By on January 6, 2012

I live in the country, well outside city limits in the septic tank/well/propane tank kind of area. Like many that live out where the blacktop ends, we have some farm animals, over a mile of fencing and a pasture in need of TLC. Since I’m a DINK and have a day job that has nothing to do with my animal husbandry, I’m apparently the perfect demographic for a luxury pickup. True to form, the last 5 times I shopped, I wanted a pickup truck. Badly. Every time it came time to put money down however, I ended up with a sedan, station wagon or SUV. Still, I’m not ashamed to admit my loins burn for a “cowboy Cadillac”, and now that my GMC Envoy has 140,000 miles on the clock it’s time for a 6,000lb tow-capable replacement. Since the HD pickup trucks are honestly overkill for the majority of us, I hit Ford up for an F-150 Platinum to see if I should take the plunge.


The F-150 has been Ford’s best-selling nameplate and the best-selling vehicle for 30 years and the best-selling truck for 35 years. If you wonder how the F-150 manages to be all things to so many buyers, you have to look at the F-150 as if it were several different vehicles that share the same name. With 10 different models ranging from the $22,990 no-frills XL to a nearly $56,000 Platinum model, few other vehicles have a price spread like the F-150. Adding to your shopping dilemma is a line-up with four different engines, three cab sizes, four bed sizes and more axle options than you can shake a stick at. For our review we were given the high end F-150 Platinum 4×4 with the 5.0L V8.

In 2009 Ford released the 12th generation F-150 which was bigger in almost every way compared to the 2008 model, adding a taller hood, bigger cabs and a nifty tailgate spoiler. In typical Ford fashion, the powertrains were largely carried over and we had to wait until 2011 to get the full picture of the “completely new” F-150. Let’s shake up the typical review format by talking engines first: the 2009 and 2010 F-150s were V8-only trucks, with the old 4.6L or 5.4L V8 under the hood. 2011 brought not one but four new engines to the F-150; two V6 options and two hefty V8s. All engines for 2011, including the base V6, are mated to Ford’s six-speed automatic transmission and optional 4WD.

Platinum F-150s come with a standard “Coyote” 5.0L V8 (as our model was equipped) which delivers a healthy 360HP and 380lb-ft at 5500 and 4250 RPM. Our 4×4 equipped tester delivered a 6.75-second sprint to 60. If you have displacement envy, you can jump up to the 411HP and 434lb-ft 6.2L V8 for an extra $2755, but the ringer in the group is the 3.5L Ecoboost V6 model which delivers 365HP at 5000RPM and a whopping 420lb-ft of twist at a diesel like 2500RPM for only $895 more than the base 5.0L V8. If the bang-for-the-buck doesn’t pique your interest, the EPA numbers on the 4×4 models might: 14/19 for the 5.0, 12/16 for the 6.2 and 15/21 for the Ecoboost (eco is a relative term apparently). While the 6.2L V8 sounds incredible, a short towing demo I had in an Ecoboost V6 (and the larger payload capacity of the Ecoboost model) made me doubt whether anyone would be better off with the big-daddy V8. The only downside we noticed: slight turbo lag at the stoplights.


On the outside, Platinum models are distinguished with a revised grille that attempts to soften the bold lines worn by its blue-collar brethren with perforated bars. Unique wheels and an enormous brushed-aluminum panel on the tailgate tagged with “PLATINUM” complete the “I run the company” image. While the badging is more subtle than an Escalade, it still lets other F-150 drivers know how you roll.

GM’s pickups feature your choice of a “work-truck” interior, or a car-like dashboard borrowed from GM’s full-size SUVs while Dodge’s mantra seems to just be “cheap plastic”. Instead of taking either approach, Ford uses one interior theme for all models but as you climb the price-ladder, bits and pieces are swapped out for swankier duds. The base XL gets a rubbery steering wheel, mono-tone dashboard and a durable black plastic center console while top-end F-150s can be had with two-tone dashes, a stitched pleather gauge hood, and faux-wood trim or acres of brushed aluminum. Unlike some of GM’s attempts at “tarting-up” their work trucks, the F-150 feels comfortable all-dressed up.


