By on June 6, 2012

Old-timers will tell you that the Golden Age of the Sleeper ran from the end of World War II through the late 1960s, when you could take, say, a Grandma-spec ’61 Lancer wagon and stuff the engine compartment full of Max Wedge 413 power. I think the old-timers are as wrong about that as they are about the superiority of film cameras over digital cameras; the current era of computerized engine controls, big turbochargers, and tougher drivetrain components means you can get ridiculous power (and handling) out of quotidian transportation appliances. So, looking at the current lineup of snore-inducing machinery that nobody would ever in a million years suspect of being quick, which new car would provide the best balance of potential performance and invisibility? A Kia Rio with a huge turbocharger and the finest suspension upgrades that cubic yards of cash can buy?
The problem with the Rio is that it’s so invisible that nobody would quite know what to think when one is sighted getting 100 yards of rubber shifting into fourth gear on the highway. That’s why I think the Camry would be my sleeper of choice. The ’12 Camry’s V6 makes a fairly decent 268 horses, but the use of the same engine family in Toyota trucks means that you can get all manner of aftermarket supercharger and turbocharger kits for it. I’d want a manual transmission, and (if I couldn’t find some JDM unit that bolts onto the tranverse-mount GR engine) I’d see if the RAV4 6-speed could survive 400+ boosted horsepower.
Yeah, nobody would know what to make of a bone-stock-appearing Camry that could really haul the mail! What new car would you choose for such a project?

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

103 Comments on “Question: Which New Car Would Make the Sneakiest Sleeper?...”


  • avatar
    Felix Hoenikker

    A Chevy Volt with super high HP electric motors along with an electric powered fart can muffler that makes a low tumbling sound that shakes it and other nearby cars when the pedal is put to the metal.

    • 0 avatar
      cdotson

      If you’re going to use a Volt for a sleeper (and really, no one would want to) and commit cubic yards of money to it, may as well go whole hog. The Volt chassis has a built-in driveshaft tunnel if you strip all the batteries out of the way. Boiling it down it doesn’t look too far off of the Vette’s backbone chassis, so stuff a Corvette ZR1 or Z06 powertrain in there.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      I would _love_ bolt-on ultracapacitors with higher voltage to ‘overclock’ the electric motor for 0-60 boostage.. I’m thinking the first-gen Volt is so overengineered that it could take some pretty nice power adders, if an aftermarket can develop that’s willing to hack on its assorted 10MM lines of code..

  • avatar
    ajla

    The problem with all “sleepers” is that people have ears. I’ll be able to hear that turbo Rio, 427 Country Squire, or hopped up Cummins. At that point the car isn’t really sneaky, just unique/bizarre.

    Really the best sleeper would have to be electric or a hybrid or something else where modification doesn’t add a lot of noise.

    • 0 avatar

      Turbochargers make engines nice and quiet. Actually, I recall some street racers from the early 1980s with huge V8s and quiet mufflers suitable for Grandpa’s Continental, and they weren’t incredibly obvious. It was the traction bars and wide rear tires that gave them away.

      • 0 avatar
        Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

        Don’t the STS cat-back turbos pass inspection without additional mufflers?

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Most engines using forced induction make a unique noise though, especially on some home-brewed Kia Rio aftermarket turbo setup.

        Maybe you could beef up the under hood sound deadening, or only race people in a Lexus LS, or have your car dropped at the starting line by a sky crane.

        But every car has a tell.

      • 0 avatar
        Felis Concolor

        Most of those unique noises come from poor induction tuning, or a simple blow-off valve instead of a proper bypass plumbed back into the exhaust system, the better to silence that silly chuffing noise kids still think sounds cool. Several turbocharger systems marketed in the 80s were so good at quieting engine exhaust noises you could run them sans mufflers without alerting any ears. And today’s variable induction systems along with modern electronic control logic allows for grocery-getter overlap at low speeds but max scavenging power at WOT.

        The only tell a proper sleeper has occurs when you mash the loud pedal.

