD.

  • avatar
    Freddie

    I thought I read somewhere that Ford’s US division was handling the development of the new Mondeo. Anyone know if that’s correct?

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      It certainly looks like Ford’s US customers will be serving as the development testers.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Chris Hamilton, who designed the Fusion, was working for Ford Europe and designed the Fiesta. For the Fusion/Mondeo, they moved him to Dearborn. Most of the engineering has been done in Dearborn as well. There has been global input, and there will be differences based on the market.

        As important as the Mondeo is in Europe, its everything in the US. Only the F-series is more important. There is a reason why the Fiesta/Focus/Escape were rolled out first (and in that order). Hopefully Ford has learned from the successes and failures of those product launches.

  • avatar

    With this big snout that car looks as ugly / out of proportion as a Peugeot 407.
    Good luck, for Ford, quality issues aside,

  • avatar
    mike978

    Derek – I might have mis-remembered but at the time of the Detroit auto show when the Fusion was unveiled I recall the Mondeo was to be unveiled at Frankfurt in September. Therefore it was unlikely to be launched prior to Frankfurt. With the Fusion always going to be the first launched.
    Do you know any more about this?

  • avatar
    SV

    Ford sold less than 100,000 Mondeos last year in Europe, so while it’s still important it’s not nearly as much so as it used to be (thanks BMW). Not that they shouldn’t try to iron everything out, of course.

  • avatar
    supremebrougham

    I’ve seen these car in the wild, prototypes, and while the front is distinctive, the rest of the car leaves me cold, style-wise. Too many form-over-function compromises for me. I liked the original Fusion because it just looked “right”. I wouldn’t mind owning one. The new one? Won’t be on my shopping list anytime soon…

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I feel like this is gonna bomb in Europe. Its a big mother lover.

    Actually I just checked the dimensions. Apparently the current Mondeo is like an inch smaller? I’m surprised. Maybe it will be a hit after all.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      The new Fusion/Mondeo is quite similar to the current Mondeo both in size and looks (especially the sides and back). The front has been “refined” from the current Mondeo but there are similarities.
      The current Mondeo is well regarded (just look at WhatCar.co.uk – the UK’s equivalent of Edmunds) so solid expectations for this one too.

  • avatar
    oldyak

    Very nice looking!!!

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    I don’t care for the looks of the new Fusion, but I don’t think the looks are going to impact the sales. While it does not look great, it looks good enough. Personally, I would have done something a little more conservative because the majority of people don’t want an overstyled vehicle.

    However what will make a difference is reliability. Long term reliability as measured by Consumer Reports and JD Powers is what really matters. If Ford is holding the vehicle back because it will not score industry leading reliability, then that is the smart move, even if the delay is very lengthly. Ford executives should allow such a delay, and consider the fault of the product managers who underestimated the project plan.

    Ford needs to become more Toyota and Honda like when it comes to releasing a products only when reliability is industry leading. If Ford adopts this strategy, it will find people on the coasts will purchase Ford products again. Only problem is this strategy takes about 5 years before long term reliability in Consumer Reports and JD Powers conveys the message to the public. But this is what it takes for Ford to match Toyota and Honda. Perhaps Ford has seen the light.

    If Ford appears in the Toyota and Honda crowd in brand reliability, and it’s products are priced as Toyota and Honda, you will see a Ford in my driveway, even if it is overstyled. We will see. It hs hard for me to imagine Ford climbing from it’s current ranking, but it is possible if Ford management worries less about technology gadgets and styling and more about reliability.

    • 0 avatar
      JREwing

      Don’t look now, but the current and last-gen Fusion have ranked alongside the Camry and Accord in reliability since launch. The Focus and Taurus have also performed respectably.

  • avatar
    faygo

    as others have noted, the US Fusion was always planned to launch first, followed in ~6 months by the Mondeo. the US launch date has not moved to my knowledge and remains 4Q of this year. Mondeo has moved back a quarter or so from where it was previously planned.

    There would not be expected press drives or the like until late this year, in line with other Ford launches. debut of the production car in Detroit is also similar cadence to other recent vehicles.

    Primary engineering of the Fusion/Mondeo has been done here in the US, with regional support as is normal in this sort of global program.


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