By on April 24, 2012

When Jaguar Land Rover announced plans to start hiring workers at their Halewood plant, the company received 6,000 applications in less than 24 hours. One month on, and Jaguar has received a further 29,000 applications.

The north of England has traditionally lagged behind the south in terms of economic prosperity, but the loss of good jobs in industries like manufacturing, shipping and mining has further enhanced hardships in the region (and also inspired some of the world’s best musicians, from The Beatles to New Order to Oasis). The JLR factory near Liverpool will expand its workforce to 4,500 employees while producing vehicles like the Range Rover Evoque and Land Rover LR2 around the clock. In 2009, Halewood lost 300 jobs after Jaguar cancelled production of the X-Type, but since then, thousands of jobs have been added at the facility.

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30 Comments on “Jaguar Land Rover Gets 35,000 Applicants For 1,000 Jobs At Halewood Plant...”


  • avatar
    skor

    35K applications for 1K jobs? How can that be? According to Mush Limpblow and Glenn Dreck, people in socialist counties…like the UK…..don’t want to work. They would rather sponge off the dole.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Does making things up about people you disagree with help you ignore your culpability in the disaster at our doorstep?

      • 0 avatar
        zerofoo

        What impending disaster? Poor people? We have had and will always have the poor, and we should do what we can to help them. It’s not liberal or conservative policy to help the poor – it’s a human policy.

        Now if you are talking about unfunded wars with no purpose, unfunded nation-building exercises, unfunded bail-outs for banks and failed private industry, and finally unfunded tax cuts – then I’m with you on that.

        The real impending disaster is that we cannot afford the empire we have built. We’ve maxed out our credit line to maintain the empire. The only way to fix the financial house of cards we’ve built is to eliminate the world-wide empire we’ve built.

        But yeah, that’s really hard, so let’s just dump the blame on poor people – especially those trying to find work.

      • 0 avatar
        replica

        Helping the poor is great, I just don’t want to be forced to do it with threats of imprisonment (tax evasion.)

    • 0 avatar

      Both of my parents lived in the UK at times when the top tax rate was something like 97 percent. It hasn’t been that way since the Thatcher era.

    • 0 avatar
      skor

      @zerofoo,

      Yup. That about sums it up.

      Here’s a documentary you might like.

      http://www.sonyclassics.com/insidejob/

  • avatar
    BrewCity

    Very much like the US “rust belt” cities, things got really rough in the north of England in the 1970s and 1980s for those working in heavy industry and manufacturing. At one point in the north east unemployment was around 20%.

    I attended the University of Sunderland (in the north east). The city of Sunderland used to be a coal mining and shipbuilding capital (bombed heavily by the Luftwaffe in World War II). Then the jobs were gone.

    Since then, they’ve really turned things around. I can’t speak for Liverpool, but there’s been a real renaissance in Newcastle and Sunderland. While Nissan opened a plant there in the mid-80s, service industry jobs are now more the norm.

    • 0 avatar

      Unemployment in the States is 20%.

      • 0 avatar
        replica

        People like to say that but everyone I know has a job. I don’t know any of these unemployed people we all talk about.

      • 0 avatar
        skor

        Unemployment in the US is defined as follows: People who are not gainfully employed who ARE ACTIVELY LOOKING FOR A JOB.

        If you have a part time job that doesn’t offer benefits, but you’d really rather have a full time job, you are not counted as unemployed. If you have returned to school or some training program, even though you would really rather be on the job, you are not counted as unemployed. If you have dropped out of the labor force and given up after sending out 1000 resumes, you not counted as unemployed.

        The official unemployment rate in the US is 8.2 percent, but when you account for discouraged people, and the underemployed, the rate is probably double that.

      • 0 avatar
        28-cars-later

        “The official unemployment rate in the US is 8.2 percent, but when you account for discouraged people, and the underemployed, the rate is probably double that.”

        Yeah statistics are a funny thing aren’t they, you can include or exclude data you don’t like or feel is out of scope.

      • 0 avatar
        replica

        Within your personal sphere of people you know, what is that unemployment rate? If you had to guess what the unemployment rate was without an information source, where would you guess?

      • 0 avatar
        aristurtle

        The BLS calculates all that too. U3 is the “unemployment rate” that you hear about so much. U4 includes “discouraged workers”, U5 includes “marginally attached” and U6 indicates “underemployment”.

        http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t15.htm

        The data is right there to look at, if anyone cares.

      • 0 avatar
        28-cars-later

        I would guess real unemployment is at least 10%, probably somewhere between 10%-15%, counting those who have given up, and those who are still actively looking with a good chunk of those figures bode higher for the sub 30 crowd. If we count underemployed that figure jumps 5%-10%, I think your underemployed are between 30-60. So up to at least 25% has some sort of job issue, which is one out of 4. How do those figures sound to you?

      • 0 avatar
        28-cars-later

        Aris I checked out your link, the feds say the total of everything:

        U-6 Total unemployed, plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force, plus total employed part time for economic reasons, as a percent of the civilian labor force plus all persons marginally attached to the labor force

        14.5% in March 2012.

        With a +/- 3% this is somewhat believable.