    • 0 avatar
      Gedrven

      Three words: exhaust bypass valve.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The Turbo Verano has four(4) straight through mufflers. You can keep it as quiet as you want to remove them to make your presence but she is very quiet. With Trifecta tune and supporting intake and exhaust along with Buick’s subtle styling the Verano “Fast with Class” once again. Just don’t expect everyone to know about it. The 6-speed Verano on yahoo are mid-to-low $20′s used.

  • avatar
    28-cars-later

    As much as it makes my skin crawl to say it, I agree the Camry would make an excellent sleeper. Not only because of inherent technical prowess noted in the article but simply because the image of the Camry is the exact opposite of ‘quick’. When I think of one I think ‘death by boredom’ and I would never expect to be smoked by one out on the open road.

    • 0 avatar
      nikita

      Make it a refrigerator white one.

      • 0 avatar
        Shipwright

        Naw. Make it bland Beige.

      • 0 avatar
        KalapanaBlack

        I’m not sure I’d go with the Camry. Seems to me that “sleeper” implies that nobody would ever think it’s a car that’s supposed to be sporty. We enthusiasts know better, but Toyota specifically markets the Camry SE as “kinda-sporty” so that Helen down the street things she got a sports car when she ordered her new red Camry SE V6.

        I say go for something nobody will ever see coming. If you’re going to go Toyota, put the TRD supercharger under the hood of a base Avalon or a beige ES350.

        I’ve always liked the minivan option, as well as SUVs/CUVs, but there’s quite a bit involved in making them do more than just accelerate quickly, as they are tall-riding, softly-ish suspended grocery getters from the factory. Perhaps “sleeper” means simply accelerating more quickly than someone would assume a given car capable of to most people, but I’d rather have well-rounded performance.

        Thus, I’d pick something that’s available in other markets in sporty-ish trim, but not here, or something that’s related to something that’s pretty sporty.

        A current Corolla LE with an old modded Ret Top 4AGE would be nice. Nobody’d see that coming.

        Or a Buick Lucerne or Cadillac DTS that’s been re-engineered to accept some of the RWD Northstar’s parts from the STS-V.

        If I were to do a Rio, it’d be the last-gen body style.

        I love the idea of a current Impala with a bench seat and some bolt-ons added to the 3.6, which already starts at 306 hp. I don’t believe they offer the bench anymore from the factory but there are scads of ’06+ Impalas with bench seats out there thanks to rental buyers. Retrofit and drive!

        I pine for the ’90s when there were lots of factory sleepers. They weren’t THAT fast, but STS Northstars, Park Avenue Ultras, Olds LSSs, Regal GSs, Luminas with the absurd 3.4 DOHC, Grand Prix GTPs, Lincoln Mark VIIIs and Continentals with the InTech V8, Mitsubishi Galants that shared almost every part with 4G63 turbo AWD Eclipses, Suzuki Swifts with multi-cam JDM engines, those are where it’s at!

    • 0 avatar
      Mark MacInnis

      A front-drive car can not be a sleeper. Period.

      End of discusssion.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Smart/Hyabusa.

    /end thread

  • avatar
    Sundowner

    2008 VW Passat wagon. They are stupid light, were available with a stick, and they all came with the same 2.0T motor that came in the GTI, so the engine mod potential is pretty much unimited. suspension parts are not entirely shared with the GTI, but there’s enough there make it work.

    Go as fast as you want. No one looks twice at wagons.
    Did that white whale just pass me at 140 mph? was that a turbo bypass valve hissing as he downshifted? nah… can’t be…

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Regular cab F-150 with the 5.0 option and the 3.73 limited-slip. Even the well equipped XLT would come in less than $30K before rebates. No Ego-Boost option for regular cabs, though. That would be loco. Or a Lightning.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Basically any minivan would do, but the best option would, I think, be a prior-generation AWD Sienna with the front wheels disconnected.

