By on April 16, 2012

Kizashi apparently means “omen”, sign or “warning” – it also means “something great is coming”, but the only thing on Suzuki’s American horizons is a bleak future.

Suzuki sales have been dismal. The brand was down two percent last month, despite surging car sales. Suzuki has also consistently lost dealers since 2005, shedding 12 percent of its sales network in 2011 alone. Five years ago, the company moved over 100,000 units in the United States – in 2011, it was barely one quarter of their 2005 figure.

One dealer told Automotive News that 60 percent of dealers sell 5 or fewer new cars per month. With an aging lineup and a vague new product rollout schedule, Suzuki’s management appears to be focused on cutting costs rather than digging their heels in for the long-term. Reporting customer satisfaction data to J.D. Power has been canned by management, and the brand’s Twitter and Facebook pages are dormant. Advertising campaigns at both the regional and national level have been similarly lacking.

The drastic drop in sales since 2005 could also be correlated to the rise of Hyundai and Kia, whose products have made enormous strides in the last 5 years. It may have been somewhat rational to buy a Suzuki SX4 or Grand Vitara over a comparable Korean car, but nowadays, one would have to have a powerful reality distortion field to make that choice.

Suzuki’s future in America is even more tragic given that the brand’s best car, the Swift, isn’t even sold here. The Swift has been praised by numerous outlets, including EVO and Top Gear, two British snob rags of the highest order. At the Geneva Auto Show, the brand displayed a 75 mpg concept that used an 800cc engine and weighed 1600 lbs. If that’s not engineering ingenuity, not much else is. The Kizashi is a competent entrant into the mid-size category, but about to be left behind by the competition. The SX4 and Grand Vitara are hopelessly outdated, and the brand badly needs an injection of new product. About the only saving grace Suzuki has right now is India, but as Ed pointed out in his bit about Suzuki’s fortunes in the sub-continent, the brand could re-position itself to take Subaru’s low-cost, rugged AWD niche, now that Subaru is becoming what Audi once was. The SX4 AWD is the cheapest new car with AWD, and there’s even a small but high-quality aftermarket for it. Even if Suzuki goes under in America, they will always have their motorcycles – and I’ll have a source of cheap vehicles for my future rally campaign (with the low price of an orphan vehicle, buying spares and performance upgrades might be feasible).

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72 Comments on “Time To Start The Suzuki America Death Watch?...”


  • avatar
    PintoFan

    Even if they disappear, nobody will notice.

    Suzuki occupies roughly the same niche as Mitusbishi: selling garbage with a fake halo of Japanese car quality to people with less than perfect credit. Now that the Koreans have shown that super low budget doesn’t have to mean terrible, there is no real market left for either company. The difference is that Mitsubishi has the resources to keep soldiering on in the U.S. market, regardless of the results.

    Building a 1600 lb concept car isn’t “innovative,” either. Any car company can build some flimsy subcompact out of plastic and carbon fiber that it has no intention of mass producing or marketing.

    • 0 avatar
      YYYYguy

      Wow. My wife and I own a 2010 GV we purchased pre-owned for a song in 2011. We paid cash for it and have stellar credit. Ours has been quite reliable thus far. Not sure there is a reality distortion here.

      Suzuki can still be a good buy if the price is right. New? Not so much…a well cared for used model however is a different story.

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        Suzuki is consistently near the bottom of virtually every reliability survey, competing with such eminent paragons of quality as Volkswagen and Land Rover. The fact that your one year old GV had already endured massive depreciation is just another side effect of that.

        Beyond the supposed “deal” that you got on the price, I have no idea why you would have bought it over any of the competition. Even the antique Escape is a better car.

      • 0 avatar
        YYYYguy

        Suzuki’s Korean rebadged products were very problematic. Not so with their Japanese designed/built vehicles. Historically, those J built models have been average reliability or better, I believe.

        The massive depreciation is certainly a reflection of the fact that most folks don’t know the diff between the K and J built Suzuki products. This works well for those of us purchasing a J built Suzuki used and on the cheap.

