By on February 2, 2012

A 19 year old student in Halifax, Nova Scotia put up a classified ad looking for a vintage car. The make, model, year and body style are all irrelevant. What Spencer, the ad’s creator, is looking for is “…a classic car with a past that I can keep alive, and continue to keep alive through future generations, continuously adding to the history of a special car.” And he doesn’t want to pay a cent for it.

For those of you who live and die by Farago’s fatwa of 800 words or less, be warned – the ad is a bit lengthy. Spencer wants a cool vintage car, something to set him apart from the masses. It must be able to go on ultra long jaunts through the Nova Scotian countryside while delivering the utmost pleasure behind the wheel and also be a reliable grocery-getter. As far as I know, no vintage car can do all of the above in a trouble-free, cost-effective manner.

Nicholas Maronese of Sympatico Autos spoke to Spencer in an interview, and the comments were split between criticizing the “entitled” attitudes of today’s youngsters, and sympathy for a young man with a dream. Personally, I think Spencer is way in over his head, and his repeated viewings of The Graduate have put ideas in his head that have zero grounding in reality. Owning a modern, reliable car is expensive. Owning a vintage car, with carburetors, flimsy build quality, scarce spare parts and peculiar driving characteristics is expensive and trying – especially for someone on a student budget.

The idea of carrying on someone else’s automotive legacy strikes me as a flight of fancy, the kind that dissolve rapidly when your car won’t start at 3 A.M. in a desolate parking lot in a shitty neighborhood. Everyone’s first car, no matter what it is, will be part of a series of unpredictable and unknowable series of triumphs, failures, financial ruin, bliss and heartbreak. But they are yours, and yours alone.

Fortunately for Spencer, there is a car that can do everything he wants, whether its buying cereal or blasting around with the top down – it’s called a Miata. It’s great on gas, drives like a dream, and starts every single time you turn the key. Hopefully you have your own Elaine to keep you company.

 

 

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91 Comments on “Generation Why: Canadian Teenager Wants Free Vintage Car From Loving Owner...”


  • avatar
    replica

    Someone with limited life experience asking for something free? Impossible.

    • 0 avatar
      wallstreet

      He is burnout from occupying Wall Street.

    • 0 avatar

      Its funny,I actually was looking for van bodyparts and stumbled on this article, I was this niave kid, and my grandfather passed on his 72 for pickup. wich was a legacy, and yes expensive to upkeep. But it taught me about vehicles and the mechanics under the appreciation and the over all value.
      I eventually let that truck go at 22 and I had more important priorities. But that truck haunted my dreams at night. Riding in it in autum with the hum of the heater, windows cracks with a cool autumn breeze rolling in. Or driving it on the first day of spring after a long winter (always kept it garaged in winter and drove a rat). It was the self satisfaction in life.

      At 34 when my best friend from high school, the guy that spent years of his life tinkering under that hood with me. The guy that when an idiot mechanic dropped the truck off ramps while under it, helped lift it with his bare hands off the ground to save that mechanics life. When he died of a brain anurism, all I could think was that element of bonding was gone from my life.
      I started looking for a cheap project again, a premidlife crisis project to enjoy in my free time.

      I looked at vans and this one van caught my eye on craigslist. I thought it was a scam because the picture was tiny and the ad was very wordy. 3 weeks later I saw the same ad again. The curiosity got the best of me and I called. First car ad I ever answered on craigslist. A 1974 chevy campervan/showvan a vehicle made by the best friend of Clyde Orange of the commodores. It was on crenshaw blvd in south los angeles so I took a gamble and a friend and headed down to check it out.
      The guy swore it ran but the motor would bang around because it needed a water pump.THe center console was disconnected and wires were everwhere, it sat in the back. He says free to someone that wants to carry on the legacy.

      I say ok but only if I can drive it out of this driveway (skeptical).

      He says come back on Sunday, he would get the battery charged and ready. Next day I return, he hooks up the battery and after a few tries it fires up and we pull it out. (slight water pump knock), and towed it home.

      The next day my roommate swapped the water pump in 2 hours for $60 us. It was running, returned to the original owner and he provided me with stacks of magazines it was featured i over the years.

      Currently I have more money invested n led lighting than actual repairs. Needed new tires and I rewired the dash in a weekend. Carburetor needs a rebuild and a fresh transmission seal. It sat parked in storage in an aircraft hanger from 1996 till 2009 when I got it.

      I am currently a member of Wheels of Confusion Los Angeles and a result and we have recently discussed salvaging many of the mechanically solid older vans in los angeles and sending them to people to appreciate at reasonable costs.

