By on January 26, 2012

As if the Ford Escape pricing details weren’t exciting enough, Toyota has priced their new 86 sports car in Japan, with a base price of $25,848. But to get anything approaching normal equipment levels, you’ll pay $31,000

Four trim levels – Customize Grade, G, GT and GT Limited – will be offered. The Customize Grade has unpainted bumpers and seems to be targeted at those who want to customize their 86. The G Grade will cost $31,000, a GT will cost $36,239 and a GT Limited will set you back $38,578.

Options include a limited-slip differential, projector headlights, aluminum pedals and an automatic transmission. A strong yen is going to make pricing the Scion FR-S difficult for Toyota USA. Scion previously claimed it would start below $30,000, but that’s hardly encouraging in the context of “affordable sports car”.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

76 Comments on “Toyota 86 Priced At $25,848 In Japan...”


  • avatar
    Domestic Hearse

    Holy angry Pokemon, Batman.

  • avatar
    dwford

    One thing we have learned here over the years is that foreign market pricing cannot be directly translated into US pricing. Let’s wait and see what it really is going to cost here before getting crazy about it.

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    i do like this car alot. it should give porsche a run for its money.

    • 0 avatar
      Zombo

      Which Porsche is that – the 968 last made in 1995 ? That was the last 4 cylinder powered front engine/rear drive car Porsche made , unless you want to compare apples to oranges .

      http://www.ridelust.com/coming-soon-a-new-four-cylinder-porsche/

  • avatar
    duffman13

    I’ll go along with the group of people saying that you can’t compare Japanese prices to USD.

    Consider these points.
    -There are Suby and Scion versions in the US.
    -Significantly less power and less complex drivetrain than the WRX
    -Base WRX is $25.5k, premium at 28k
    -Premium WRX and BRZ are spec’ed similarly with the exception of HIDs and Nav standard on the BRZ
    -Scion will be decontented compared to BRZ.
    -Suby has already said pricing for the BRZ premium will be in the neighborhood of $24-25k
    -Scion doesn’t sell a single car that starts over $20k.
    -Hyundai genesis 2.0T and the mustang V6 start in the $23-24k range

    Looking at those facts, and assuming that:

    a) The FR-S must be cheaper than the BRZ if it loses out on some of the standard squipment the BRZ gets
    b) Subaru is being honest on price
    c) Subaru actually wants to sell some of these, which they won’t if they price it higher than a WRX base model

    I’ve come to the conclusion that pricing will probably end up at $24.5 for the BRZ and $23k for the FR-S. Any higher and they lose out on price to the competition, and the low power number hurts them enough already to magazine racers.

    At $24k I’ll sure as hell buy one though. Especially if the rumors of a factory supercharger add-on coming down the pike in a couple years are true.

    • 0 avatar

      A Genesis Coupe is $22,250. It will have to be competitive, price-wise, for this car to be relevant to the target buyer.

      • 0 avatar
        moorewr

        I’m thinking the Scion will start circa $23k, and the Subaru will about $1000 higher in respective trims..

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        +1

        $22,500 is where the 86 needs to be in base configuration. $38k loaded? Are they joking? You can get a 370Z for $31k!

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        Concur wholeheartedly.

        With the Genesis getting all that extra HP from the new 2.0T, i’d be surprised if it doesn’t see its price jump a bit, maybe closer to $24k.

        I still think even given its power disadvantage that the FR-S is a good value at under $24k. After the initial rush I’m sure you could get them in the low $22,xxx range through something like Truecar or USAA.

    • 0 avatar
      JimR

      This car was made from the beginning to loosen the pockets who know the value of a used S2000 or STI versus a new car. The ’86 is an enthusiast machine that brings in sports car buyers for all the established reasons, and they’re not so easily fogged and misdirected by set-piece perceptions fed to applicance car buyers.