Joining the new engines for 2011 is a tweaked instrument cluster which now sports a 4.2-inch LCD between the speedo and tach (not offered on the F-150 XL, optional on XLT and standard on other F-150s). The screen is used for the usual trip computer and vehicles settings as well as displaying off-road information like vehicle pitch and yaw. Joining the snazzy in-dash LCD on the Platinum model is a revised steering wheel, standard backup camera, ambient lighting, power-lowering running boards, integrated trailer brake controller, remote start, 110V power outlet, power folding mirrors, power tilt/telescoping steering wheel, backup sensors, heated and cooled seats, and dual-zone climate control. If you don’t plan on adding a lumber rack, an optional sunroof is available, as is Ford’s SYNC navigation. MyTouch critics will be pleased to note that the updates SYNC system hasn’t made its way to the F-150 just yet. The up-side is improved reliability and a snappier interface, the downside is the loss of WiFi connectivity and the second USB port, a small price to pay in my mind. While the build quality isn’t up to Audi levels, entry level luxury shoppers will find just about every creature comfort they could ask for.

The Platinum can only be had with the four-door “SuperCrew” cab and as a result, the payload suffers somewhat starting at 1,800lbs with the 5.0L V8 and 2WD, jumping to 2,000 with the Ecoboost V6, dropping sharply to 1,680lbs due to the added weight of the 6.2L V8. These are some serious hauling numbers that required a ¾ ton pickup truck to achieve not too long ago. Thisare a hair shy of the 3100lb payload capacity mentioned in some F-150 ads, possible in only two of the 57 axle/cab/engine combinations.  Compared to the Ram and Chevy, the Ford offers consistently higher payload capacities but more configuration options to wade through, so be sure to check the configuration and the door labels on your truck before you add a pallet of concrete to your weekend.

For the trailer-loving truck-buyer, the endless battle between the big-three for top-dog towing numbers has resulted in some impressive figures. Depending on your axle ratio and drive (2WD or 4WD) choice, towing tops out at a whopping 11,300lbs for the Ecoboost, 11,200 for the 6.2L V8 and a notably lower but still substantial 9,500lbs with the base 5.0L V8. Making towing easier, Ford includes an integrated trailer brake controller standard on the Platinum and a few other F-150 models. If you tow regularly and care about maintenance on your rig, there’s now an app for that. While Ford obviously ripped Apple with their “Truck App” name, it does provide some handy features like keeping track of the mileage on 10 different trailers and remembering the brake gain for each trailer. In order to keep your “distance to empty” figures more accurate, it also recalculates the averages when you have a trailer connected.

If you’re looking at the Platinum, you’d better have deep pockets Then again, if you’re the weekend warrior type, it’s cheaper than your comparable BMW X5. Our tester started with a sticker of $44,325 on top of which was added a $470 electronic locking axle, 6-1/2-foot bed, $325 folding side-steps and a $2,465 option package which included a sunroof and navigation system taking our tester to the nose-bleed section at $52,405. If that price frightens you, $27,670 buys you my personal favorite: the F-150 XL with the Ecoboost V6, 8-foot bed, 3.55:1 locking rear axle, cloth seats, power accessories, CD player and cruise control. Configured in this way the F-150 delivers 3060lbs of payload capacity and 9,800lbs of towing ability.

At the end of the week I found myself more in love with trucks than when I started. There was just one problem. The F-150 is huge. As with most vehicles these days the F-150 has been growing like the Stay Pufft Marshmallow Man. While I used to feel like a man when I was in college out muddin’ in my buddy’s F-150, the 2011 Ford makes me feel small, and adult-Alex has at least 40lbs on his former college self. With the CUV craze killing off SUV towing capacity, the day for me to finally take the truck plunge is rapidly approaching. The four-door luxury pickup truck may be the right truck for an Austin professional with a ranchette in the burbs, but I can’t shake the feeling that I would be best served lusting for the new Ford Ranger from afar and buying a diesel Touareg. I’d still dream pickup dreams in my sleep however.