      While this student may of may not get that vehicle, I had mine in college, the 72 ford. It did what i needed which was got me around campus and to and from my parents, it taught me things important to life and gave me wisdom many people do not have when they are stranded on the side of the road. And you never know what lurks around the corner in a world of altruism, Ive acquired a free 70’s show van and a free 99 volvo s80 from someone that didn’t need it.

      Sometimes you actually just need to look to see the deal.
      my vans website: facebook.com/naturalhighvan

  • avatar
    Da Coyote

    Perhaps someone out there has a Yugo they could donate.

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    How bout an early 80s Diplomat with a slant 6? Sounds perfect for the kid.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      Beat me to it Dan.

      Classic car cues, indestructible powerplants, and rust-resistant* bodies with plenty of chrome to shine and idle screws to endlessly futz with.

      Odds are highest that the kid would get it for, well, next to nothing anyway…

      *See my comment below.

      • 0 avatar
        FuzzyPlushroom

        I was going to post, inquiring as to whether an ’89 Volvo 244 would count – all right, it needs a bit to get back on the road, but it’s not as though it has three-foot-tall weeds ’round it. It was a great first car, and it’ll be a great second car again soon.

        If he has a very, very flexible definition of ‘classic’, I bet he can make his dream happen… but only if.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        At Fuzzy: Gimme the details and location and maybe I’ll grab that Volvo.

  • avatar

    i read this story last week through a Peter Cheney post. Initially I was onside with the kid, but his notion to drive the hell out of the free car was a red flag from a collector car guy point of view. He demonstrated zero respect for the old car culture with that attitude and his business major in university suggested that he was either working on a class assignment or seeking out new ways for beer money at college. His heartfelt respect for the history of the freebie wheels seemed like heartfelt BS upon further review.

    • 0 avatar

      I think he’s serious, but I also think he’s just a young guy with too much imagination and no experience owning a car. Any beer money he has will be eviscerated by the running costs. If he thinks a vintage car is an express pass to being a cool dude, then he has bigger things to deal with…

      • 0 avatar
        Rollo Grande

        Oddly enough I owned a car that met most of these criteria: a beater 1973 Delta 88 Royale convertible. It was a classic, got a ton of attention, hauled ass, it sounded great when you put your foot in it, had a ton of character (rust holes) and stories (dents and bumper stickers). I drove it daily, including all the way across the country in long stretches, with the top down. I had minimal automotive skills and the car gave me minimal problems. But it wasn’t free, I had to pay cash American for it.

        On one hand, I feel for this kid, because he’s a dreamer putting his heart on the line and I really identify with that. I wish I had been so bold when I was his age. And I hope he gets what’s he’s looking for.

        On the other hand, the subtext of the letter tells me he really doesn’t know what he’s talking about, and kind of reminds me of my last intern. Bright ,well-educated kid who loved talking about work, but didn’t want to actually do any.

        I certainly wouldn’t give Spencer my baby and expect he’d keep his lofty promises. But if I had a beater to unload, sure. Have at it kid. Find out what you’re made of.

  • avatar
    jz78817

    And hillbillies want to be called “sons of the soil,” but it ain’t gonna happen.

  • avatar
    wstarvingteacher

    I am not an ungrounded teen and I have a lot of difficulty keeping my 57 chev running. Mostly lack of money/time, both items most teens are short on.

  • avatar
    JoelW

    “Meet you halfway, kid. You shovel the snow and mow the lawn for two years, and this beauty is YOURS.”

    Also, wasn’t there something similar to this a year or two ago involving a Bugatti Veyron? Hm…

  • avatar
    replica

    Classic car with a past. That’s pretty vague. 1986 Ford Taurus? 1980 Citation? 1983 Camaro? Yeah. He’s on to something.

  • avatar
    MrWhopee

    I read, either here or in Curbside Classic, about a Dodge Shadow America that someone keep in pristine condition. Sounds perfect for the kid.

  • avatar
    acuraandy

    Having read the ad, I (almost) know where this guy is coming from. However, in a world of $3000(US) fifteen year old Camcords, this seems to be a tall order.

    Initially, I was going to call him a self-entitled brat. But that last sentence in the ad really struck a cord with me.

    I’d recommend a Panther. Canadian, big V8, BOF, and now with their demise, of historical significance. And relatively reliable to boot! Might even get lucky and find one from a recently departed elder…?

    I bet one can be had in Canada for less $ than in the US, but might be wrong. Oh right, he wants it free.

