By on May 3, 2012

A significant detour on the way to work had me spotting this – a modestly priced house on a busy arterial road in a working-class area nestled between two notorious neighborhoods in Toronto. Jane-Finch and Black Creek.

Anyone still bemoaning the Bentley EXP 9 F and invoking the “authenticity” or vehicles like the Arnage Red Label should take a long hard look at this photo. Somebody has purchased a second-hand Arnage. I am willing to bet that based on the dwelling and the modified Mustang V6 sitting next to it that they are not “to the manor born”, do not wear bespoke suits and are more “G’d Up” than “GQ”. The history and provenance of the 6.75 L engine or its hand assembly in Crewe probably means nothing. Meanwhile, many of the wealthiest people I know drive cars that are old, modest or some combination of the above.

Does your car, and by extension, the badge on your hood really define you? I’ve long maintained that anyone who believes so (and is defined largely by brands and other worthless intangibles) is hopelessly lost and lacking an identity grounded in things that matter, like deeds or relationships. Now I seem to have even more concrete proof.

Or maybe this guy just doesn’t believe in real estate and has different priorities than most.

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94 Comments on “More Proof That What You Drive Does Not Define You...”


  • avatar
    McGilligan

    Or it’s owned by the “manor born” landlord surveying his rental property holdings.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      Complete with a tux, high hat, and monocles. :-)

      But speaking of people with serious priority mismangement, you see some pretty sweet rides parked next to the trailers while driving by the trailer parks around here.

  • avatar
    28-cars-later

    Priorities. Some people have them, some don’t.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      Hey now, what does buying a car that’s worth as much as a house while renting an apartment have to do with….. oh. Wait.

      • 0 avatar
        replica

        Because houses, those are a safe bet. They never go down in value or actually cause the owner to lose money as property taxes rise, the cost of interest after X years runs past the market value of the house by the end of the mortgage, and other various experiences.

        Yeah. I’d rather have a fun car a lose a little bit of money, rather than buy into the illusion of home ownership again.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        Oh got it… had to put the sarcasm goggles on there.

      • 0 avatar
        jandrews

        Thank you Replica.

        It’s amazing that 5 years after the housing bubble blew conventional wisdom into the upper stratosphere that people still preach the “home ownership is important” line.

        Suckers amuse me.

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        When the housing market crashes 30%, it’s like an event that will happen once every 30 years. It will take then next 10 years to slowly recover.

        With cars, if you only lose 30% in the first 3 years, you must had made a extremely good choice. Guess when will the value recover.

      • 0 avatar
        jandrews

        wsn – you’re assuming the value comes back to the house, which is a suspect assertion at best.

        Property tax, cost of maintenance, cost of maintenance materials, time to do your maintenance (calculated at your hourly rate from work), homeowner’s insurance, etc. all conspire to remove value without the owner even noticing.

        The idea that houses “appreciate” is a fallacy. At best, most people break even. They just do the math wrong and compare the purchase price with the selling price. Selling price is always higher due to inflation if nothing else. (And that’s another thing – IF your house recovers it’s former “value” 10 years later, that’s ten years inflation has had to decrease the buying power of that money.) People conveniently forget to factor in cost to own. For some reason, everyone remembers to do this with cars, but not with homes. Maybe it’s because “everyone knows” houses are investments?

        It’s a lie. Houses are, at best, non-depreciating assets. Often, as Replica pointed out, they’ depreciate just like everything else. “Return on investment” with housing only occurs with rental properties where another party is subsidizing or covering the costs of ownership.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        You have to live somewhere.

        Accepting for the sake of discussion that home ownership is a poor investment.

        The alternative isn’t a better investment. You can’t live in stocks and bonds.

        The alternative is paying rent which is mathematically guaranteed to lose every cent you put into it.

