By on March 7, 2012

Can we just get this in a five-door? Even though Fiesta sales aren’t as great as Ford would hope, I quite like this ST version.

With a 1.6L Ecoboost 4-cylinder making 180 horsepower and 177 lb-ft, the Fiesta ST also has chassis improvements, Torque Vectoring Control, programmable stability control and Recaro bucket seats. I’m not too optimistic about this car’s chances in North America, but wouldn’t it be nice nonetheless…

 

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37 Comments on “Geneva 2012: Ford Fiesta ST...”


  • avatar
    PaulVincent

    I too would prefer a 5 door, but the important thing is to get it in America whether having 3 or 5 doors.

  • avatar
    afflo

    3-door. Better looking, and longer doors, so no B-pillar next to your head, and the armrest/windowsill continue back to your elbow. The back seat in the Fiesta isn’t terribly useful.

    (If you didn’t get your all of your vitamins as a child and slide the seat forward to drive, disregard. ;-) )

    • 0 avatar
      Lumbergh21

      I agree. When they bring cars to this country that are 3-doors overseas and change them into 4-door or 5-doors for the US market, they destroy the visual appeal of the original (assuming that it had some to begin with and this Fiesta does).

      • 0 avatar
        Educator(of teachers)Dan

        Yes 3 door please… I don’t like my hot hatch to look like every other 5 door hatch on the market.

      • 0 avatar
        ciddyguy

        In this case, the current Fiesta comes in both, even in Europe if I’m not mistaken. I know the original MK1 version only came in a 3 door body at the time.

        That’s one thing about Europe, you CAN get a sportier 3 door variant of many models that are not available here. If an ST variant were to come stateside, I’m guessing it’d be as a 5 door, or perhaps as both.

        I actually like this in the 3 door configuration myself I’d be seriously interested in this myself.

      • 0 avatar
        CRConrad

        I don’t think that happens very often. My guess is, they just import only one version of cars that are available both as three- and five- (or two- and four-) door vehicles elsewhere.

      • 0 avatar
        Ubermensch

        The MKVI Golf/GTI is one of the exceptions to this. I think the Golf/GTI look much better with 5 doors. Not to mention that I absolutely HATE having to deal with ingress and egress issues with coupe body styles.

  • avatar
    redav

    I don’t see why Ford should/would offer this and the Focus ST. It makes more sense to have one or the other but not both.

  • avatar
    GS650G

    Those headlights are nearly as long as the hood. Soon we’ll have lighted tires.

  • avatar
    Sinistermisterman

    I quite liked the look of the front end of the new Fiesta. It’s a shame that Ford have grafted on a mini-me version of the Focus ST’s guppy-mouth grill. The car just ends up looking mildly retarded from the front.

  • avatar
    majo8

    This is the exact car I would buy to replace my ’06 Civic coupe, but only in 3-door trim. I’ve driven the 5-door, and the door arm rest ends before it even reaches my elbow ( I’m 6’1″ ), making it a no-go for me. But this? Hell yeah.

    Since we already have the Focus 5-door ST, the 3-door Fiesta ST would be a nice addition to Ford’s lineup, and they need another 2-door option. Ford must be the only major car maker that has only one 2-door car for sale in America.

    • 0 avatar
      afflo

      Majo: I’m a pretty average 6’1 as well… I don’t know if it’s concerns about side impact airbags or what, but rearward seat travel has become pretty awful in newer cars. Glad someone shares my concerns about the armrest… Even worse is reclining the seat further than you need to, just to get a bit of extra space between the seatback and the firewall, and having the shoulder-strap loose on your shoulder because you’re behind it.

      I can’t imagine how it must be for tall people.

      • 0 avatar
        Firestorm 500

        Average is 5’9″. You are considered tall.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        He’s only taller than 90% of the world’s population. So, using the US’s concept of “middle class,” he *is* average.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        6’1″? With your talk about sliding the seat all the way back and short people being vitamin-deprived, I was expecting that you’d actually be tall!

      • 0 avatar
        afflo

        Nope… 6’1 ain’t tall. 5’9 is “average,” but that includes quite a few people coming from other countries where childhood nutrition is not as developed as ours.

        And I have to slide the seat all the way back. Makes some newer cars pretty unenjoyable… Again, makes me wonder how miserable it is for tall drivers… The solution always seems to be “Look, an even TALLER car with more headroom, but that doesn’t get your knees out of your face (I’m lookin’ at you, Honda Fit)

    • 0 avatar
      sixt5cuda

      It is nice to see, that I’m not the only person who realized that Ford only has one 2-door left, in the Mustang. I bought a 2010 Focus Coupe, when it was Ford’s only other 2-door.