  • avatar
    Egroeg1000

    Outback STI

    • 0 avatar
      Madroc

      I like this idea a lot. As long as you keep the revs up, the 2.5i isn’t *underpowered* for its intended use as a family-hauler, but I’ve always said that if my wife’s 2010 were my daily driver I’d long to swap in the hood, engine and related hardware from a Legacy GT. That, along with a short-throw shifter and lowering/stiffening the suspension, could make a delightful ride.

      But if one were to go to such lengths, one might as well go whole-hog STi, as you suggest.

    • 0 avatar
      FuzzyPlushroom

      Exactly my thought. Homely CUV/wagon looks, but everything you need /snould/ bolt right in… and there’s quite a Subaru aftermarket.

      You could probably make a few bucks off some poor sap, particularly if you left the steelies and ugly hubcaps on. I’d have it in green.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Camry is okay, but isn’t especially sleeper anymore with the V6.

    Non-stock possibilities: Focus RS drivetrain in a Transit Connect, twin turbos on a 3.6L W-body Lacrosse, turbo K20 in an Element.

  • avatar
    highlandmiata

    Renault espace f1. http://www.topspeed.com/cars/renault/1994-renault-espace-f1-ar34982.html

    but with a less garish paint job. people would see the spoiler, laugh, and then pee their pants as you launched across the intersection. Sure, the exhaust note from the v10 might be a bit telling, but no one would believe their ears.

  • avatar

    I agree with what Lieberman wrote in MT: Take a (brown, natch) E63 wagon, slap on some E320 4Matic badges.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Buick Verano with 2.0 Turbo from the Regal.

    Or, Chevy Cruze Eco with 2.0 Turbo from the Regal.

    Or, Chevy Sonic sedan (the hatch seems too obvious) with 2.0 Turbo from the Regal.

    Or, Zoo York skateboard with 2.0 Turbo from the Regal.

    I could do this all day…

    • 0 avatar
      toplessFC3Sman

      The verano is going to get the 2.0T from the regal, so no work required!

    • 0 avatar
      jetcal1

      That’s why I’m gonna look at the Verano along with the ATS and Focus ST. Added bonus; The customer demographics might make the Verano cheap to insure. My G20 was cheap to insure and I bought Primera go fast bits while I was deployed. It was a great sleeper.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Verano Turbo is where it’s at. With more torque than any Japanese V6 will have in the next decade, no DI in a V6 let alone turbos, it is what really moves the car.

      The 2.0T LHU has been isolated you’ll think your running a battery at the stoplight, it’s that smooth. Not to mention the ride and NVH is top notch, not only best in class but best in classes above it from any manufacturer.

      Any that sleeper thing…

      http://shop.zzperformance.com/store/p/1007-LHU-Regal-o2-Housing-Downpipe-package.aspx

      Where else are you going to flaunt 350hp/380trq with the ZZP/Trifecta modifications as not many sedans can keep up? And when you are being good I did see 39.3 mpg on one tank commuting for 120 miles daily. That’s hybrid economy with 3x the power output! But we know Prius’ in their areo shape are already slow.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Ford Econoline. Supercharge the 5.4L and watch it fly.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Fly… Off of the first turn it comes to…!

      Dammit, now you’ve got the “Wreck of The Old ’97″ going through me head.

      “Steve, this is not 38, but the old 1997 Econoline turbo charged van-thing.” That section of US-29 actually is a mighty rough road between Lynchburg and Danville, at least if you’re hitting 90 on the downhills in a full-sized van. Been there, didn’t have the balls to do that. Which is why I’m writing snarky comments like this one, rather than eating through a tube…!

    • 0 avatar
      SuperACG

      Dang, you got to it before I did! I was thinking of Sajeev’s Supercharged Navigator, and thought an E-Series would be even better! Of course, with that old suspension design, I’d probably kill myself!

  • avatar
    Madroc

    Build-your-own Mazdaspeed5. The 5 is available with a stick, and based on the 3 platform, so I see no reason why this couldn’t be done with engine and other bits from a Speed3.