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        jandrews, you are right in that the increase of property value is caused by inflation. But you have ignored some important points:

        1) Cost of rent as pointed out by Dan
        2) The average nominal gain of real estate is roughly 7%/year since WW2. Far greater than CPI.
        3) The leverage factor of using a mortgage. As long as your rate is lower than 7%, you are coming out ahead more when you have a higher ratio of mortgage debt.

  • avatar
    mitchw

    Or perhaps the gentlemen are being entertained this afternoon by imported sex workers? Hmmm?

  • avatar
    tparkit

    Because the Jane-Finch shlithole is a joint creation of the Canadian federal government, the Province of Ontario, and the city, there’s a good chance those cars were paid for by you.

  • avatar
    bd2

    This is pretty common in SoCal.

    • 0 avatar
      AJ

      Just what I was going to say. A lot of really nice cars in front of apartments…

      • 0 avatar
        Yuppie

        I have seen a Porsche GT3 parked in a shared carport in some crappy apartment complex.

      • 0 avatar
        jandrews

        I’m sorry, but I’ve never understood this…what does it matter if the nice vehicle is parked in front of an apartment?

        Home ownership means nothing aside from personal feelings. Houses are not the investment conventional wisdom and the banking/real estate markets would like you to believe.

        Wise up: Home ownership as an “investment” is a scam:

        http://www.freemoneyfinance.com/2007/07/is-it-better-to.html

        The modern economy requires mobility. Residency in houses is a much more difficult anchor to shed than an apartment lease, and very market sensitive.

        Own houses as rental properties if you want, but don’t get caught up in the investment bullshit.

        So again: What does it matter where someone with a nice car lives, if they’re ok with their residency?

  • avatar
    SV

    I don’t think a car defines someone, but it does reflect on them to an extent. Buying a used late-model Bentley while living in an average apartment complex transmits certain messages about, I don’t know, fiscal responsibility or something. But no, overall, what you drive isn’t a defining trait. (unless you drive a lifted F-350, then you probably are a douchebag)

    Also, I don’t think that Mustang is modified, it’s just a 2013 model.

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    Maybe it’s because I’ve listened to a little to much James May, but I rather liked that old Rolls from “Manor Born”

  • avatar
    frizzlefry

    If my wife was not always bugging me for a yard and more space I would totally stay in our nice 790 sqft condo and drive an RS4. But in marriage compromises must be made :)

    • 0 avatar
      jandrews

      By the same token as not buying a house above:

      Don’t get married.

      Commitments in modern America are just leverage for your employer to use against you.

  • avatar
    dwford

    The car does not define you, but many people believe otherwise. Usually they are people of more modest means looking to live larger than their budget. After 6 years of selling cars, I can tell you that poor people are hell bent on getting a luxury brand at all costs – to park next to their government subsidized apartment, while people with money are buying the least expensive car that meets their needs. That’s a generalization, but largely true.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Also, while a nice home has long been a status symbol, discrimination kept many people out of the good neighborhoods, thus they turned to cars for status symbols instead. While the equal rights movement made such discrimination and segregation illegal, the importance of having a nice car has remained.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        I think rap videos glorifying the inner city drug culture had a lot to do with it as well…

      • 0 avatar
        DearS

        I;m from a poor neighborhood. I dont think this is exclusively a poor people issue. Many folk have a different idea of status, hence the housing crisis, creditcards, and expensive colleges. A new midsize car can be more expensive then a used luxury car. Most middle class people go for New and the status that brings, rather then an a (second hand) car.

        We own 3 BMWs and not for status (much). Just a great car. Many poor know a new Corolla cant touch a 15 yr old BMW (E39 especially sells here), and a used Corolla = I’m poor. I think everyone has issues and we are more similar then different, on average imo.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Your vehicle shouldn’t personally define you, but it certainly reflects on you.

    You were just testing the Raptor. You don’t think people saw you differently while driving that instead of your usual Mazda?

    Did you feel any different?