        We bought it because it drives well, is a competent utility vehicle, historical reliability average or better, and price was minimal even after you factor in potential unscheduled maint. If they stick around in the states, heck maybe the warranty will be worth something. :)

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        “Suzuki is consistently near the bottom of virtually every reliability survey, competing with such eminent paragons of quality as Volkswagen and Land Rover. ”

        That was due to Suzuki selling rebadged Daewoos. Now that Daewoo Lacettis are being sold as Chevrolet Cruzes instead of Suzuki Forenzas, it is Chevrolet with Consumer Reports’ worst rated car in its class instead of Suzuki.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        YYYYguy,
        The fact that you bought your Suzuki used and do not consider new ones a good buy is exactly the problem. The question I have is whether you like your Grand Vitara enough to pay MSRP for it.

      • 0 avatar
        YYYYguy

        “The fact that you bought your Suzuki used and do not consider new ones a good buy is exactly the problem. The question I have is whether you like your Grand Vitara enough to pay MSRP for it.”

        We did consider new, however stumbled across the used deal. In today’s market, probably wouldn’t buy new since Suzuki now has a death watch out on them. The last two companies that had a TTAC death watch out on them went belly up. :)

      • 0 avatar
        SeanS

        I’m glad to see someone else who enjoys their Grand Vitara.

        No credit problem here either. I have no idea what the other poster is talking about in regards to Suzuki selling so called “terrible junk.” It certainly isn’t true far as I (or my mechanic friend who shopped with me) know. And I definately preferred the GV to the Escape.

        The seats are really nice for long trips. Both they and the general touch of the vehicle were much more to my liking than vehicles like the Santa Fe or Tucson. (Yes, I did much of the “look at many things in or near that class” shuffle. )

        I do think Suzuki does a rather weak job of marketing in the U.S. though. But then, they are concentrating on emerging markets as opposed to a saturated sideways flowing one. Merely broadly speaking, in their place I’m not so sure I’d be doing so much differently atm. At least not in any way which might take attention away from my higher priority goals.

    • 0 avatar
      Wacko

      PintoFan
      What is garbage about suzuki??
      only the swift+ was garbage, only because it was a rebagged GM Aveo

      I had my 2010 SX4 awd for over 2 years and not one problem. They make quality cars, but are unknown cause they are abit on the small side for overweight americans.

    • 0 avatar
      28-cars-later

      I agree, but I think Mitsubishi and Suzuki should both just pull out of the market. I can’t remember the last time I knew someone who purchased a new Mitsu (or Suzuki for that matter). The overall North American auto market is too brand bloated as it is, one of these automakers should gracefully bow out while they can and concentrate on Asia.

    • 0 avatar
      dima

      I might agree with most of your points, except one. If you are talking about Japans build Suzuki, then they are pretty good. Talking from personal experience. Just sold 2006 Aerio SX AWD with 120,000 mile on the clock. Not a single issue. Still runs like a day it was purchased. Korean made, then this is a different story. Will miss Suzuki, I kind of like them.

  • avatar
    Caboose

    I still think their best bet is a tie-up with smart. All fortwos should get the Hayabusa engine and transmission.

    • 0 avatar
      tced2

      Maybe they could try the ultimate in “tie-ups” with Smart. How’d that work out for Chrysler?
      (Smart is of course a division of Diamler and Diamler doesn’t have a clue about operating outside of the “luxury” market).

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        Oh no, Daimler knew full well what they were doing when they purchased Chrysler. The eventual bankruptcy was the culmination of that plan.

      • 0 avatar
        tced2

        PintoFan, you’re giving Diamler too much credit. They thought they knew how to run a low-to-medium priced large volume car company (Chrysler). Chrysler was very profitable when Diamler bought Chrysler. They don’t know how to run this type of company. It’s debatable if their expensive cars are the world’s greatest.

  • avatar
    grzydj

    Their mismanaged tie-up with VW didn’t help matters much either. It’ll be another brand ran through the wringer and left for dead by GM.

    Also, does anybody know why comments are closed on the Nissan NV cargo van review?

  • avatar
    Robstar

    Suzuki, here is a recipe for success:

    1) Take 75mpg compact car, modify slightly.
    2) Drop in 1-2 busa engines
    3) Optionally add supercharger/turbo/both
    4) Sell for under $40k
    5) ???
    6) Profit!

    • 0 avatar
      aristurtle

      That GSXR4 concept they had a while back was interesting — 1.3L ‘Busa engine, less weight than a Mazda Miata.

      Suzuki never really tried to link their very successful motorcycle business to their car business in the US, and I feel like that really hurt them.