      The fathers of the FT-86 know they’re making a hard landing in a soft market when it comes to price. They’ve admitted on the front end that it won’t net huge margins, so count on a long and fruitful model run with many variants/trims over the years. For the reasons presented above, I think a cheap starting price is on the table for America. Way cheaper than Japan.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      If the 86 comes in over $25K base price here in the states Toyota has a big problem. As others have noted the Genesis coupe is lower in price with more content. You can also toss in the Camaro and Mustang in that price range, which are no slouches with a V6 under the hood.

      As Derek noted the strong Yen could be a big issue. BUT, you generally can’t look at Euro/Japanese/Aussie pricing for a car and get a 1:1 relationship on what it will sell for in the US.

      When Pontiac was selling the G8, a loaded out G8 GT was about $32K, the exact same car in Aus was $54K (Aussie $$$). Have to wait and see where it falls – but $22.5K I agree whole heartedly is the required sweet spot for this to sell.

    • 0 avatar
      imag

      JMII – You can get a 370 Sport package for less than that. Just ask one of the dealers – you’ll pick one up for invoice easy.

  • avatar
    A Caving Ape

    But the yen is strong right now. Some back of the envelope googling indicates that at the 2008 exchange rate this would be going for just $20,000. I suspect the actual US pricing will split that difference.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    there’s no doubt in my mind that they will sell it for the price of a WRX

    you may go on about non turbo and not 4wd and how it’s not “good value” because it’s cheaper to make

    that’s not the point

    sure the V6 Mustangs and Camaros will probably kill it in a straight line but the reality is there’s a lot of pent up demand for it so they’ll sell it for what they fanboys will pay for it

    now maybe 2yrs down the track when the lustre has fallen off and a turbo version is released… then you’ll see the price fall sharply

    • 0 avatar
      srogers

      You make a realistic point. This is about supply and demand, and the demand is going to be outstripping supply for while, if posters claiming “I’m a goin’ to buy one” are an indication.

      With the Yen being so high, I don’t think that Toyota/Scion will be wanting to sell these at a loss.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        Some of us claim I’m going to buy one don’t intend on doing it immediately.

        I’m part of that camp for a few reasons:
        -wait for the aftermarket to pick up, specifically suspension bits like shocks and camber plates
        -want to see where it slots in SCCA autocross
        -I don’t do 2 car payments at once. Wife’s car is not paid off until 2014 so this car will wait until then.

        So while I fully intend on buying it, I’m certainly not going to be the first one in my neighborhood with it.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      I think a big part of the pent up demand is the promise that this car will be affordable. Price it too high, and I bet that demand shrivels pretty quick.

      Even on forums and blogs this car is taking criticism for relatively low power for the price. There aren’t enough people that value the low weight (or know what to do with it) enough to sell this for a premium. Compound that with impractical size and it has to be under $25k or it will be DOA.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      I’m pretty sure the V6 Mustang with the optional wheels (the base wheels/tires suck) which isn’t an expensive add would do quite well in the twisties, and still murder it in a straight line.

  • avatar
    patman

    Wow. Those prices are going to 86 the car.

    At those prices it’s going to be just another fly buzzing around the backside of the Mustang & Camaro ponies in the sporty coupe world.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      That’s about as stellar a response as I’ve read in some time.

      The Toyota FT-86: 86′d by its price.

      If this thing is priced anywhere near the levels assumed, it may make for a true limited edition collectible, though.

    • 0 avatar
      grzydj

      Neither the Mustang or the Camaro are sporty coupes, they’re Pony cars.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        And if your argument then is they are not a competitor, than the prospects for the 86 are even bleaker.

        The RX-8 is dead and was selling at what 100 units a month before it was killed?

        The 370Z? Doesn’t sell in any kind of volume.

        Hyundai Genesis coupe in any flavor? Doesn’t sell in any kind of volume.

        Scion tC? Well its a stretch because its a front driver for starters but again, doesn’t sell in any meaningful volume.

        I wouldn’t be a bit surprised that if you got RX-8 + 370Z + Genesis coupe + Scion tC you still don’t equal the Mustang or the Camaro in monthly sales.