    Hope you find what you’re looking for, sir.

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    Gotta admit, the kid has chutzpah! Keep those big balls covered, keed. My grandpappy told me it gets COLD up there in the maritimes, eh?

  • avatar
    glwillia

    I’d give him my ’79 Mercedes 240D. 350k miles, rusted-out floor, horrible blowby, 5 inches of steering play and a botched veggie conversion, but it IS reliable. It has the 4-speed manual transmission too, so he might even see 0-60 times of under 30 seconds.

    *EDIT* I’d give it to him if scrap prices weren’t so high, that is. Not that much metal is left in that car.

  • avatar
    dejal1

    Don’t believe I’ve ever met a Nova Scotian before. If he is representative of one, I don’t ever want to.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      Maritimers are salt of the earth. I loved every moment of my trip out there in ’07.

      Plus, this kid is one of 920-odd thousand people in the province.

      Maybe he pines for a classic car because most of them out there have disintegrated from the briny sea air. I was surprised to see 4 or 5 year old vehicles on my trip with perforated rust damage.

    • 0 avatar
      acuraandy

      @dejal: Ever seen Trailer Park Boys? There ya go…

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    ’68 Dodge Dart with a slant six.

    Shoot, wasn’t their a junkyard find of an ’89 Corolla AllTrac written up today? Could rescue that for free.

    Hmmmmmmmmmmmm…I guess I should put up an ad on Craig’s List. Middle-aged single dad seeks free McMansion to carry on the family legacy of another who is no longer interested in doing same. Simply sign deed over to me and I promise to to do the rest.

    Love and kisses.

  • avatar
    rwb

    So this kid does not have enough money to afford any car at all, and wants a storied classic that is also reliable daily transportation and requires minimal upkeep?

    I don’t think he understands how this works.

    Best part of the linked interview:

    “In the ad I specifically said if you are going to criticize me for writing this ad, don’t even bother reading it,” he says of some of the responses he’s got. “Needless to say, some people just don’t understand plain English and feel they need to rip my dreams apart.”

    Welcome to life. Your dreams were untenable, and considering that, were unlikely to stay in one piece for long. Big difference between ambition and ignorance of very real obstacles.

    Edit: Re-reading his ad, it’s not clear if he actually cannot afford a car- if he has the money but just needs something more sentimental than what money can buy, then f*ck this kid.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      “I could go out and buy a $5,000 used 1969 MGB, but it wouldn’t be the same; it needs to mean something more.”

      If he’s got that kind of money he could easily buy a decent classic, insure it, plate it, and fix most nooks and nannies in it with help from the local mechanic.

      I’d reccomend a Datsun Z car for $1500, around that budget you’ll geta decent example with plenty of money to budget.

  • avatar
    RayH

    I say Chrysler Lebaron Convertible, 1980’s or 1990’s version without the Mitsu V6. I’ve seen them at car shows…

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Got just the car for this guy: VW Beetle, vintage, 1972, or even the “Super Beetle” of the same vintage. The VWs are entertaining to drive at the low speeds which Nova Scotia roads will permit and perfectly capable of maintaining 60 mph on varied terrain, moderately loaded. Their rear engine architecture makes them quite good in snow, and, so long as you get a pre-smogged version and keep the engine in tune (which can be done with a feeler gauge and a flashlight bulb with two wires soldered to it), the car will start quite reliably. The VW electric choke works every time. It will put out heat far more quickly than a water-cooled engine. The Super Beetle featured McPherson strut front suspension, marginally better. And the vintage that I recommend had dual-port cylinder heads which yielded a bit more power and, more importantly, a double-jointed independent rear suspension much better than the earlier version’s swing axle which was responsible for the car’s vicious handling characteristics experienced by those who lifted in a corner.

    Expect fuel mileage of about 30 mpg on the highway and low 20s around town.

    The car’s long production run outside of North America and Europe should mean that parts availability — including body panels — should not be too bad.

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      12 years ago I could have found him one for almost free. A old professor of mine who was a collector of everything got caught with his “hand in the cookie jar” by his wife. Quick divorce and she listed his pristine late 70s SuperBettle for $2500 OBO.

  • avatar
    wallstreet

    I’ll donate an Audi 5000.

  • avatar
    harshciygar

    No wonder classic car culture is dying.

    He’s a 19 year old kid with a dream. So many of you are ready to dismiss him outright, crush his dreams, welcome to reality kid.

    Real great attitude. I happen to think someone with the balls to put an ad like this out for public consumption might have the guts to stick it out.