  • avatar
    Numbers_Matching

    During my visits to this fabled city I’ve always noticed the very strong presence of secondary market upscale cars (especially German ones)and the almost underground nature by which it operates. I’m told that the very high immigrant population – especially from eastern Europe – drives this demand.

    They also tend to drive the *crap* out of them…

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Buy what you want, drive how you like; people are going to read into your decisions whatever the heck they want to. If we were defined by every Tom, Dick, and Harry’s opinion we wouldn’t know what’s going on. It’s a fools errand to try and project that “perfect” persona.

  • avatar
    supersleuth

    I don’t mind being defined by my car. I’m a rational person and I drive a (base, manual) Honda Fit, which is a very rational car.

  • avatar
    Feds

    Yup, that’s a who… er… Common Bawdy House.

  • avatar
    Contrarian

    Maybe. Sometimes. I just went from a old A8 to a new Sonata. Why? The new Sonata does most things the old 8 did, some of them better, and some things it didn’t do at all like Bluetooth link – For a lot less. Caveat: I try not to think of all the things a NEW A8 would do.

    Anyway, which one defines me? Maybe neither, maybe both. I think they define more my state of mind and situation at the time I got them, but not so much me.

  • avatar
    underachieva

    Maybe he’s just paying a visit to his mistress at her apt for a couple hours.
    He bought her the mustang to keep her adorable little mouth closed.

  • avatar
    YYYYguy

    The car you drive defines less who you are and more about what/who you aspire to be.

    I aspire to be practical, and I drive a Honda Fit.

    If the above speculations are true, this person has aspirations of wealth and to display to others his/her wealth. He/she may be indeed wealthy, with debt paid off and cash in the bank. Hard to tell by just the car and the building though.

    Different strokes for different folks.

  • avatar
    zerofoo

    Ahem – 6 3/4 liters – not 6.75.

    It sounds better pronounced “six and three quarter litres”.

  • avatar
    George B

    My girlfriend says I’d look good in a Mercedes. Not going to happen. However, I’m willing to compromise and buy a used Infiniti, black please, to get proper RWD luxury car proportions at a reasonable price. If she persists in trying to get me to buy a high maintenance car, I may have to trade her in for a new girlfriend with lower maintenance costs.

    The car does send a message about it’s driver. Buying fleet/rental type cars new tells others that you don’t understand depreciation. Driving a car way beyond your income signals that you’re careless with money. Driving a well maintained car for more than a decade signals that you’re frugal or cheap and boring depending on one’s perspective.

    • 0 avatar
      naterator

      I had a girlfriend that told me that, too. I agreed and showed her a ’71 250SE. It wasn’t what she had in mind. Just as well, she was out of my price range anyway. The girl, not the car.

  • avatar
    ReturnofSAM

    I think you just proved that what you drive does reflect you as you’ve read into the all the intricacies of this owners personal life based on two cars and real estate. A bit harsh but true.

  • avatar
    david42

    Mmm. As far as the picture, goes, we can’t really say who owns the Bentley and whether he lives there.

    But to the bigger question: I suspect that anyone who reads TTAC regularly considers their car to be an important projection of who they are. Some of us may want to the world to know “I’m a rational human being” and are therefore proud to own a Honda Fit. Some of us want the world to know “I love driving” and are proud to own an overpowered rwd whatever. (Me included.)

    And some of us, surely, want the world to know that we’re rich (or at least want the world to think we’re rich), and drive a…. insert your personal prejudice here.

  • avatar
    dougjp

    That picture is so “defining” I’m sure the cops are tracing the address as we speak. The only outstanding question I can think of is, which driver is the “buyer” and which driver is the “seller”?

  • avatar
    SunnyvaleCA

    Here in the Silicon Valley, where houses go for more than $500 per square foot in many zip codes, expensive cars parked next to shacks is perfectly “normal.” A car that is 6 feet wide and 15 feet long would cost $45000 using the square foot metric. And, here, a house with that cost might be 40 or more years old and need serious levels of repair.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    With my assortment of fedoras, I’d look quite splendid in that Bentley. It belongs in MY garage…at least I’d appreciate it.