    • 0 avatar
      MZ3AUTOXR

      I read somewhere that this has been tried. The big issue is that the wiring harnesses are different and there were issues with trying to get the thing to run right.

      • 0 avatar
        protomech

        C&D did this a few years ago. It was a mess.
        http://www.caranddriver.com/features/return-of-the-boss-wagon-mazdaspeed-5

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Use the entire wiring loom from the donor car including the CPU and instrument cluster. A pro can rewire the orginal cluster, but we’re not them. Splice in 12v accessories like lights, power windows, HVAC, etc. unless their plugs and contectors snap right in with the same schematics/color codes. Forgeting a ground wire causes the most havoc.

      • 0 avatar
        Richard Chen

        IIRC 0-60 in 7.1 seconds, about 3 faster than stock but still slower than a Camry V6

  • avatar
    replica

    Turbo a Mazda2.

    5.0 in a Ford Flex.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      C&D dropped the MazdaSpeed3′s powertrain into the Mazda5 a few years back. That…could work.

    • 0 avatar
      Scrming

      No need to put a 5.0 in the Flex! The EcoBoost does a pretty amazing jobs!!! Our Flex has been called an “amazing sleeper” by plenty of folks! Right now our Flex is running 12.95 in 1/4 and doing 0-60 MPH in 4.3 seconds! This is in FULL STREET TRIM, including the kid’s booster seats! LOL! and all season tires!

      With minimal mods: Tune, methanol injection and a simple axle back exhaust our Flex dynoed at 360 whp and 400 wtq… this is an AWD which put it at about 460 HP and 500 TQ at the crank!

      Here’s a little video i made of me taking on a couple of V8s:

      In case the youtube link doesn’t work search on “Ford Flex Drag Racing” to see some of my videos (channel is fishingjts)

  • avatar
    TEXN3

    Fusion AWD with a chipped Ecoboost 3.5l V6.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Who is going to be the first to build up a mid-engine Prius?

  • avatar
    mkirk

    I thought the sleeper was more or less something that came from the factory as is. Something like the Grand Nationals or the first gen Taurus SHO. The true gearhead recognizes them but everyone else sees another Taurus or Regal.

    As far as built ones I’d take one of those Festivs SHOGuns if money is no object and ditch the widebody and throw on some steel wheels. I did also see a writup in one of the import mags where someone took a first gen insight and stuck in one of the big Acura motors.

    One day however my first-gen Miata will have an LS1 under the hood. That would be sleeper material I’d think.

    • 0 avatar
      John

      Sorry, but that’s incorrect. Sleepers were invented back in the old days of street drag racing for money. Two guys would pair off and bet money on who would win. The point of a sleeper was to have a fast car that looked slow, so you would catch the other guy “sleeping” and win his money.

      • 0 avatar
        Mark MacInnis

        …pink slip. As in, “‘Round here, we race for pinks!”

      • 0 avatar

        Yeah, I recall seeing street-race Novas and Mustangs in Georgia with fiberglass front ends that had been Dremel’d and painted to look like rusty steel.

      • 0 avatar
        Feds

        One of the most amazing car places I’ve ever been to is George Rays Widcat drags: Every race has a side bet on it, and even for an obvious Canuck with no interest in putting the pink slip of his rental grand marquis on the line getting one of those good old boys to open their hood and/or talk about what there running is next to impossible.

      • 0 avatar
        fastwagon

        Not sure that “incorrect” applies to matters of slang lexicography. “Sleeper” is a loose term that applies to cars that look slow or boring and have hidden capabilities for going fast. And it’s the car that’s the sleeper, not the other driver. As in “Let sleeping dogs/dragons lie,” an expression that gets at the initially harmless appearance of a sleeping thing that conceals a dangerous power.
        – Even if your version of the initial derivation of the word is historically correct, there’s an underlying structure to the “-er” suffix that tends to attribute the sleeping to the car that’s called a “sleeper.” Given the loose ways in which words, especially slang words, are transmitted, over time, the meaning of the word will become something said about the car, not another driver, as long as a plausible metaphor for a sleeping car is available. And it is.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    Regal 2.0T with Trifecta tune for 61 horsepower and 51 lb-ft of torque at the wheels over stock. Or about 25% more torque than Lexus GS350.