        So your argument becomes that the 86 (and Subbie counterpart) will create a fresh demand for buyers who are turning up their nose at other offerings in a very narrow segment, and will suck away sales not from the affordable sport coupe segment, but from some other segment (and not pony cars as you’re implying there is no cross shopping).

        I think that is more than a long shot. For the 86 to be a success buyers better cross shop Camaro/Mustang and get sucked away – otherwise there is no market (beyond the first few months out of the gate – depending on price).

        • 0 avatar

          I’m glad this car exists but it seems like the people who want it are “stuck in the folks basement” type dreamers who can barely afford to pour money into a crappy 10 year old tuner cars. In 2002-2005, at the peak of the AE86 craze, there were a lot of early 20-somethings with good jobs and the inclination to buy this car. Now they are a decade older with different priorities. I love the car, but I really don’t see a big pool of buyers for it.

      • 0 avatar
        patman

        @APaGttH

        Last time they posted a fun cars sales chart here the numbers were startling. It was the Mustang and Camaro in the first two spots, a fair sized drop to the Challenger and Mini and everything else was fighting for scraps.

        Those four cars you listed would be rounding errors for the pony cars and I’m not sure that everything else on that list together would add up to as much as the Mustang & Camaro’s combined volume.

        http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2010/07/chart-of-the-day-weekend-toy-sales-june-and-first-half-of-2010/

        Note to editor: Hey, how about running that one again next time you’re doing sales charts please?

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Yep, the market for Asian coupes in the US is small since they have a hard time competing on price against the domestic pony cars, nevermind the nostalgia.

  • avatar
    Robert Fahey

    The Scion badge implies a young target buyer whose pain limit is probably $25k at most.

  • avatar
    threeer

    Hmmm…anything beyond $25k would potentially sink any thoughts we’ve had of trading up the tC for the FS-R…never mind making it a hard sell against the Mustang (sorry…I know that the Mustang and FS-R tend to different driving dynamics, but somebody wanting to plunk down mid $20s for a sporty coupe will look at both).

  • avatar
    deanst

    I guess it answers the question “What would Maxwell Smart drive?”.

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    I’m thinking….the Gen-2 Rx-7 reborn for our times. Difficult to benchmark it as of yet as no direct equivalent 944 exists to compare it against.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Since I have an RX-8 with 58,000 trouble free miles on it (as in, the most reliable car I’ve ever owned, past CamCords included), and as I’m about to meet up with a RX8club member with 200,000+ miles on his 2004 RX-8 with his original Renesis Series 1 still purring along nicely for a pros/cons of premix shoot the shit, the 86 appeals to me for many of the same reasons I love my RX-8.

      With all the claims of the Renesis being unreliable, a deeper search for accuracy reveals a majority of problematic motors were 1) early year slushboxes (which has one oil cooler vs the 2 coolers used in the manual trans version), 2) driven in extremely hot climates (Arizona and Nevada, as examples), 3) not properly flogged on a regular basis (which a rotary should be, and it’s hard to flog an automatic properly given its 7500rpm redline vs the 9500rpm redline of the higher power motor paired with the manual), and 4) a higher percentage of problems amongst those who opted to go the forced induction route at a very early adopter stage.

      The FT-86 will certainly be more fuel conscious, utilize a conventional and common Toyota/Subaru motor that far more mechanics will be able to service/mod (while being more receptive to being boosted without concerns of problems), and a teeny bit gruntier at lower rpm.

      However, the RX-8 offers more stock HP (at higher RPM which is loved by the rotary), a standard limited slip differential, two very usable rear seats that actual adults can fit in, ride quality that would shock (positively) anyone not having driven or being driven in one (base suspension – I can’t speak to the R3) and convince them it’s sublime as a daily driver, handling on a magnitude that I doubt the FT-86 will be able to match in stock form, and mine has proven that even relatively deep snow is not a problem with a good set of snow shoes (maybe the 86 will be as capable).

      What I’m getting at is that if they price this without a really careful balancing act, they’ll lose a lot of formerly interested patrons to other cars, many of which will be far less expensive and of the used variety.