    He wants to keep alive a piece of history. He didn’t ask for a half-million dollar Shelby. He just wants a car with a story. He wants to be knee deep in this car, fix it, love it, know it.

    What the hell is wrong with that? I didn’t know what I was getting into at age 16 when I bought a ’69 Mercury Cougar but almost 10 years later I still have it, and it’s a project that goes together one piece at a time as I find the money.

    I don’t blame our generation for not caring about cars when people have this kind of attitude about them. Sure, wanting something for free is a little childish, but I also know back when a lot of these cars were new they could be had for a song and a dance.

    My dad once abandoned a Chevelle station wagon after the transmission blew and the tow company wanted $25 for a day of storage. He told them to keep it, and went out and bought an MGB for a couple hundred bucks the next day. Such cars would cost thousands of dollars even in crappy shape, and people still believe their crappy Camaro is worth top dollar.

    All you Negative Nancy’s are just haters. I hope this kid gets what he is looking for, and I hope he has the chutzpah to stick it out. It ain’t easy, but it is rewarding.

    • 0 avatar
      replica

      A few things to consider:

      If this “classic car” is already loved and maintained by a collector, why would we assume it’s going to have a better life in the hands of a broke kid? It can a) sit in a garage, be maintained, and taken on long trips to car shows or b) be beaten to death in college parking lots, have the maintenance slack, and get sold off when it becomes too much for him.

      The second thing, EVERY car has a history. Every car is historically significant to someone. Buying any slightly older used car is packed full of stories and charm. The 1990 CRX I bought back in 2006 was one such car. I bought it from the original owner and she had vivid memories of driving it in highschool. It was a part of her life for over 15 years. Who knows the amount highways, people, places, personal failures, victories and life experiences that car silently spectated?

      Another big part of owning an older car is actually buying it. I have rich memories of every car I’ve bought. Imagine the story he could have of saving up, $600, to buy a little Civic sedan…

      • 0 avatar
        potatobreath

        Yes, every car has a history. I once met an Burgundy on Burgundy Aries named Smelly Belly with a blown head gasket. I’ve found it hard to part with any of my previous cars.

        I agree he needs to go buy an older car, grab the service manual and start turning some wrenches. A Miata sounds like a fine choice. ELAINE! ELAINE!

        There are body kits that will make it look like a Ginetta G4 too if he wants retro.
        http://www.thebluepotato.net/conceptframes.htm

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Uhh, we’re being “negative nancys” because the kid wants a clean great car for nothing, a lot of us wouldn’t mind great cars with many stories to tell.

      Not to mention he stated that he “could just go buy an MGB for $5,000″, so clearly he has the cash for a used car.

      If this kid wants a free car he probably will get it, I just don’t know if he’ll like it.

      • 0 avatar
        replica

        Given that he’s never had a car of his own, he may find driving an older car miserable. Ah hell, I’m sure his “dreams” will meet reality. They always do!

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        “Given that he’s never had a car of his own, he may find driving an older car miserable.”

        Only a few individuals out there enjoy ratty interiors and hearing their cars engines all the time, generally they’re the types that’ve opened hoods and worked on their cars.

        That kid has no experience with such.

    • 0 avatar
      MR2turbo4evr

      @ harshciygar: I understand what this guy wants, and I don’t blame him for it, but I bothers me that he expects someone to just hand him a car for free. If you’re a broke student and it takes you 6 months to save up $1000, and that’s all you have to your name, then that’s what you should be offering people in exchange for that “special car”. Or do chores for the previous owner (mowing grass, etc.) as another poster had suggested. I would like to see some committment from him. I really doubt he would value someone else’s car after it’s just been handed to him for free.

  • avatar
    Garak

    He can have my 2000 Lada 110 for free. It’s like a family member all right, as in “not on speaking terms.” They don’t build cars like that anymore, and thank god for that.

  • avatar
    Sinistermisterman

    “…it’s not to be read by people who are critical and closed minded…”
    I’m not what you call closed minded (don’t ask why), and I love people who want to live their dreams, but having read all the way through, this guy just reminds me of yet another kid who’s parents have provided EVERYTHING for him his whole life. I’d bet good money the little scrote hasn’t worked (and by worked I mean wielded a shovel, worked in a supermarket, or other generic crap job you do as a teenager) a day in his entire life. If he’s interested in ‘finance’ and has the money to keep a car on the road, he’ll be able to find the money to buy one (just ask Daddy).
    I’m sorry but the floral prose cannot disguise the fact that he’s just another little sh*t who wants something for nothing.
    Bitter? Yes I am. I grew up scraping cash together for all my cars whilst several wealthier friends had their parents pay for everything.