  • avatar
    joeb-z

    Wagons are very sneaky. My 2005 Subary Legacy GT wagon has had moderate work, dynos about 290HP and weighs 3400 lbs. About 22 lbs of boost at peak. Not awesome but certainly surprising. Stock mufflers so not loud at all. It would be sneakier if I could get a hood without the scoop as it now has a large FMIC so no need for the scoop except it might cool things a bit.

    • 0 avatar
      fastwagon

      Years ago I had a basic econobox ’87 Sentra in oxidized red. I got so many tickets that I was on the verge of losing my license. Then I got a white ’89 Corolla wagon, and while I owned that car, I never got a ticket and went down to zero points. It wasn’t my driving that changed. Some of the change may have involved the color difference, but that harmless-looking, housewifey white wagon got me out of a lot of trouble. Anyone who remembers the styling of that version of the Corolla or Googles images of it will see how soft and round it was. No sharp corners or folds, no cat-shaped headlights, nothing aggressive about it. The styling, the color, and the wagon configuration all contributed to why I could be going along at 85 without getting stopped. Had that car been suitably modified, it would have been a great sleeper.
      – The last-generation Hyundai Accent had similar “blatantly harmless” styling, as did the last-gen Elantra Touring. The Ford C-max is about as harmless, though it’s hard to conceive of a minivan, with its high center of gravity, as a sleeper except in the bare-minimum, straight-line acceleration category.
      – Today, some econoboxes are styled “awkwardly.” The Chevy Spark comes to mind. The car’s looks suggest geeky social awkwardness, and might also qualify a car for sleeperhood. An Element might fit in here, were it not for the high center-of-gravity and handling limits. Classically awkward cars would include the AMC Gremlin and Pacer and the Pontiac Aztec.
      – The problem with wagons is that you can’t get them here. Overseas, people don’t have the irrational fear of wagons or the irrational attachment to booster-seat cars, and wagons are plentiful. Here, for a wagon to sell, it has to be called a “sportwagon” or, in a truly pathetic and slavish surrender to stigma, a “shooting brake.” It’s kind of sad the way that Americans go for SUVs, with their rude, visibility-blocking booster-seat configuration reminiscent of high heels for short men. Though it’s not widely publicized, taller vehicles’ fatality rate in single-vehicle accidents is half again higher than for regular cars, and single-vehicle accidents cause 55% of highway fatalities. Karma, I guess, for that “I want to kill small-car drivers to save myself” attitude of many SUV and light truck drivers.
      – The feminization of American culture that makes the women prone to showy aggressiveness and self-centeredness, and the men need some strap-on male secondary sex characteristics. And the waning of civility makes the inherent rudeness of unnecessarily massive vehicles seem acceptable, without a second thought or even a first.
      – Wagons are cars with added cargo volume that also have no inherent limitations regarding handling. It’s too bad that we live in a time of impressionable, sheep-brained, viral crowds.

  • avatar

    Maybe the chin spoiler and wheels disqualify it as a *real* sleeper, but I think the body mods are subtle enough that you’re probably a little taken aback when you find out this Camry makes about 728 RWHP.

    http://autos.sympatico.ca/weird-automotive-news/9816/ontario-tuners-get-728-horsepower-out-of-camry

    • 0 avatar
      toplessFC3Sman

      Rear-wheel HP? they converted it to RWD too?

      Edit – just went to the article, and although they say its at the rear wheels, the video shows the dynapacks on the fronts, and the pics still have the engine mounted transversely, so not RWD

  • avatar
    turbobrick

    New car? Honda CR-V. That to me screams “grandma’s car” more than anything else on the road. If we’re allowed to expand the search to recently built and sold cars, I’d say Kia Rondo. I wonder how many of those are getting resprayed in Celtics green.