      • 0 avatar
        onyxtape

        I live in Seattle, with one of the best economies right now in the country, and I see about 5% unemployment amongst acquaintances (that I know of).

        Considering most of my friends and I are in the top 10% of the country in terms of income, I can certainly imagine things being pretty tough for the average Joe if my personal acquaintances still eeked out a 5% unemployment rate. It certainly doesn’t surprise me that the actual unemployment rate (not even counting under-employed people) is around 20%-25%. I volunteer by mentoring a few soon-to-graduate college students for career development and it’s pretty bleak out there. As bright and accomplished as they are, it’s likely they may need to live with their parents for a while.

  • avatar
    ranwhenparked

    Jaguar Land Rover have really been on fire lately – there was the Bloomberg report that the company may be valued at $14 billion, were it to be separated from Tata – that’s significantly more than Peugeot Citroen!

    All three plants in the UK are basically running at capacity, and although the recent changes at Halewood have improved its flexibility, they have a really agressive new model strategy and could soon run into a problem of not having enough plants to build them all.

    • 0 avatar
      28-cars-later

      Ford should have never sold them. Volvo was a grave misadventure, but JLR is quickly proving its worth. I think they were sold for something like 2 billion… now valued at 14? The rich get richer…

  • avatar

    Tata bought JLR just after Ford had poured billions into the company, updating vehicle architecture (the all aluminum XJ weighs less than the smaller XF), giving the marque new engines and most important of all, paying for the new XF, XJ and Land Rover models that are the source of the current profits.

    Ford may not have made money on JLR, but they managed the acquisition well and JLR left Ford’s possession in much better shape than when FoMoCo bought it.

    • 0 avatar
      Tstag

      Yes but you don’t sell something that is going to shoot up in value. Ford should have sold Volvo (a brand that may go the way of SAAB) and closed Lincoln. The sale of Volvo would have generated the money Ford needed to keep the lights on at JLR during the recession and then allowed Ford to cash in big time or continue building a true premium division.

      Time for Mullaly to admit he lost Ford shareholder billions on this.

      • 0 avatar
        Robert.Walter

        The company was within 6 months of bankruptcy as it was. Dropping the satellites in order to focus on the home planet was absolutely the right decision.

        If Ford hadn’t acted when it did, as it did, and if the economy had broken against Ford at the wrong time, or duration-wise, Ford’s current situation would be like that of GM and Chrysler; it would not have been a good bet to hold onto JLR waiting for better days.

      • 0 avatar
        kkt

        You sell something that’s going to shoot up in value if you are going to be evicted tomorrow and absolutely have to raise some cash. Nobody would have paid any money for Lincoln and not enough for Volvo.

    • 0 avatar
      Robert Gordon

      “the all aluminium XJ”

      The body structure of an XJ is made mainly from 6111,5182, 5754 alloys not aluminium per se. Calling it aluminium is like calling steel, iron.

      • 0 avatar

        By that standard I suppose that I shouldn’t say my bike has a titanium frame because it’s really an alloy of titanium, aluminum and vanadium. Or, for the matter, that my ring that was my father’s isn’t gold per se because it’s only 14K, not 24K. If we wanted to get really pedantic, we could argue over iron as well, since most cast “iron” these days is also an alloy. Taconite anyone?

        For Ford’s centennial they commissioned the building of six new Model Ts. The engine blocks were not exact duplicates because these days you can’t get iron as impure as what was used in 1908.

  • avatar
    silverkris

    Ford wasn’t quite able to master the strategy/positioning of their “Premier Automotive Group” – it took too much attention and resources. I concur with Ronnie that they did some good things for JLR before they sold it.

    • 0 avatar
      skor

      Ford was forced by circumstances to pawn off Jag in a last ditch effort to save the Glass House. Until that time, they were making pretty good progress with the Premier Auto Group.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      My little anecdote with Jaguar during the Ford days.

      Back in the late 90s / early 2000s, I went to a multi-day interview in for one of Ford’s executive development tracks. I was young and interviewing against MBAs and PhDs (when I only had a lowly Bachelor’s, placed into an Apprentice-ish situation with some very motivated and bright people). I must have done something right as I was picked for one of the slots. Apparently, one of the interviewers was the head product management person for Jaguar (he didn’t identify himself as such at the time), and I told him outright that the new Jaguars looked like Tauruses with leather. He later said he wasn’t used to not having a bunch of Ford yes-men around him, and found my blunt honesty refreshing. I ended up declining the offer, which turns out to be a better decision as I probably would have gotten axed soon after during Ford’s upcoming dark times.

  • avatar
    TW4

    This tells us that wages/compensation should be falling so unemployment can stabilize and manufacturing jobs can be preserved. Wages are not adjusting, and unlike Keynes’ theory of sticky wages, workers don’t appear to be demanding artificially high wages.

    This is the strangest economic crisis in the history of the developed world.

  • avatar
    robc123

    Forget about the 1k jobs or the 35k people that applied- the ratio is 35 to 1.
    That would be killer in the US or Canada where employees routinely get 250-350 applications per opening. A 250 to 1 ratio.


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