  • avatar
    pgcooldad

    Not even my own sons go a free car. Matter of fact neither did my brother and I…nor my friends. I see the marijuana underground railroad made its way all the way to Halifax, Nova Scotia, and I know who’s been smoking it.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    My first car was a classic, and my Dad paid for it. With future cars I’d be on my own though.

    It was a 1975 VW Bug, fun but not practical, and I was only able to keep it going thanks to my Father who did most of the work to it.

    I ended up with another classic VW at some point, this time a Type 3 with almost every mechanical issue you could think of.

    These VWs taught me to appreciate power steering, decent weight distribution, macpherson struts, power-to-weight ratio, ease of servicability, water-cooled engines, parts availablity and pricing (VW buffs can be greedy).

    I understand wanting a car with a story, and that’ll last a long time, the problem is either you get a common Japanese car or you get something unique but unreliable and nearly impossible to get parts for.

    If this kid can drop $5k for an MGB he should do it, all classics have a story to tell. However, sometimes we’re better off not knowing those stories.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      A Beetle isn’t practical? I drove one daily for years. A ’72 Super, a ’65 Beetle (still have it) and a ’78 VW Westfalia van. They are very practical. Plenty practical. Trouble and maintenance free? No. You have to do maintenance on them. And no well aged car is practical if you have to rely on a mechanic. Hell I drive modern cars and can’t afford that.

      I think that might be a fact that eludes this kid. How classic is the car that he is dreaming of? 1995? 1965? 1975? That is important b/c somewhere along the way you slip into adjusting valves, carbs and brakes. Go back far enough and you’ll have 6V electrics. I wonder if this kid knows anything about those kinds of maintenance needs?

      He needs to buy a mid-90s car and GIVE it a history of his own. I’ve had several very cheap cars that I had a great time with. Their only “custom” touch was that they were well detailed $500 cars that outshone their peers simply b/c they had been given a little love at the car wash and waxed. I popped the hood on my ’72 Beetle in about ’93 and my coworker was shocked enough at the engine’s appearance to comment on how clean it was. It was 100% stock. No new paint and no grease or oil leaks. Missing pieces I found in junkyards for a little bit of nothing and when I found a carb or air cleaner for $10 that was in better condition than the one on my car (and correct for that year) I bought it and installed it.

      I have the ’65 Beetle in my barn awaiting restoration b/c I have so much history of my own with that car and have no been able to restore it due to being married with kids and a mortgage. The Westfalia is on jackstands in the garage right now about 40% of the way through a front-end rebuild. At 200K miles the balljoints and tierods are tight but the rubber dust boots are crumbling. $25 fix and a bunch of hours to tear it down/install everything with maybe a little paint here and there. Doesn’t have to be perfect underneath, this isn’t a show vehicle. The exterior gets new paint in the spring.

  • avatar
    replica

    79-84 RX7’s and Datsun 280z’s are reasonably affordable. But then, they aren’t free and they do require maintenance, so cross them off the list.

    As for history, I’m sure either the RX7 or Z has probably played every Journey tape of its vintage.

    Why does he have to get the car for free? How does the car’s history become tarnished if he paid for the car? I don’t quite see the reason it needs to be free.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Those are good questions. The only thing that can really tarnish a cars history is either a full-out customisation or complete restoration, even then that only negatively effects its history visually.

      A Z-Car would be a good pick, but I’ve heard that Rotarys can be a bit iffy.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “I don’t quite see the reason it needs to be free.”

      And that is a key ingredient that is missing from his pitch. He should have taken a marketing class prior to posting this ad.

  • avatar
    hgrunt

    I think maybe he’s a fan of the movie Gran Torino and hopes a gentleman with a “vintage” car will want someone to carry the torch for him. I have to admit, when I was that age (a short 8 years ago or so) I would have loved the same to happen to me. At least until I found out I had very little of the mechanical skill and financial fortitude to do this sort of thing. Maybe he’ll do better than I did.

    So far, it seems like an old Benz would be a great candidate for a car. They drive a lot like modern cars, despite their age, and are generally reliable and somewhat easy to work on, depending on which chassis and engine you have.