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    Anyone hear anything on production numbers? TopGear has a review on their website and mentioned only 1k were headed to the UK. I thought I read something as low as 3k for Canada. These sound like ridiculously low numbers.

    Doesn’t the miata move about 20k units per year? You would think Toyota/Subaru could match that with a car that has a roof. If the numbers really are that low, this thing will be pretty rare and it won’t matter what the msrp is – dealers will gouge.

  • avatar
    stottpie

    200hp at 25k, this car makes no sense.

    the wrx will perform better in any measurable attribute.

    • 0 avatar
      stuntmonkey

      It makes perfect sense in CDN. Same price range as the Si and GTi, lower end of the Genesis Coupe, and less than starting for WRX.

      “Sports coupe”, not “Sports car”.

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        I agree. A base WRX starts from $32,495. Not in the same class as a $25k car.

      • 0 avatar
        stottpie

        in all fairness, this article is talking about US dollars, and the WRX US costs around what, 26k?

      • 0 avatar
        wsn

        stottpie, there is a difference between “in US dollars” and “US pricing”.

        The 86′s “Japan pricing” “in US dollars” is $25k USD.
        The WRX’s “Canada pricing” “in US dollars” is $32k USD.

        Both Japan and Canada are know to have higher car prices than the US, so they are comparable. If you want to refute me, you need to provide the “Japan pricing” of an WRX and show that it’s not much more expensive than the 86.

      • 0 avatar
        stottpie

        i think i must have misunderstood.

        i was just trying to point out that (in the US), pricing the 86 at 25k is right on top of the WRX

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        But Canadian prices (even at a time when the currency in near par with the USD) make no sense to Americans, and there are 1000% more Americans than Canadians.

        I’m not insulting Canadians in the slightest, but pointing out the economies of scale issue that manufacturers have to adjust for when trying to compete in a much larger, more competitive, more ‘paradox of choice’ fragmented American auto market.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      It is a good thing they can’t measure “understeerslikeapiggedness”.

      • 0 avatar
        stottpie

        i literally just test drove the 2012 wrx sedan 30 minutes ago. i disagree with your understeer assessment. while it does have mild understeer, virtually all cars do, and you can count on the FRS having some built in understeer as well.

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        Did you autocross it on your test drive? Did you really push it through a tight mountain road? I owned a 2001 2.5RS for 4 years and while it was reasonably quick around an auto-x course, it wasn’t as much fun as I’d hoped because I fought that lump of metal hanging off the nose of the car most of the time. On the other hand, a Miata on similar roads is an absolute delight.

        The WRX is a great car and if I could only have 1 car, it would be battling at the top. It is a car that does a lot of things really, really well, but it compromises a well-balanced, small chassis in order to seat five and accommodate AWD. My paid-off 4Runner will take care of the bad weather driving and hauling my upcoming bundle of joy. I fully intend on buying an FR-S or BRZ when we’re no longer stuck with rear facing child seats, though. I haven’t even driven the darn thing, but I’ve never read reviews that pander to what I want out of a fun-to-drive like this before.

  • avatar

    FWIW I don’t think most people interested in this car will cross-shop it with a Camaro or ‘Stang V6. Two totally different buyers that wouldn’t be caught dead in the respective American/Import alternative.
    Ditto the MX-5.

    • 0 avatar
      srogers

      I agree. The 0-60 per dollar crowd will not be shopping for this car.

      • 0 avatar
        grzydj

        I was trying to write a Javascript ap that automatically spams articles about the FT-86/BRZ with comments about Mustangs and Camaros, but it looks like somebody has already written one.

    • 0 avatar
      Mikemannn

      I don’t think that’s true. I own a ’11 v6 mustang, and bought it because there wasn’t anything approaching the performance for the money regardless of brand. If this car was out when I was shopping, it would have been on the extremely short list. I may still trade in my Mustang on it depending where it sits when it gets here. I’m not about the 1/4 mile times, and neither are most of the other v6 owners I’ve met. The car actually handles, and with a bit of help to the suspension, it’s actually quite capable.