  • avatar
    Jellodyne

    Drive got this one right. The debadged LS4 Impala SS from the first part of Drive, with go-fast bits.

    • 0 avatar
      potatobreath

      Impala 3.6 VVT? I imagine the exhaust note is less obvious than the V8. Have to do something about the eco-minded transmission, or rig up some accessible paddle shifters instead of the hidden +/- button by the cruise control.

  • avatar
    E30-LS1

    Our BMW E30, which already has a 5.7l LS1 V8 & T56 tranny…………hee,hee,hee

  • avatar
    Slow_Joe_Crow

    This is an opening for one of my favorite whacko projects. Imagine a minivan powered by a mid mounted blown Hemi driving the rear wheels. The engine would be accessible through the sliding side doors and draw air through a NACA duct in the roof and out back you would have tubbed rear wheel wells and a fuel cell where the Stow’n\'go 3rd row would normally live. The original drivetrain would be replaced by ballast in normal use, but removable for wheelies on the strip. The intent is to produce something that looks as much like a stock family hauler as possible while still doing 10 second quarters.

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    2012 Impala LS (16 in aluminum wheels) 3.6V6 VVT 300hp. Put higher speed rated rubber on it, white paint, tinted windows, and get the computer re-flashed to remove the speed limiter. Upgrade the shocks and add the sway bars from an Impala SS.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    Well, there is already a turbo 4 minvan running low, low 12 second quarter mile times and JGC SRT8 running in the 10s. The minivan looks and sounds pretty stock whereas the Jeep doesn’t quite pull it off. I think a Hyabusa powered Isetta would be a great sleeper.

  • avatar
    iainthornton

    http://forum.alfa145.com/uploads/monthly_05_2010/post-4027-1273519663.jpg

    This; it has all the running gear from a Jag XJ220

  • avatar
    flameded

    Well, I think a great sleeper would be made out of a… PT Cruiser.
    I’ll leave the technicals up to your imaginations, but c’mon, if that’s not your Mom/grandma car, nothing is.

    JMO?
    T$

  • avatar
    BigOldChryslers

    “the current era of … tougher drivetrain components”

    Tougher drivetrain components? One could drive said big-block Lancer to the track, beat the snot out of it all weekend, then drive it to work on Monday morning, no problem.

    The design cycle is:
    1. make it work
    2. make it cheap
    3. too cheap, it broke. Go back to step 1.

    Auto manufacturers are getting very good at making components just good enough to get the job done. Nothing is overbuilt relative to its intended use. I fail to see how this translates into tougher drivetrain components.

    • 0 avatar
      Moparman426W

      @Bigoldchryslers, you are correct. Chrysler’s 727, as well as ford’s C6 and the GM turbo 400 were all heavy duty units that could handle an ungodly amount of torque. Same with the chrysler 833 4 speed and ford’s toploader. Chrysler’s 8-3/4 rear end was also very strong, a close second to the ford 9 incher.
      Gm’s 12 bolt rear and M-22 4 speed were fairly stout, but not compared to the ford and chrysler stuff, which was why many GM racers swapped ford and chrysler rears and manual transmissions in their cars. Chrysler 6 pack and hemi powered cars used the Dana 60 rear end, which was a 1 ton truck unit.

  • avatar
    hidrotule2001

    Where is the Panther Love?

    Granted they stopped production last year, but I’d say a late model Crown Vic has the space for the the Mustang GT’s 5.0, or if you wanted to go crazy there are always a slew of parts from the GT500, and there are plenty of bolt-on parts for the old Modular V8′s.

    • 0 avatar
      28-cars-later

      I’ve seen the 5.4 Triton done in those but nothing bigger. I think the Panther doesn’t have the sleeper appeal simply because people expect it to be able to lay some tire down, unlike your Geo Metro/Corolla/Camry types. Personally I’m waiting for some kind of sick EcoBoost type Panther mod or kit, I’m surprised this hasn’t yet been done.