  • avatar
    Robert Gordon

    Derek, the headline and the body of the text is inaccurate. Nowhere in the guy’s advert does he mention wanting a ‘vintage’ car. He does mention a ‘Classic’ car but not ‘Vintage’

    This is an important distinction because these terms are not synonyms. ‘Vintage’ is a very specific term and it applies to vehicles built between January 1st 1919 and decmber 31st 1930 whereas ‘Classic’ is a more general term although some define it as being a vehicle between 20 and 45 years old. A Mazda MX-5 (Miata) would indeed fit the bill here – however don’t be under any illusion that an MX-5 is neccessarily going to be better than any other clapped out 20 year old car. I’ve seen some MX-5s that are absolute wrecks.

    • 0 avatar

      Robert,

      For the under 30 crowd, the term vintage means “anything older than I am that can be used as a talisman of social status”. So for the purposes of this article, it’s appropriate.

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Gordon

        I don’t agree. Vintage has a clear definition so the point is moot anyway, as an automotive authority you should be using the correct terms when editorialising not one you think might ‘appeal to the kidz’. In any case the 19 year old posting the advert doesn’t use the term, so I think the assertion that the under 30’s demographic widely use it as a catch all term for old cars is not really supported by the evidence. This young Canadian, for all his naivety actually uses the appropriate descriptor ‘classic’ – whilst you do not.

  • avatar
    FromaBuick6

    This is the sort of thing that has made me increasingly intolerant of other people. Everybody wants something for nothing and they’re completely oblivious as to why anyone else would find that objectionable. Apparently money grows on trees and being a smelly, filthy OWS protester is a marketable job skill.

    What a lazy, greedy and stunningly stupid society we’ve become. I’m only 25 and I fear for the future.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Thats how I feel whenever I talk to someone thats trying to sell… well anything.

      Try to sell something and nobody will pay what you ask, hagglings everywhere. I don’t really blame greed as much as modern “Wheel n Deal TV shows” where they eat up time with haggling, and if its on TV surely it’ll work in the real world.

      • 0 avatar
        Brock

        There is nothing modern about haggling. It is as acient a phenom as markets themselves. If anything we have moved away from the idea.

        To me, the difference is when you haggle you understand your want for a better price as well as the sellers, even if your idea of better is different. Just thinking you should get something for free, is a different idea.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        At Brock: The old man in me must be messing with my head again.

        It being an old art though, I wonder why so many people I talk to are short on patience with hagglers.

        I’d love to see someones reaction if I look at their cars for sale, and then said “Its neat, I have $5000, but could you give me the car for free?”.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        Ryoku75 and Buick – yep.

  • avatar
    Ar-Pharazon

    What, he can’t find a paper clip?

  • avatar
    Redshift

    I’m actually located in Halifax, Nova Scotia. I hadn’t seen this until now. Nothing in the local automotive community about it.

    Trying to figure out how much I support his cause vs. just thinking he’s out of touch with reality and feels entitled to free stuff.

    A friend of mine has an 84 RX7 GSL-SE that needs a rebuild (oil cooler failed while he was on the highway and dumped it’s contents by the time he made it to the side of the road) and his landlord made him get rid of it. I know where it is.
    I also have a 2nd Gen RX7 roller in my side yard.
    Could probably find a bunch more free/nearly free interesting cars with a bit of thought.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      I wonder how much he’d put up with turning a wrench. I’ve met and tried to teach alot of guys who told me they wanted to learn and are enthusiastic shade-tree mechanics until they get greasy and have to lay on the ground. The following weekend they are busy and soon after the project is forgotten and sold.

  • avatar
    Zombo

    Kick the brat in the balls to get him motivated ! I busted my ass for two summers on a farm to earn the money for my first car now the spoiled sh*ts of today just want something given to them for free . Go figure !

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “I busted my ass for two summers on a farm to earn the money for my first car now the spoiled sh*ts of today just want something given to them for free.”

      Let me guess – it was a Gran Torino.

      I know, I know…I’m getting off of your lawn.

  • avatar
    fincar1

    Not only does this kid want a car for free, he apparently doesn’t even want to be bothered to get up off his lazy ass and go find one – which, as @Redshift above mentions, could be done with minimal effort.

    • 0 avatar
      Redshift

      could be done with minimal effort.

      See, I think you just nailed what’s bugging me. It appears (and I admit, I’m judging based on minimal information) but not only does he want it for free, but he doesn’t seem to be putting in any effort other than posting an ad and expecting it to come to him.
      I’m not sure how much effort to hunt for something he’s really putting in to it.

      They are out there if you look. We found a 1st Gen RX7 a few years ago that had been sitting, and the person said we could take it for the cost of the tow. But, we had to find it.

