By on February 29, 2012

Yesterday, we saw a majestic Cartier chronometer out of a ’76 Lincoln Continental Mark IV, which was a pretty easy call for many of you. Today’s NTCC contestant should be a little more difficult, though it should be an obvious call to certain single-marque-obsessed types. Make your guess, then make the jump to see what it is. Year/make/model?

1984 Volkswagen Golf Wolfsburg Edition

The VDO name indicates that it’s probably from something European, and the built-in gas and temp gauges smack of VW-ness. It’s a bit subdued for the mid-1980s, but VW never went for Mitsubishi-grade wild gauges. Did you get it right? If not, what did you think it was?

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8 Comments on “Name That Car Clock: VDO Analog With Fuel and Temperature Gauges...”


  • avatar
    TCragg

    My wife and I owned a silver 1984 Rabbit GL years ago. This clock brings back memories. I would have preferred a tach, but in VW’s wisdom, they decided that the 1.7L/3-speed auto combo wasn’t worthy of such frippery.

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    I thought Rabbit also. My uncle had a 79(?). One thing about this series, it shows how big clocks were. I am surprised the Germans didn’t throw a tach there (as it would look cool with the accompanying gauges) but perhaps this was the US spec version.

  • avatar

    I see these at car shows from time to time. I was always amazed that they worked as well as they did.

  • avatar
    LectroByte

    Looks like a nice clock. That fuel guage does seem backwards to me though, shouldn’t empty be on the left?

  • avatar
    pdog

    But does it still work?

    Just yesterday I ended up with the predecessor to this clock/temp/fuel gauge, when I scored a minty early Rabbit fake wood dash for my project. Not sure what I’ll do with the clock, as I’m going to be putting the tach from my existing cracked dash in instead.

    I always liked the VDO gauges of the 80s – so pared down and easy to read. I agree that the inverted fuel gauge seems strange though.

  • avatar
    ciddyguy

    Saw the Cartier clock post but somehow missed this one and I’m not the only one who did.

    I have known that VDO gauges were used in VW’s for years, going back to at least the 60′s.

    Back when the Beetle (old one that is) were still manufactured, the speedo had the idiot lights and the one, lone turn signal indicator within it’s confines but later in the late 60′s IIRC, they incorporated the gas gauge in at the bottom with the 3 idiot lights right above it.

    My best friend once had a base ’77 Rabbit that had no clock or tach, just the large, single speedo and i think it had the gas gauge incorporated within, all other idiot lights were large rectangular things along one side, including the SINGLE turn signal indicator.

    That was a neat little 3 door bright yellow rabbit and the only options was the Golde hand cranked sunroof (broken, a stripped gear) and perhaps the AM radio was the only other option and it even had the basic argent wheels with the black rubber center caps.

    Sadly, he had issues with it and sold it off (this WAS bought used in the mid to late 80′s but it looked really nice otherwise) and that owner took it to LA and it got totaled I think on the way or while down there.

  • avatar
    joeaverage

    The square headlights indicate this is a Westmoreland, PA Rabbit and those cars were “adjusted” for American consumption. In other other words they were slightly more bland vehicles compared to their European cousins. I had an ’84 Rabitt ‘vert and it came with tach, speedo, digital clock, oil temp and oil pressure, water temp, and volts. Much more stylish. ;)

    Sold that car with 190K miles on it and the car had alot of miles left in it. Regularly drove it on the autostrada at 100+ mph for hours. It was an American spec, Germany produced car that I owned in Italy.


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