      I know a lot of other current-get Mustang v6 owners who were looking for a coupe with decent performance for a certain amount of money who never expected to buy domestic but did. I think Toyota will have a problem finding a market for it.

      Now, a V8 Mustang/Camaro owner likely wouldn’t cross shop the FRS/BRZ…

  • avatar
    alluster

    For those complaining about the price, the Saturn Sky similar to this car in every possible way except being a vert, was priced $27K to $33K in 2007. That’s around $30K in today’s money. I think the FR-S is a great deal at $25K if you consider how advanced this is to the Sky.

    Should have been badged as a Toyota though. Will be easier to command $25K as a Toyota, sales would easily be 2 or 3 times as many and could be used to bolster Toyota’s image as a builder of sport cars and hybrids.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      That the Sky is a convertible and this is (at least now) not makes ALL the difference in the world.

      Hell, the premium on the last generation Chrysler Sebring and Sebring Convertible was at least 5 or 6 large in real world, non-MSRP terms.

      Convertibles do get a premium in the real world because they’re bought by rental agencies for duty in beautiful, tourist-y areas, or they’re bought by consumers that simply must have a convertible (an admittedly small slice of the buying pie).

      At anything over 21k USD for a base model, give or take a grand, and I just fail to see how this makes for a compelling case except for a very niche market of (a rapidly declining, given the economy and less passion given demographic trends) tuner-tweener market.

      200 naturally aspirated bhp on a rwd platform with (presumably) great reflexes, a snick-snick manual shifter, and at least decent brakes (all components being easily upgradeable) is a beautiful starting point for an often ignored slice of the buying public, but not if the price comes close to or exceeds that of cars that will smoke this in a straight line or on a track bone stock.

      I’d love to see the $$$ figures on the tuner/aftermarket segment now vs. circa-2006, but I’d probably bet that there’s nowhere near the level of enthusiasm in terms of money shelled out now that there was then.

      And I love the design philosophy behind this vehicle as well as its aesthetics, but the reality is that the masses are stuck in a very price sensitive economy at present (evidenced by renewed subprime credit leases & highly subsidized ones at that).

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Maybe that’s why the volume estimates published by Motor Trend are infinitessimal. Supposedly, Subaru and Scion are planning on importing 3,000 a year each. If that turns out to be the case, these will be very expensive little cars indeed, no matter what the window sticker says.

  • avatar
    stryker1

    Fail. My interest in this car just evaporated. “$38,578?”, you could buy a well equipped 370z for that money. Not to mention V8 mustangs, camaro, Genesis 3.8 Track comes in at 9k less, and you get way more car for the money. Unless there’s a drastic price adjustment for the US market, this thing is DOA.

  • avatar
    Zombo

    So much for the low priced Scion brand . Makes you wonder why they just didn’t make it the new Toyota Celica . Then again that would go against the very bland and boring reputation Toyota has carefully been cultivating for it’s main name brand for years now !

  • avatar
    Shipwright

    This is a little off topic. What I find annoying (and Toyota is not the only manufacturer that does this) are cars that are supposedly sporty yet only offer limited slip differentials as an option. They should be standard, nothing says “Fail” to me more one tire peel outs.

  • avatar
    WRC555

    Those who had watched Initial D season 1 will buy this car regardless of price point.
    Those who watched Initial D season 4 will cross-shop this with the WRX/STI. :)

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Can someone link that, or the Top Gear review?

      I can’t find either and would really like to see them.

      Thanks.

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        Here is the Top Gear review that I referenced: http://www.topgear.com/uk/car-news/subaru-brz-first-drive-review-2011-12-03

        It’s fairly old, probably from the Tokyo Auto Show.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Thanks.

        I thought they reviewed it on the Top Gear BBC Show, maybe even handing it over The Stig for a go ’round.

        - I just read that link and appreciate that. If the review is semi-accurate, I highly doubt I’d ditch my RX-8 for this. It’s the right direction for Subaru and Toyota — especially Toyota, which hasn’t had a vehicle that could warm an enthusiast’s blood since the Supra or MR2 — if priced sensibly, though, at least in terms of pulling on purists’ heart strings (which may or may not make great business sense in the U.S.).