    Oh well, I’ll just wait for the next Impala…

    • 0 avatar
      WaftableTorque

      That Red Label is cheaper than you think, you can find them on Autotrader for less than $45,000 for a low mileage 1999-2002.

      In Edmonton I see a lot of 10 year old Range Rovers on dubs with new plates driven by tanned twenty-something nubiles wearing hooped gold earrings, a Coco Chanel handbag, and Ugg boots. I hate to think what their first repair bill will be like.

      • 0 avatar
        hgrunt

        In LA, the equivalent of that are early model W220 Mercedes that need new air struts. They’re very cheap to buy, fairly reliable all told, but expensive to service. The air struts are something like $800 a piece.

  • avatar
    korvetkeith

    Well I’ve had a corvette, a jeep, a jacked up Chevy, a 330k mile aurora I bought for $900 and put 120k on, and an XJR. Obviously I am a balding, mid life crisis having, gold chain wearing, young active lifestyle living, redneck douchbad, frugalista, who is also a sophisticated Anglophile trying to impress people so they’ll think I’m richer than I am.

    One things for sure. I’d rather party with the Bentley owning apartment dweller than a judgemental hollier than thow auto journalist.

  • avatar
    Sinistermisterman

    You see similar things in the UK. Not far from where I used to live, in a particularly grubby council estate you’d find one or two houses (rented off the local council for stupidly low rates) with a Range Rover Sport, brand new 5 Series BMW or other high spec car parked out front. Considering the fact that to get a council property you are means tested, one has to wonder where all this surplus, non banked, non taxed, non traceable cash comes from… I wonder…

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    If you can afford a house in Jane & Finch (a house, not a condo, rental unit, etc, but an actual house) you’re actually probably well off. Maybe not Bentley well-off, but Toronto is Toronto, and property isn’t cheap anywhere within the city, nor in lots of areas around it.

    That said, this could be some Kingsway or Bloor West Village caller, for any sorts of reasons (landlord, lawyer, sugar, baller, etc). It’s also not too far from some rather expensive areas around Scarlett Rd.

  • avatar
    GusTurbo

    I feel bad for the owner of that Hyundai XG350, sitting next to his neighbor’s flashy new Mustang.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Meh, whatever.

    Not everyone is into the whole “must have immaculate suburban mcmansion’ crap. I absolutely hate yardwork, and I was quite pleased to buy a 170yo shack with a 3400sqft garage in a middle-class neighborhood a dozen years ago. I am even more happy to have a nice collection of cars and tools in that garage that approaches in value what I paid for the house in the first place. Crappiest house in the ‘hood, by far the nicest cars. Yup, priorities.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Judging someone based on their car would be like judging them based on their toaster, quite silly.

    Some people buy what they do just to get around, we’re not all a bunch of teens that wish to express ourselves through materials as opposed to simple dialogue.

    The only people that I judge are the ones that want to be judged, the ones with fart cans or “Ghetto” wheels. I usually just say that they’re the ones with goofed priorities. Some people like these things and thats fine, but theres those who just want to “impress” and they’re the ones that I openly mock.

    I don’t mind people that try to look fancy as long as they’re consistant, don’t buy $1000 rims for your Buick but shop at the Dollar Tree.

  • avatar
    hgrunt

    I think some people place far more emphasis on it than others. I suppose it depends on social circles, too. Peoples’ eyes bug out when I tell them I have two cars, even after I explain one of the cars cost less than a Macbook to buy and is old enough to buy beer.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      In MY part of the country, money talks and bullsh!t walks.

      So it isn’t unusual to see a $1.2M Marathon motorhome parked outside of an otherwise middle-class home. It doesn’t have to be a Marathon of course, any motorhome will do, even a Winnebago or Southwind. No motorhome is cheap to own and insure. It takes real money.