  • avatar
    Garak

    A car with a 800cc engine and 1600 lbs weight? That’s the fifth gen Alto from 2000, still in production in India. Getting 75 mpg from it shouldn’t be too difficult.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    Cheap cars at low volume is a strategy that is doomed to fail in the US. It can work elsewhere, but not here.

    It doesn’t make much sense for them to try to turn it around — the competition is too formidable, and their lineup isn’t well suited to serving the American market — which makes shutting down US operations seem inevitable. It’s more of a drag on operations than it is a benefit.

  • avatar
    nikita

    I test drove an SX4 a few years ago. The car was ok, at that price. It was the dealer experience that caused me to run away. I was worried about warranty (and after) support. It had all the ambiance of a “buy here, pay here” used car lot. This was in a major metropolitan market, Los Angeles! I’m surprised Suzuki car division is still operating in the US.

    The Koreans were smarter. Two local Hyundai dealerships started in the corner of big Chevy stores.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      The Suzuki dealership in our city is the same way. Bundled with Yamaha and Kia in a little rinky-dink building. Not a place I would want to sign a $16-25K purchase agreement in.

      Never seen a Kizashi on that lot, most of it is occupied by the Kias.

  • avatar
    GoFaster58

    Will we also see a death watch for Fiat since it’s not doing so good overseas and the US cannot sustain the company alone?

  • avatar
    alluster

    I say good riddance. Suzuki needs to cut their losses and quit the US market altogether. My only brush with them was in 2008 when i was starting to date my current girl friend. Too embarrassed to drive my 10 yr old Wrangler i checked out the Grand Vitara at a dealership closest to my house in NC at that time. The dealership folks were scums, very unprofessional, and rude once they realized I will be taking my money elsewhere. They ran my credit 6 times after I left. I had to call in a week later and warn them about running my credit anymore. No surprise the dealership (Donald Craig Suzuki) along with their Mazda lot shut their doors within a year. I am so glad I walked that day and refused to give in. The GV BTW was a great vehicle. $19,000 for a compact fully loaded stylish suv can’t be beat.

    Suzuki does make good small cars and are popular in 3rd world countries. I wish one of the Det 3 would partner with them to do an all out assault into the Japanese market.

  • avatar
    donatolla

    I very nearly bought a Kizashi a year ago. It is truely under appreciated, and no where near as small as all the reports say. It’s reasonably priced (at least in Canada) too…if you haggle. However, it really needs an power train transplant. The engine is underwhelming, and cvt is horrible. If you’re making a sport sedan, you don’t put a cvt in there. Once underway, it handles well, and is a good drivers car. I’m sure that it’s one of the best out there, but it will still fail. For me, a used tsx was a better buy.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      That’s a bummer. I haven’t driven a Kizashi but I’ve poked around a stationary one at the auto show. Fantastic interior, and reviews say it handles well. Seems to be the car all the hot & bothered Jetta MkIV and V fans should be buying now that the Mk VI no longer appeals to them. Apparently they are not, though.

  • avatar
    brettc

    Seeing a Suzuki is a rare occurrence for me. I think I’ve see more Routans on the road than any model of Suzuki I don’t know how they’ve survived this long in the U.S.

    A guy at work bought an SX4 after owning an Echo for several years. He complained to me about how bad the fuel economy is, which Fuelly agrees with. I know the AWD system knocks the economy down some, but Subarus get similar mileage with much larger AWD vehicles. The guy that bought the SX4 retired so I don’t know if he still has it but he was talking about getting rid of the SX4 and getting a Prius.

  • avatar
    VanillaDude

    It is better to cut losses and wait for another chance in the future to return than it is to keep flushing money away at a time when all auto manufacturers are fighting over crumbs.

    This is just not a good time to be producing cars that cannot find buyers. Suzuki is diversified enough to not get sunk by their auto make’s US misfortunes, but this is just not the time.

    Suzuki needs to fold it up, put it on hiatus and bring out new products in about a decade when this economy is growing again.

  • avatar
    icemilkcoffee

    Suzuki has got it all wrong here in the US. You see- Suzuki is a specialist car maker. They specialize in making tiny little cars. Their Kei cars lead the market in Japan. Their mini-minivans were once a part of the infrastructure in Asia (along with the samurais). That is their core competency. Instead of trying to go head to head with the big boys in the mid sized sedan segment, they should stick to their core competency and sell their Kei cars in the US. They would win for sure because there is noone else in that segment.