    • 0 avatar
      potatobreath

      Does the truck V10 fit?

      • 0 avatar
        Educator(of teachers)Dan

        On one of the Panther forums someone once claimed that theoretically any of the Modular motors should fit, although it’s not a “mod” motor, I’d love one of Ford’s big honking diesels under the hood of a Town Car… TORQUE RULES!

  • avatar
    SuperACG

    Jetta SportWagon with 2.0 TFSI

    Newest Beetle with 3.2 V6 from Audi TT

  • avatar
    ktm

    Anything that uses forced induction stock is a potential sleeper.

    I owned a B5 S4 for a while. The biturbo 2.7L engine was bullet proof; I wish the same could be said for the stock K03 turbos though. However, isntall a pair of K04s, tuning by Giac or AMS, better intercoolers, and you were pushing well over 400 AWD horsepower and torque…..at the wheels. Do this in a wagon and it is the ultimate sleeper. I surprised many an M3 and M5 as well as quite a few AMGs, Porsches and Corvettes.

    Turbo-diesel pick-up trucks are also sleepers unless you are in the know. There are quite a few that terrorize the drag strips.

  • avatar
    mazder3

    Take one black steel-wheeled Nissan Cube.
    Add the four-wheel independent suspension, torque-vectoring all-wheel drive and turbo fourbanger from the Juke.
    Scare hamsters all day long.

  • avatar
    KitaIkki

    662hp Shelby GT500 with Mustang V6 body parts

  • avatar
    zamoti

    Current Mitsubishi Galant. Just as boring as a Camry, less known. Forget the turbo, go NOS. I mean, it’s probably a piece of trash anyway, at least you could just take your gear out once you melt the engine and then move on to a Suzuki anything.

    Isuzu Oasis?

  • avatar
    GoesLikeStink

    Ford Flex with GT500 drivetrane? Not a minivan but close enough, and with black tinted windows no one could see that the interior has been removed. Who would think they could lose a race to a mom truck?

  • avatar
    itsgotvtak

    I’ve seen 1st gen CR-Vs get a vtec swap and boost… Definitely something sleeper about a 12 second chick mobile.

  • avatar
    "scarey"

    I actually saw an Iowa sheriff’s Crown Vic with a V-10 in it WAY before Ford put it in the Econolines or pickups or anything else. He had stopped to see if I needed help, and I needed a jump. He didn’t want me to see under his hood, but I peeked. I counted 10 one-barrel carbs. He confirmed it was a V-10. And not a Dodge motor, either. Holy Cow ! I don’t think I was hallucinating.

  • avatar
    Moparman426W

    I don’t understand the “and tougher drivetrain component” part. Today engineers have to take things like cost, weight and fuel economy into consideration. Drivetrains are engineered to meet the requirements of the vehicle they are intended for. The transaxles and axles of a Kia Reo or Camry certainly won’t have the extra beef built in like the drivetrains of the cars from the big 3 during the 60′s and 70′s, especially Ford and Chrysler products.
    A transmission with the beef of a 727 or C6 in a Rio or Camry would weigh almost as much as the engine, not to mention the reciprocating mass. There wouldn’t even be enough space for such a trans. I also don’t understand the part about the old timers being wrong. Which part were they wrong about?

  • avatar
    Sylvilagus Aquaticus

    It’s old, 1971, but this is a real trickster.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KnqdIsBJT0A&feature=related

    Supervan (the original) was road legal. 5 liter Gurney-Weslake mounted midships.

    Supervan2 was even faster. Supervan3…hang on.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=xdDeL5KSKPw

  • avatar
    Sylvilagus Aquaticus

    Early RX-7, 1650 hp (alleged) 427 SBC.
    Not as squirrely as you’d think.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • J & J Sutherland, Canada
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India