      Or, there is the variety of cars, trucks, bikes and RVs that someone may have parked outside of their McMansion as an indication of how much money they have available for ‘toys’. If you got it, flaunt it.

      But the chuckle of the day goes to several of my neighbors and friends who choose to drive a Prius (for austerity and I-feel-the-pain-of-the-99%) but also own an F150 and a Camry or CUV like an Enclave, and trade for new vehicles every year or so, or whenever they get a wild hair.

      Clearly, those are the people with money since nothing they buy is financed. They also keep a very low profile. Hence the Prius.

      But maybe that’s the way it should be since I have never seen a hearse with a U-Haul behind it.

  • avatar
    supremebrougham

    I choose to drive rather conservative cars, because I am conservative to a fault, and, in addition to being somewhat tight, (not cheap, tight) I find it makes me happy. But that’s just me…

    This brings to mind something I shared on Facebook a few weeks ago. While visiting Saginaw, MI, I found a beautiful, all original 1984 Olds Ninety-Eight Regency Brougham that was for sale. I stopped and took a lot of pics of it. I shared one on my FB page with the comment “If anyone would like to get me an early birthday present, this would do nicely”. After a few various comments about my (questionable) taste in cars, the subject came up about what might become of it, and I said that it saddened me to think that it would probably wind up in the ‘hood with oversized wheels and an obnoxious stereo, driven by youth in a way that makes them look like idiots. Well, I had quite the rebuttal come from a few friends, accusing me of being judgmental, racist and just plain terrible! I never once brought race into it, or said that living that kind of lifestyle made one an idiot. I did say it makes people of any race or background that chooses to glamorize thug life “look” like an idiot.

    And that’s why I like conservative cars!

    • 0 avatar
      multicam

      I love it when people expose their own preoccupation with race when you never brought it up in the first place. I think they’re the ones with the problem.

      I have the same standards for everyone. If I see a 2010+ Camaro with a custom pink two-toned paint job, every possible trim item replaced with chrome, and literally 30″ spinning rims on a 6 or so inch lift, I think you’re an attention-seeking fool, whether you’re male, female, gay, straight, Muslim, atheist, black, white, brown or overweight (and for the record, I couldn’t see the driver- 5% tint).

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      When it comes to racism, I always say “let the races speak for themselves”. Either that Olds will be goofed up, or a collector will buy it and drive it on Sundays to car shows as a future classic.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Of course deeds and relationships are more important than cars.

    Strangers don’t know about your deeds. All they have to go on is your appearance.

    The wrong appearance is asking people to make your life harder. They will oblige you.

    Would you go to an interview wearing a wife beater and a 3 day beard?

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      I once interviewed an applicant who came straight from the woods, dressed in camo and covered in fresh deer blood from head to toe. I offered him the job, but he had better options.

  • avatar
    Hank

    You car only defines you if you have so little depth to your character and achievements that you must make monthly payments on a pseudo-identity.

  • avatar
    carlisimo

    I knew a guy who drove cars “above his station”.

    He worked at a body shop. If an expensive car came in and was totalled by insurance, he’d sometimes buy it and fix it. Managed to drive some very nice cars for less than $10,000.

  • avatar
    romanjetfighter

    who cares
    people feel threatened when they see normal people with goods that are normally reserved for what they feel are high class so they have to invent narratives like “they wish they were rich”

    stop being so old money and smug
    its a car. with a nice engine. no one cares.

    i know rich ppl who drive shit cars on purpose so they can tell everyone how stealthywealthy they are and how everyone else is just pretending to be rich. they do this by having STANFORD ALUMNI license plate frames and UNIVERSITY OF ST ANDREWS stickers on their crappy cars. ugh…

  • avatar
    Speed3

    Because why WOULDN’T you get a Bentley Arnage?

  • avatar
    ranwhenparked

    This isn’t that hard to figure out at all. The Arnage was released well over a decade ago, and the very oldest of them are now routinely going for as low as $35,000 second hand. As the typical midsize family sedan is now running in the high 20s/low 30s when reasonably equipped, this puts them within reach of moderate income earners.