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    My generation of car enthusiasts grew up with Gran Turismo. And in Gran Turismo you start with a small amount of money to buy a car and modify it, and the best starting point throughout the series was the AE86. That’s more or less the only reason this car has gotten the fan following that it has outside japan today. It’s the dream car of thousand upon thousands of people from the the age of 25-though 35. So a lot of people has been waiting for a modern version of this car. Not to mention all the people who has gotten bored of large v6 driven automatic coupes with every gadget possible to make it safe and boring to drive. The only problem is offcourse money… A lot of the people who wants this car are, like mentioned, ‘mamas basements dreamers’ and a lot have allready started families and have kids and responsibilites outside owning a sportscar, so I’m not expecting it to be a treat against neither Porsche or Mustang sales. It may take some buyers away from the ‘hot hatches’ and fwd coupes. Honda and Hyundai might loose some potensial CR-Z and Veloster buyers :P

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      “potential CR-Z buyers”

      Isn’t that an oxymoron? ;)

    • 0 avatar
      Zombo

      Car buyers who are looking at much less costly fuel efficient front wheel drive cars like the Veloster and CRZ aren’t this car’s target market . Those looking at the Hyundai Genesis coupe are though as well as potential buyers of the WRX , Mustang , Camaro , and soon to be gone RX8 .

      • 0 avatar
        Zykotec

        I think a lot of the people in the market for such vehicles will be glad to have a rwd alernative, and coudn’t care less about the tiny fuel efficience loss. The RX8 , well I agree, as they will be lookign for an other alternative now, Nissan Z, possibly, Camaro and Mustang buyers, I think not…
        You should remember that the CR-Z was also supposed to be a modern version of the CR-X, although most people thinks it failed at that.

  • avatar
    L'avventura

    You know, it would be useful to put that price into context- I expect more out of TTAC. US dollar amounts are incredible deceiving when the price is in yen.

    This GT86 is priced comparably to the CR-Z. Which is around 2.3~2.5 million; which in turn is ~US$32,000.

    If you want to guess the US price, the US price of the CR-Z is a good place to place your bets around for the FR-S.

    • 0 avatar

      “If you want to guess the US price, the US price of the CR-Z is a good place to place your bets around for the FR-S.”

      Hogwash. That’s as much conjecture as anything that was published above by the author that you “expected more out of”. It’s a different class of car aimed at an entirely different audience.

      • 0 avatar
        L'avventura

        Its less conjecture and more logic, the likelihood is that it’ll be in the low-mid $20k for properly equipped model, which is where the CR-Z is at. They may not be similar cars, but both cars are Japanese-built “affordable” sports cars designed to recapture Japan’s “kuruma-banare” youth market.

        In its translation to the US market they will most definitely price it much lower than direct yen-to-dollar exchange would suggest.

        And it most definitely won’t be over $30k for a comparably equipped base model.

        Considering that TTAC has a “man in Japan”, which has unique insight into the Japanese market, and the fact that dollar-yen exchange rates are a significant topic of conversation on this blog. Putting this pricing into proper context is a bare minimum I would expect.

        While we’re at it, let’s put other Japanese entry-level sports cars into context, the base 370Z with a manual starts at $47,000 in Japan, the 7-AT 370Z in ST trim costs $59,000, the base Mazda MX-5 costs $30,100 with the Black tuned model starting around $40,000.

        Context is everything. Obviously paying $30-40k for a MX5 is ridiculous in dollar terms, or Cayman/Corvette level prices for a 370Z is a bit of joke, but that’s how it is in yen terms these days.

        2.4 million yen for a properly equipped GT86 is actually a good deal less than what the RX-8 is still sold for; which is 2.6 million to 3.12 million yen ($34-$40k). The story here is that Toyota actually priced the GT86 competitively in Japan, which should translate well to US and Europe, but that isn’t properly conveyed in this particular blog post.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Chances are the Scion FR-S will be somewhere between $22,850 and $26,995. You can quote me. It will have everything standard that is important, since I doubt they will offer A/C as an option requiring them to send four different trim levels to dealers. There will be manual FR-Ss and automatic FR-Ss. Everything else will be a dealer installed option, and the standard equipment level will approximate the Japanese market G grade car.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      What is “the important stuff” that will be standard?