  • avatar
    dts187

    They just need to give up on the US completely. Their current lineup of vehicles isn’t terrible. They just aren’t relevant in today’s market. The SX4 was actually pretty decent in 2007 when compared to other cheap, small hatches. My girlfriend at the time was cross-shopping the SX4, Accent, and Rio. I would have taken the SX4 over both. I definitely can’t say the same thing now. Either way, I’m glad I talked her into spending a bit more on a Fit.

  • avatar
    hriehl1

    I only wish the automotive press was more even-handed (tho I think TTAC generally IS even-handed).

    In 2002 Suzuki released the Aerio… In SX hatchback form it was a very good mix of ecomomy, practicality and roominess. I bought one and it served flawlessly for 8 years and 150K miles… I was plenty satisfied given its $11,500 cost.

    When the Aerio was released it got generally tepid reviews, with the most criticism aimed at its “gimicky” electronic dash, busy ride and boxy styling.

    Fast forward 2-3 years and Honda releases the Fit. With almost the identical set of virtues and drawbacks as the Aerio, the critics fawned over how it broke new ground… the return of the small car. Now the electronic dash and the little triangular front windows are “cute” instead of “weird”.

    The only notable difference between the two was the logo on the grill and the real-world price (Honda being at least $2.5K more when comparably equipped). But Honda’s (big ad budget) entry was praised while Suzuki’s (tiny ad budget) was panned. I dropped AutoWeek and Car and Driver because I could no longer trust them and I don’t miss them a bit.

    Now… Suzuki’s current lineup is tired and they probably won’t make it. Their marketing is arguably the worst in the business. And yes, keeping the Swift from the U.S. seems a very poor choice. But let their epitaph also say they did not get a fair shake from those who claim even-handedness.

    • 0 avatar
      YYYYguy

      Agreed, very tired product offering today. We also purchased a Fit and the Aerio was in the running but didn’t have the magic seats. The Fit has also been dead reliable at 160k miles. Suzuki could probably use a bit more of an ad-budget.

    • 0 avatar
      bkmurph

      “Electronic dash”? The Aerio had a digital speedometer and a bar-graph tachometer. The Fit had actual gauges for both.

    • 0 avatar
      dima

      100% with you. Also bought 2006 Aerio SX AWD fully loaded for $16,500. Served me great until I sold it few month back. Not a hint of problems. Was great on snow and rain.
      When I first time saw Fit, I thought, Suzuki must be getting some kind of royalty for the Fit. In essence, both cars looked the same.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      I always thought the Aerio’s biggest issue was a really bad name. For starters, it wasn’t very easy to pronounce.

      But what was worse is that I have no doubt many prospective buyers confused it with the Chevy Aveo which was routinely panned as one of the cheapest (and not in a good way) new cars to buy.

    • 0 avatar
      SeanS

      “I only wish the automotive press was more even-handed”

      Yeah much of the automotive press rating vehicles is like watching judges at a figure skating contest. Unless the performers have bags on their heads, outside perceptions and biases often seep through.

  • avatar
    bsquarewi

    I personally would like to see Suzuki take a stab at a joint Auto / Motorsports dealer network. BMW won’t do it (to help their bike sales) and Honda doesn’t need to on either front. People simply don’t think of cars when they think Suzuki. Their motorsports lineup would actually help pull in customers who never would have thought about it before. “You mean I can get an AWD sedan for those snow and rain days and a new bike for under $30k and finance them both for the same low rate?”

    Now, when I say “I would like to see this” that is purely from a consumer standpoint. I realize that they function as distinct divisions and the logistics would be a nightmare, but as the article points out, one of these 2 will be out of the US soon which will also prove its own set of problems.

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    They had it right when their cars had Chevy badges on them. I see more old Metros still plodding along on the street more than any Suzuki. Who made that mistake? You can’t throw a rock in Japan without hitting a Suzuki. It’s an image problem all the way.

    It’s sad because the SX4, although dated, looks like a versatile car. The AWD 6spd was actually my favorite car (that I would seriously think of owning) of last years Chicago Auto Show.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    If not for the Hayabusa, I think Suzuki would be out of the motorcycle game here too. The GSXR lines have not been super competitive against all the new bikes that have come out recently, even with the recent updates. And they have whittled down the rest of their “sport” bike (which includes the Bandit- which is about as much of a sport bike as a Crown Vic is a sports sedan) to basically nothing, despite having some interesting offerings abroad (GSR750 to be specific).