    Heck, most new full-size pickups cost more than that, and I’ll bet you wouldn’t have given that house a second glance if it had a $50,000 F-250 Super Duty parked next to that Mustang.

    However, as with all Rolls-Royce/Bentley products, keep in mind that the initial purchase price is only the beginning of what its going to cost you as old age sets in.

    • 0 avatar
      28-cars-later

      Very true point, unless one learns to do his own work, or as much is reasonably possible. A car is just a car after all Yugo To Rolls.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I don’t know how true the ‘car is just a car’ thing is in this case. An ex-gf’s father restored a TR6, maintained a fleet of Rabbit diesel pickups for his tree farm, and generally had resources to draw on for anything he couldn’t handle. The brakes on his Silver Shadow failed and the elements claimed the car before he could find an expert that could repair them. At one point he was looking at having the RR flat-bedded to an expert hundreds of miles away, but he waited too long and the humidity of central Virginia turned it into a tetanus gilded sponge. This later car may have shed some of the moronic flakiness from the braking and suspension systems that was present in the Silver Shadow and Silver Spirit, but that doesn’t mean that common sense will keep it running.

  • avatar
    Franzouse

    I’m from a family of car snobs who go out of their way to drive crappy cars, as if having a new shiny car were undignified or something.
    One story I fondly remember was 8 years ago when my Dad held a very high position in the French ministry of Foreign Affairs. It was a saturday and I went to meet him at his office so we could drive off to our country house. I get there expecting to see our -at the time- perfectly acceptable Pug 406 Wagon but instead see him smoking his cigarillos in our super old and krusty 505 wagon waiting for me. As I got there, one of his underlings drove by in a decked-out Pug 206CC; he saw us and was so shocked that he stalled his car. Having the boss standing next to a vehicle more commonly found in Mali was too much for the poor guy and he left super embarrassed.
    When I asked him, why he’d decided to display our shame-mobile to his co-workers his response was very clear: “only the boss can afford to drive around in a car like this and I love seeing my employees cringe in shame for me”

  • avatar
    baggins

    I am a sr. exec at a small company funded by venture capital (yes I live in Silicon Valley)

    Part of my job is to meet with current and prospective investors. I was at such a meeting last year in my 2002 Taurus.

    This Taurus was in fine shape, and with the 24V V6m not as terrible to drive as one might think. I fit the seats pretty well, and it had given me 9 years of low cost, trouble free service.

    Anyhow, I park my car outside the office of an investor, and as I walk in, survey the parking lot. 40 or so cars, NOT A SINGLE DOMESTIC. As I shut the trunk, one of our investors drove by in her MDX and waved. I cringed a little bit.

    After the meeting I went back to the office, and looked around the parking lot. I am the 3rd highest paid person on site, but had probably the 3rd least valuable ride.

    I quickly bought a 2011 Accord. It does steer better than my Taurus, and gets better mileage.

    But now I look practical, not cheap.

    And if 40 out of 40 people at my investors office complex drive imports, why am I in a Ford? I liked driving a Ford, because Bay Area libs hate domestics as part of their hip persona (the cool cars here are Prius, Audi, volvo and mini/BMW here)

    But you gotta look the part…

    • 0 avatar
      Roberto Esponja

      You haven’t read The Millionaire Next Door, have you…?

      • 0 avatar
        baggins

        No, what does it say about this situation?

      • 0 avatar
        Roberto Esponja

        From the Wikipedia book summary:

        “According to the authors, a common UAW (Under Accumulator of Wealth) drives a current model car, purchased new, and may have financed it on credit. PAWs (Prodigious Accumulators of Wealth) rarely purchase new model cars and are less likely to own foreign or luxury vehicles. An example from the book details a UAW that spent roughly 60 hours researching, negotiating and purchasing a new car. In the end, while the car was purchased “near dealer cost,” in the long run the UAW’s time and money could have been more efficiently spent creating wealth rather than collecting possessions notorious for depreciating in value. The authors contrast the story with a PAW who decided that the pride of owning a brand new car wasn’t worth the $20,000 price difference.”