      The Focus wasn’t my first choice. I wanted a 2-door with a hatch. Being 6’6″ tall, I don’t get along with sedans and their B-pillars. The Kia Forte Koup and the Honda Civic Coupe were my first choice. Sadly, they both share a flawed seat design. The bottom cushion just seems too short.

      Other 2-door hatches available at the time included a Hyundai Accent or a Toyota Yaris. The Hyundai seemed too small after my old ZX3, and I don’t care for the Yaris’ center-mounted speedometer. VW Golf/Rabbit/GTI weren’t even considered, as being unreliable/expensive. (As well as less economical)

  • avatar
    PaulVincent

    I have the long doors on my ’94 RX7, and that’s fine, but if I had my choice for the Fiesta, I’d prefer the utility of four side doors.

  • avatar
    PJ McCombs

    Digging those specs. I like a car that’s fast enough to be fun, but not so fast that you can’t let ‘er rip on a public road once in a while. Its US chances certainly seem better now that the rest of the range is there…

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    Ford should bring this car out to the US and then start a racing series for performance sub-compacts in close to stock spec.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    I would never purchase any vehicle with a turbo. Too many complaints. Check out this:

    fordecoboostforum.com/index.php?/topic/
    240-f150-ecoboost-problems/

    • 0 avatar
      ciddyguy

      Jimmyy, part of the problem with that thread you linked to is most of the posts were from LAST YEAR. Don’t know if Ford has fixed it yet and it may NOT be turbo related at all. No definitive conclusions on that one. Sorry, you missed the boat.

      That said, it could be a myriad of things happening but it seems Ford is looking into it. and if this is a common issue with turbos, we’d see similar issues with other makes, not just Ford.

      It’s well known you have a distaste for Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      28-cars-later

      Personally I would never buy a turbo vehicle used, but new or w/extended warranty I’d give it a shot. I think long term the only way automakers will be able to meet ridiculous CAFE standards in gas autos will be tricks such as CVT and turbos in tiny engines. Look at GM they are already starting to do this with new Buicks (turbo dohc 4s) and the Cruze. Next gen Malibu will probably fall victim to this type of thinking, and the base model will be an underpowered turbo and they’ll make you pay for the current 170bhp Ecotec in a higher trim package. I already have little long term confidence in either CVT and turbo automotive technology. Buying used say ten years from now may be perilous, with used hybrids on rebuilt batteries floating around, cars with broken turbos, and CVT models on their third transmission.

  • avatar
    Yuuki

    I sure hope that Ford will bring this to Indonesia

  • avatar
    niky

    This engine is epic as far as turbocharged engines go, and I like it a fair bit better than the one in the MINI.

    Should suit the Fiesta nicely. It’s one of those “sorted” cars that could handle a lot more power (at least in Euro-spec, with the stiffer suspension)… though braking should be improved greatly to handle the extra shove.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    Ford botched the PowerShift at launch and buried the issue as it continued to sell cars to the point that you can’t even FIND references to the problem on the interwebs without digging through shills telling me how great the Fiesta is and how the SYNC changes driving forever.

    Ford dealer service techs have no idea how to work on this new generation of small European city cars (despite being extensively trained by being forced to watch a 2 hour training video), I can’t even imaging what kind of sandbagging you’ll get for bringing in a small gasoline turbo to a dealer who has one or two techs that even understand the technology–and that’s really for trucks.

    Bundle it in with the legendary Mexican build quality the US market Fiestas already enjoy and you have a recipe for Ford burying even more customer complaints in the mass grave of Mustang transmissions, driveshafts, Fiesta Powershifts, Raptor Frames, etc…

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      It seems that recently Ford has only responded to problems when they affect media coverage. Transmission problems in the Mustang?Nothing. MFT and DCT problems? Tell people that’s how they are supposed to work. CR & JDP slam them? They dump all their resources to ‘upgrade’ the software. While they spin it as being responsive to customer problems, the fact is they knew about the MFT problems for well over a year–and even continued to add the flawed systems to other cars–before attempting a fix.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      That first bit you said makes me wonder if thats why Ford supports SOPA.

    • 0 avatar
      srogers

      That’s so amazing that Ford controls the Internet now. I wonder if they’re listening to us through our fillings?