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Power windows, locks, and mirrors; ABS 4-wheel disc brakes; traction and stability control; A/C; height adjustable driver seat, alloy wheels; 6-speed manual transmission; and some sort of stereo will be standard. It is possible that Bluetooth will be part of a dealer installed stereo package, but body colored bumpers will not be. In other words, the base model won’t be the tuner special it is in Japan, and the price will be within the parameters leaked in the past.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Thank you.

        Given that list, I assume that a limited slip differential, keyless entry & a passive alarm/anti-theft system will be standard on all models, too?

        Also, what will be the key differentiation between the 86 and the Subaru BRZ, in terms of features and/or pricing, if you know as of now?

        Thanks again.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    25 grand is a perfect price for this car. not base, out the door.

    why? because as you increase in cost, faster options become available (like the genesis coupe and 370Z), and the success of this car isn’t based on the 40 or so people on the FT-86 forums who have discussed and flamed about this car for the last two years but may not even have the means of buying one. its success is based on casual buyers who see a small, great handling RWD coupe and have not that much cash.

    if what i think is true, and that greedy bastard toyota/scion dealers slap on a 5 grand additional dealer mark-up on every 86 they get their hands on, then i think this limited production car will be DOA.

    the same goes for the BRZ, except that the better competition will be sitting on the DEALER LOT in the form of WRX and STi imprezas.

  • avatar

    Do these cars have any charisma? To me they look like typical FWD Asian cars. Like Integra e.g. And what is the point of offering two identical cars under different brands? Will it be better than AWD Impreza?

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      Have you been following this car at all on here? The “charisma” is in the RWD layout, the front-mid engine location, and the lower CoG from the boxer engine. It doesnt look like typical FWD Asian cars, FWD Asian cars were designed to look like RWD cars.

      Identical cars from different brands? To reduce development costs, mostly. Some buyers wouldn’t be caught dead in a Scion, and Subaru needed/wanted a sports car to round out thier lineup. Many people won’t even look twice at a Subie because they are kind of ugly. Who cares as long as we get a good car from it?

      Better than an AWD Impreza?? Assuming you are talking specifically about the WRX, then I suppose it would depend on how you define “better”. They are not really comparable cars in almost any way besides projected pricing. If you are looking for a N/A RWD sport coupe, you are not shopping WRX. Then again if you need usable back seat room and 4drs in your $25k performance car, the 86 is off your list. If all you care about is pure performance, I imagine the WRX is going to be better. The standard turbo motor obviously has more tuning potential, the AWD chassis grip is amazing, dozens of tuning companies are devoted to the WRX market, you can bring 3 buddies from work to lunch in your WRX easily, baby seats fit OK in back, etc, etc. But lets face it… no matter how much I love the WRX/STI, its ugly. My wife hates them. My teenage daughter and her friends hate them. They are pure guys cars, loved purely for thier performance potential. And while AWD grip is great, RWD is more fun, more pure. Turbo motors cannot match the linear power delivery of a nicely tuned NA motor. This is a Miata with a hardtop and more power, you dont see anyone complaining that the Miata needs AWD.

  • avatar
    Grahambo

    Props to L’avventura for the eminently reasonable and well reasoned posts above. If this car FEELS as good as initial reports suggest, then sign me up. I don’t care if a Mustang or Genesis Coupe will crucify it from a numbers perspective. Living in LA for four years taught me that there will always be someone (thousands, actually) who will have a faster ride . . . a more expensive ride . . . a more exclusive ride. Just give me harmony, balance and connectness, the essence of fun to drive — “internal” happiness as opposed to “external” happiness. In other words, give me a modern day 944 (with a reduced cost of ownership) — which I think and hope this will turn out to be.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • J & J Sutherland, Canada
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India