    They had a lot of good bikes that they stopped selling as well (SV650/1000). The bike side is def in decline too.

    • 0 avatar
      GS650G

      Suzuki left the bike market for a year I understand, no new models. As you can see by my handle I’m a fan of their classic GS bikes which revolutionized the industry, but time moves on. Kawasaki is eating their lunch with the ZX series,.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    And the answer is: Suzuki in N. America becomes a single-model boutique car a-la Mini. Their hook will be to provide an “open source” to the car’s functions so people can turn the whole car into an app. It will come with a coupon for an iPad and 500 itunes downloads. And, the car will be fitted with half-a-dozen on board cameras so Generation Meh can broadcast their every driving moment to the world.

  • avatar
    Chipper Carb

    Really wouldn’t be surprised if they fold up. Finally drove past the Suzuki dealer in another town the other day, and realized they were a glorified Buy here/pay here. Complete with chain link fence and a gravel lot. Funny, they were advertising a new 2010 SX4 until a few weeks ago.

  • avatar
    carlisimo

    It’s a pity, because the Kizashi is excellent.

  • avatar
    Hezz

    I find the Kizashi to be a compelling product, would not give a single dollar to the jerk that owns the Suzuki dealership nearby.

  • avatar
    dastanley

    The combination Mazda-Mitsubishi-Suzuki dealer here in town is the sad little forgotten place – like the island of misfit toys (“I’m a choo-choo train with square wheels…”). I never see customers there and the vehicles on the lot never seem to change. They’re in trouble.

  • avatar
    Mullholland

    Get rid of the last remaining marginal dealers. Leave the U.S. for 6 months.
    Restart the brand by selling the cars via the internet and deliver the cars FOB (Fresh Of The Boat) to buyers on the west/east coast, in the following fashion. You board an empty car ferry that takes you out to sea where you board a ship that has with the car you ordered. This car transporter ship is anchored just outside the U.S. international waters. The ferry takes you and your new car back to port and you drive it home. Make the ownership an adventure of convenience.

  • avatar
    GS650G

    i really wanted an SX4 but the highway mileage came up short. If they can improve that figure to mid 30s I would buy one. I know 2 owners that are very happy with them, claim they go like hell in snow, and have had NO problems. But they worry the dealer will go under leaving them without a local warranty shop.

    I hope they can hang on, we need more competition in the low range of cars.

  • avatar
    devilsadvocate

    It looks grim, but if the Kizashi is an indication of what Suzuki is capable of, then they deserve a chance. I’ve never been happier with a car than with my Kizashi (which I’ve had for 2.5 years). If they would bring the Swift to the U.S. and then work some of whatever magic they used to conjure up the Kizashi on the rest of the lineup, there might be a chance for them. In my neck of the woods (central N.C.), SX4′s and GV’s are commonplace, and there are even several Kizashis around. As for questions of reliability, Suzuki-designed and built autos are just as good as anything else out there, IMHO. People need to get over their ignorance and stop lumping the rebadged Daewoos into the reliability equation…they’re not for sale anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      dima

      I think GM kill Suzuki by forcing them to sell rebadged Daewoos. I think this is a root of the reliability problem. People always remember bad things.

      • 0 avatar
        devilsadvocate

        Agreed…a lot (but not all) of Suzuki’s current issues are the misperceptions that the reliability of those rebadged Daewoos accurately reflects the reliability of actual Suzukis. If GM had any sense, they would have kept Suzuki and had them play a part in their small car designs instead of giving that job to Daewoo.

  • avatar
    obruni

    no love for the Suzuki Equator in here?

    • 0 avatar
      jandrews

      Love? No. But I will admit it’s the best Suzuki Nissan makes.

    • 0 avatar
      devilsadvocate

      Since it’s a Nissan Frontier with a much better warranty (and better looking to boot), it makes perfect sense to buy the Equator over the Frontier…however I bet if you asked 1000 people, one might know that it’s actually a Nissan in disguise.

      • 0 avatar
        jandrews

        Nah. If you want a midsized pickup it makes perfect sense to buy a Tacoma or fully depreciated ranger so you know your workhorse will either last forever or be easy to find cheap parts for.