    • 0 avatar
      FuzzyPlushroom

      Should’ve bought a new Fusion, I think. A ten-year-old Taurus may say something about cheapness, but a Fusion will seem like a pretty good car to anyone who drove an Accord/Camry/Altima in the day you bring ‘em to lunch.

      I think I’d have kept the Taurus, but its time would have come to an end eventually… and I never resist an opportunity for subtle subversion.

      • 0 avatar
        baggins

        2011 Fusion was too small, Accord is really quite spacious and with a lower cowl more upright windshield than most mid sizers.

        Also, I was little chafed (but not surprised) by the incredibly low value of my Taurus. It was in great shape (the guy at the lot said “I cant say anything bad” about this car after inspecting it) 60K miles, and I fought to get 3K for it.

        If someone got it off the lot for 4.5K, they got a hell of a bargain

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      baggins: “But you gotta look the part…”

      I agree, and in some industries, like banking, it’s imperative.

      My son and his wife work for the largest bank of Japan, formerly they worked in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan, and now they work stateside.

      Because of their respective senior positions, and for appearances sake, the bank has furnished them each with a Made in Japan luxury car.

      But after work and on weekends, he drives a 4X4 pickup truck (RAM) and she drives a 4X4 Jeep Wrangler Sahara.

  • avatar
    NorthwestT

    I know you don’t care, but it’s “manner”

  • avatar
    Illan

    I say that its dependent on the “Market” the individual is living and the lifestyle he or she has.

    but i just cant blame anyone having a comfortable, powerful car. a car while is a depreciating value for some of us we spend more time in our cars than in own home. i agree on people who buy cars because of the barand and so not take into value what the car really is.

  • avatar
    wsn

    I am defined by my house, because I designed every inch of it. My car (when new) costs 3.3% of my house price. Just a few house down, a guy’s two cars would cost 25% of his (much inferior) house.

    • 0 avatar
      WaftableTorque

      The irony of the caption photo is that we’re judging the owner based on the home they live in AND the car they drive. Any time we have incongruity, we have an opening for comedy.

  • avatar
    smallenginesmakemesad

    2 stories –

    1. A couple of years back, I worked out that I now have more invested in the cars in my driveway than we spent on our first house (forget about inflation). It was a big mistake to say this out-loud to my wife.I have not been allowed to buy a car since…

    2. My parents have an expensive home (probably $3-4m worth). Until last year my Dad was still driving the same Toyota he bought in 1990. He just bought a new C Class Mercedes and plans to hang on to that for another 20 years.

  • avatar
    Monty

    As far as I’m concerned, if a person can afford something, I’m not going to criticise their choice. Seriously, if a person buys a blinged out F-350 instead of a 10 year old Bentley, what’s the difference. Even if the F-350 never hauls a single bit of cargo, why are other people so offended? Our consumer society, and in fact the entire global economy, is based on people continually purchasing goods, and we’re conditioned from the start to covet aspirational goods. It’s no big shocker that individuals choose to go into debt for cars, houses, toys and vacations – it’s part of our DNA.

    As I’ve aged, I’ve become less inclined to chase after perceived status, but some people never learn the lesson and stay deep in debt throughout their life. Again, if that’s the choice made, so be it.

    What I find fascinating are the reactions of other people. We all judge without knowing the entire story. Maybe the Bentley was an inheritance, or maybe the apartment dweller felt the need for a luxury item to feel better about their address. Perhaps somebody’s grandparent was visiting, or maybe it’s the local drug dealer’s car. We don’t know the background, so most of us have created a narrative to fit our own prejudices, which is far more enlightening than the photograph itself.


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