      • 0 avatar
        FJ60LandCruiser

        Every Ford recall issue has been met with a massive flood of denial from their PR department. If you have a Mustang transmission failure, the NHTSA has found them innocent of all wrongdoing and it’s all in your head.

        If you have had a PowerShift failure, it’s because you’re an idiot and the car is SUPPOSED to jerk violently while shifting gears and leak transmission fluid and Ford is happy to re-educate the car (and you) if you disagree. Thankfully the BBB didn’t agree with this and Lemon Lawed our crappy Fiesta.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      The EcoBoost V6 has been available since 2009, and PowerStrokes with turbos far before that, not to mention most dealers will service vehicles of any make, so there’s really nothing exotic about these engines that the average dealer service department can’t handle.

      The Fusion/MKZ are built in Mexico and routinely rate top in the class with regards to reliability.

      There haven’t been massive MT82 failures – just a small number of very vocal owners with issues. Is there a problem there, probably, and it’s being addressed, with many of the owners already getting satisfaction. I’m not aware of any driveshaft issue beyond the one case where the guy removed the speed limiter and thus reaped his own results from running the car beyond spec. It’s the same isssue with the Raptor frames – no car or truck is going to be able to take unlimited amounts of abuse. The stock frame was able to take the Baja 1000 and not bend, so there is obviously a pretty high bar that has to be crossed before damage takes place.

      When it comes to Fiesta powershifts you can either choose to believe there is massive conspiracy whereby Ford is trying to whitewash the issue, or you can believe that it was a first year model that had some bugs that have since been fixed. TrueDelta’s initial reliability ratings on the Fiesta were not good mainly because of the ground wire issue, but have since improved greatly to the point where the Fiesta now sits in the average reliability range trending towards better than average. What’s more likely, that Ford hired a bunch of people to cover up the problem, or that they saw there was an issue and addressed it and that the happy owners are now happy because the problems are gone?

      It’s the same thing with MFT – yes it was buggy at launch, there have been multiple incremental upgrades along the way, and when it was determined that the incremental upgrades weren’t enough for everyone the software package was entirely rewritten. Most of the MFT systems worked fine, albeit with slow page transitions and some oddly laid out screens. The new update not only fixes the stability issues but the speed and layout issues as well. There has still been a lot of demand for the system even with the not-quite polished code. It’s a reason to buy the car for more people than a reason not to.

      • 0 avatar
        niky

        MFT is really a pain in the arse, but it doesn’t brick your car. The touchscreen simply shuts down completely and reboots itself.

        Owning an iPad and a number of touchscreen phones, it’s not qualitatively different from any of them. Touchscreens lag when they’re loaded… and for some reason, Ford’s interface has more load on it than you’d expect from something not running continuous internet connection and anti-virus in the background. It’s probably a stupid memory leak.

        As for issues with the Raptor. I’ve always thought that was as overblown as Nissan’s “fragile” GT-R gearbox. A small group of owners hooning the hell out of the car then going “wah wah” when it broke. (the most vociferous one having done “only” 20 “hard launches”… on the street and within one month of purchase…) Most of us have enough sense not to abuse an AWD drivetrain like that… And yet other owners have been to the dragstrip hundreds of times without issue, simply by following the instruction manual.

        The Dual-Clutch problem is real. Real enough that Ford are now offering clutch pack replacements. Mighty nice of them. When you burn out a clutch pack on a Honda CVT, you have to replace the whole damn transmission.

  • avatar

    The normal Fiesta doesn’t excite me, but the tweaks on this hot hatch version are really working for me. If it does make it across the Atlantic, I think this could become a modern day CRX for me.

  • avatar
    Les

    I like the cut of this car’s jib, it’s two-door styling reminds me of the Ford Focus RS that Clakrson ran around the TG test track back on ’09.

    I was very much getting interested in dumping my 12-year-old 4-door S-10 Blazer by then, wanting something a bit shorter.. like the Focus RS.. with two doors.. like the Focus RS… with a bit better mileage… like the Focus RS… and a bit ‘peppier’… like the Focus RS.. and I just flat liked the styling of the Focus RS, and the version on that episode was left-hand drive so how was I to know what awaited me when I went down to the nearest dealership and said, “Show me your Focuses.”

    What they showed me was this sad.. sad.. SAD little sedan, so sad I could feel everything that was hopeful and happy and alive within me being drawn out and absorbed into this black pit of automotive despair.


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