        Jesus God, don’t buy a Suzuki new.

  • avatar
    Spike_in_Brisbane

    The majority of TTACers here seem to want Suzuki to go away just like they wanted Saab to go away and like many seem to want Mitsubishi to go away. It never fails to amaze me that such a large, wealthy nation as the U.S. seems unable to sustain minor players who seem to manage elsewhere.
    We foreigners (Don’t flame me please) keep hearing about the American’s vanilla taste in cars – no station wagons, no hatches, no diesels, no French cars please!! I cannot believe that having moved back to a tiny island in the Pacific (well, not tiny) I have such a wide choice when it comes to selecting a car. I’m loving it and loving my Citroen C5.

    • 0 avatar
      28-cars-later

      Unfortunately Spike you’re right we Americans as a whole have very vanilla taste in automobiles… heck right now most of them look and drive the same depending on segment. Most of TTAC I would think is in the minority of good taste for wagons, hatches, and turbodiesels, they just don’t usually offer them to us in the States.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “It never fails to amaze me that such a large, wealthy nation as the U.S. seems unable to sustain minor players who seem to manage elsewhere.”

      Large and affluent is the essence of the problem.

      The US market is large enough that companies will make competing here a priority. It’s dog eat dog, and the little dogs tend to get chewed up.

      And the market is dispersed enough that the cost of doing business here is high. There’s no way to cover the expansiveness of the US market without making a substantial financial commitment. Not everyone has the money to do that.

    • 0 avatar
      Volts On Fire

      “The majority of TTACers here seem to want Suzuki to go away just like they wanted Saab to go away and like many seem to want Mitsubishi to go away.”

      Not just the B&B. The overwhelming majority of American citizens have already demonstrated they want those companies to Go Away, too.

      If a company insists on offering inferior, anachronistic junk – as Suzuki did for years with its endless series of rebadged Daewoo shitboxes, and Mitsubishi still does with the Galant and Endeavor – then buyers respond by giving their hard-earned money to better competitors. Soon, if the system works as it should, those ailing companies shrivel and die. Simple as that.

      The same logic also explains why a clear majority of Americans wanted to let GM croak back in 2008. If a company can’t make money and/or sustain itself by selling its products in the US, then it absolutely should Go Away from here.

    • 0 avatar
      jandrews

      Unfortunately you’re correct. If you want interesting vehicles here, you have to create them yourself. Want something fun and unique? Prepare to void your warranty!

      One of my vehicles is a heavily modified pickup, which I love to death.

      The other is a 5 door, and I swear to god after owning this thing I will never have another DD that isn’t a hatch/compact 5 door. I just wish I could get one that’s diesel powered and built by someone other than fucking Volkswagen. God I hate VW. The current poster child of the milquetoast problem.

  • avatar
    theonewhogotaway

    “It may have been somewhat rational to buy a Suzuki SX4 or Grand Vitara over a comparable Korean car, but nowadays, one would have to have a powerful reality distortion field to make that choice”

    Just for the sake of the argument, can you please give me a comparable Korean (or whatever else) product to the AWD SX4 at that price point?

    Thank you. And then let’s talk about distorted reality ;)

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      I’m guessing the “cheapest AWD hatch you can buy” market is rather small. That should be enough to hijack some Impreza customers, but nothing else about the SX4 is better than its competitors.

  • avatar
    Adub

    Suzuki should have been selling the Swift here. I lived in Europe recently and they were EVERYWHERE, and for good reason. Alas, I think Suzuki missed the boat. Hyundai is too strong now.

  • avatar
    "scarey"

    Asking the best and the brightest- Why can’t Daimler run a low-medium priced car company when Mercedes cars are not all luxury/high-priced cars in Europe. They make taxis, and delivery trucks, no ?

  • avatar
    lilpoindexter

    Whatever happened to the Chrysler death watch?

  • avatar
    chicagoland

    My mom got a used 1.5 year old Reno with 4000 miles thinking it was a ‘bargain’ for $8000. Elderly lady stopped driving it.

    Now, wishes didn’t get it. It runs fine, no break downs, but it gets V6 gas mileage for a compact car. I regret not saying ‘no’ [I didn\'t think she\'d really buy it], but the dealer is best friends with step-dad, so…at least they also have an Avalon.


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