      If he wants to throw in a bit of money, I know of a ton of stuff locally. Not classics, but, interesting stuff. I know a guy who has a pair of factory built Motorola Cup Hyundai race cars going cheap, another guy has a 95 Subaru Impreza with a 2.5L swap and some ProDrive parts.
      Damn.. now I’m hunting Kijiji to see what else is out there cheap… there goes the rest of my night.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      And he has $5000 laying around to boot, “I could just go grab an MGB for $5000″.

      You could easily grab a decent classic on that budget.

      Its kids like these that go online and say “Donate money to me so I can buy a PS3!”, and for some reason people give them that money.

  • avatar

    The meek shall inherit nothing.

  • avatar
    Jerry Sutherland

    couple of things here-the blog interview called the Graduate Alfa a 69-the movie came out in 67.

    The other is this kid.

    Suburbia held him back from a project? That’s a stunning lack of motivation and an insult to every real car guy who actually does get his hands dirty.

    I’d rather drop a 63 Chevy on him than give him the keys so he can drive the #@@$ out of it.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Reasonable people can disagree, but I sincerely hope that the future owners of my V8 Firebird decide to drive the #@@$ out of it. I would be very sad to see it become a show queen.

      I’m not giving it away for free though.

  • avatar
    DougD

    I’ll give him the benefit of the doubt that he’s sincere, but in my experience the purchase price is pretty insignificant to the total long term cost of ownership when properly maintaining a classic car.

    In short, if you can’t afford to buy it you certainly can’t afford to maintain it.

    If I was searching for someone to pass the torch to, someone to maintain my prized classic for future generations it would be A) Someone who knows what they’re doing and B) Someone who has the income to be able to do it. Don’t see evidence of either here..

  • avatar
    wmba

    Well, that explains it. The kid was born in Ontario, and came to Nova Scotia to go to college, he says. We get quite a few of those, and this one’s off his rocker.

    Naturally, knowing that Americans are geographically challenged at best with no idea that NS is certainly not Ontario, some of the comments show the usual sourness I’ve come to expect.

    deja1 harumphed:

    “Don’t believe I’ve ever met a Nova Scotian before. If he is representative of one, I don’t ever want to.”
    Don’t you worry, sir, he’s actually a rude Ontarian. See above. Now, where do you live? I’ll be happy to avoid your locale in my travels….. You’re welcome!

    acuraandy said: “@dejal: Ever seen Trailer Park Boys? There ya go…”
    Yup, Bubbles and the boys are about as equivalent to Nova Scotia
    as CSI is of advanced crime investigation in the US. Pure fantasy.

    DC Bruce, in a triumph of intellect similar to his advocacy to always using the brakes, and never gearing down, put forth this gem: “The VWs are entertaining to drive at the low speeds which Nova Scotia roads will permit and perfectly capable of maintaining 60 mph on varied terrain, moderately loaded.”

    Well thanks for this nugget of condescension, sir. Actually, a horse will suffice on varied terrain, moderately loaded. But on the great curvy backroads we have, I much prefer my Legacy GT.

    As a Nova Scotian, I feel I must defend my home from silly comments made by people who haven’t even been here. Ah yes, internet judgement delivered by bias and no facts is normal, I know.

    Anyway, the kid is from Ontario, Kreindler’s home base. His mindset I have yet to appreciate, it seems to take a while for us Bluenosers to get to grips with those super-hip Upper Canadians. But I hold out hope for a breakthrough sometime in the future.

    • 0 avatar
      acuraandy

      “Ever seen Trailer Park Boys? There ya go…’ ‘Yup, Bubbles and the boys are about as equivalent to Nova Scotia as CSI is of advanced crime investigation in the US. Pure fantasy.’

      A good friend of mine is originally from Nova Scotia. I was just trying to be funny. Guess I wasn’t. SORRY :) On behalf of the United States of America, I apologize. Besides, Canada is in MUCH better shape than the US is at the moment.

      • 0 avatar
        pgcooldad

        Don’t include me on this. I love all Canadians – even the ones that threw me out of a few bars on my drunken nights in Windsor back when I was a light weight 19 or 20 year old.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      Wow. I must of missed you when I visited NS some years ago. Because none of the folks I met had such a chip on their shoulder. The reference to NS roads was not “condescension” it alluded to the fact that, unlike central Canada (e.g. Ontario), NS doesn’t have many roads that are long, straight, flat and high-speed, where the VW’s absolute top speed of 65 mph (and aerodynamic instability) would be a problem. From my recollection of visiting NS (admittedly, about 25 years ago), that description fit most the roads which I remember.

      I assume you’ve also never driven a VW Beetle. Sports cars they’re not, but their handling is rather nimble so long as you are going moderate speeds (less than 60 mph) and respect and account for the tendency of the car to exhibit trailing throttle oversteer. Even better, putting modern radial tires on a VW (in place of the unpredictable and generally lousy bias-plies available at the time) would ameliorate a lot of those undesirable characteristics.

    • 0 avatar
      wstarvingteacher

      I am an american who has seen Nova Scotia and driven through it. Curiously enough I drove from the Newfoundland Ferry at Port o Basque (probably spelled wrong). What I drove was a brand new vw (1966) with new for the time bias ply tires. The rears were snow and mud for the recently passed winter in Newfoundland.

      The place is so beautiful that I don’t remember how I drove. Just what I saw. I found the Nova Scotians to be just like the Newfies before them. Friendly if I was friendly. Withdrawn if I was. Curiously enough almost everyone else I met on that 7,000 mile trip was exactly the same in that way.

      Personally I don’t care if this kid gets his car or not. I have spent some time wondering if this is really an ad or a troll article to stir things up. I have a 57 chev and he cannot have it. If he would like a 72 yamaha 650 with a frozen motor we might be able to talk. I think if he would haul it away, he can have it but it’s a long way from East Texas to any part of Nova Scotia. Sounds like more work than he’s willing to do.

      Anyway, wishing my best to all the upset Canadians in the readership and suggest we all not take ourselves too seriously. I treasure my memories of my time in the frozen north and it’s a fun place to visit (may-sept). Feel free to throw darts at this comment if you feel you must.

  • avatar
    70Cougar

    If someone reading this will give me a new car, I will make it vintage and give it some history and return it in 20 years. It would have to be Japanese or American. I can’t afford to make a German car vintage.

  • avatar
    Wojo

    I can sympathize with him, since I’m also a college student looking to obtain a classic car. That’s where the similarities end though; I’m actually looking to spend real money (that I earned myself) and have accepted the fact that it won’t be a year-rounder.

    I myself am searching for a 60’s convertible for summer driving and maybe a road trip or two. My only major requirements are that it must be complete and solid. My dream car is a ’61-’64 Cadillac (tail fins, FTW!), but I’m not entirely set on one. I’ve been searching craigslist for months now and have learned how truly hard it can be to find something decent. Barrett-Jackson and nadaguides.com have really ruined it for the younger generation.

    Thanks to them, classic and muscle car values have gone out of reach for anything halfway decent; every schmo on craigslist think he’s sitting on a gold mine because he saw a car “kinda like his” go for six-figures on TV or because NADA said it was worth $XX,XXX (they ALWAYS quote the high retail price for some reason).

    I sincerely wish him good luck.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      Wojo – go find yourself a 80s or 90s Mustang ‘vert. The price will likely be fair and you can still get parts for it from junkyards. Buy a V-6 and upgrade it. Sell it and reap the rewards of the sweat equity and move up to something more appealing. Repeat. Often. I did it about a dozen times when I was in my 20s. Do it before you get married with a mortgage and childcare costs. Or – save up the money and have a smaller mortgage.

  • avatar
    jeffzekas

    There are lots of old BMW and Volvo motorcars for $500 to $1,000 here in Northern California… not free, but close enough! As my buddy, Bill, once said, “Any car that runs is worth $500 minimum.”

  • avatar
    joe_thousandaire

    I hope someone does give this kid a Miata. In either hot-pink or that ‘fake-ass MG green’. I’m pretty sure that’s not what he was thinking when he said ‘classic car’. That would be the equivalent of asking for a Tonka Truck for Christmas and getting Barbie’s Dream Car.

  • avatar
    jimbobjoe

    I feel that a variation of this ad could be successful. The main problem is wanting to drive the crap out of the car.

    My step-father is involved in the antique automobile community. They fret that there will be no one interested in taking over their passions when they die (and most of them are indeed dying.) The cars will of course find some type of home (I doubt we’ll be sending any Model T’s to the crusher) but will the hobby live on? My step-father works with local vocational schools to get them acquainted with antique autos in the hope that a couple of students will get interested.

    There is little doubt in my mind that a few of those rich old fogeys would give away a couple of cars to someone who cared.

    Having said that, an ad is not the way to go. What he should do is embed himself in with a collector community, get to know everyone really well, be respected and trusted, and then maybe someone will make an offer or he can make a request like this.

    People give away free shit all the time. But it’s because of relationships.

  • avatar
    raph

    Bah, get this kd a 250 GTO with a clause in the contract saying when he sells it all procedes go to the previous owner.


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