 

Ford provided the vehicle for our review, insurance and one tank of gas.

Statistics as tested

0-30: 2.514 Seconds

0-60: 6.75 Seconds

Fuel Economy: over 555 miles, 17.0MPG

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84 Comments on “Review: 2012 Ford F-150 Platinum 5.0L V8...”


  • avatar
    replica

    That is a handsome shade of dookie.

  • avatar
    AMC_CJ

    North of $50k is ridiculous for a truck with spark plugs.

    Kind of like the Ram express better; 390hp, $22k; Ford can keep their brushed aluminum dash and stupid gadgets for the $30k difference.

    Also, the Ecoboost V6. I’m sure it makes sense for the “weekend warrior” type, but I’d never trust one for regular commercial use.

    • 0 avatar
      replica

      I agree, but this isn’t a work truck. I have doubts most of them will ever tow anything heavier than small trailers with jet skis on them.

    • 0 avatar
      FJ60LandCruiser

      >>North of $50k is ridiculous for a truck with spark plugs.

      How Ford is managing to sell these to people apparently oblivious to the fact you can get a well-equipped diesel 4×4 HD for less than 50 grand is a mystery.

      But they are, since the “Platiunum” editions all over the place.

      • 0 avatar
        DUCKRACER

        I got my 5.0 2012 F-150 PLATINUM 4X4 6.5 ft., bed tailgate steps, side steps for $49k OUT THE DOOR.

        I wanted a V8 RWD luxury vehicle. Since Ford no longer makes a Crown Vic, this is perfect for me because I will use it occasoinally use it to carry my dirt bikes out to the Mojave desert for some 2 wheel fun.
        No Mercedez could fill these requirements.

        Of course, it helps that it was the 6th vehicle I have purchased from this dealer.

      • 0 avatar
        DUCKRACER

        Gonna ruin your day. Ford will make a PLATINUM edition for the 2013/4 F-250. I bet they sell like hotcakes….

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Commercial buyers aren’t the target market for a $50,000 rhinestone cowboy of a truck.

    • 0 avatar
      Dukeboy01

      I can’t see someone paying $50,000 for a truck and then really getting the full use out of it as God and Henry Ford intended. Is someone really going to shell out a third of the cost of the average Midwestern home for a pickup and then haul gravel in it? Take it into the woods? Pull up stumps? I don’t think so.

      The Ford Platinum edition, GMC Denali trim level, Ram Big Horn editions, and the Caddy EXT aren’t trucks for people who really need a truck to accomplish a task, unless that task is impressing the other suburban soccer moms at the mall.

      I’ll take my ’95 GMC Sierra 2WD with the 305 V-8, windows you roll down yourself, the bedliner I rolled in myself, and 167,000 miles on the clock over the payments on a brand new truck I’d be constantly fretting over.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        I have a lot of customers who do tow big boats, travel trailers, toy haulers, horse trailers, etc, and so can make use of a full size truck or SUV. Some of them use it as their general day to day vehicle as well, so they want the creature comforts, and many who tow often tow fairly long distances, so it’s worth it to them to be able to do it with all of the amenities at hand.

        A $20K Fusion will move your family around just as well as a $50K Mercedes E-Class, but if you have the means and want the luxury, what’s wrong with paying more for the vehicle that gives it to you?

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        While the $50K E-class is kept in pristine condition in order to avoid turn in fees come lease conclusion, a work truck is consumed every day on the job by cosmetic damage and mechanical hardship. I used to know horse people who had the fanciest 3/4 and 1 ton diesels available at the time, but it takes a special sort to buy an expensive 1/2 ton that doesn’t make sense with a fifth wheel trailer. If it’s too nice to beat up by using the bed, why not tow with an Expedition or Sequoia? There are big trucks around here that have been too modified to be much good for anything but posing and perhaps playing in the desert, but I sure wouldn’t want to deal with driving one on a daily basis. Having to shop only at times when there are multiple empty spots available and fifty point parking at the office doesn’t seem like the good life to me. Hopefully there are still parts of the country that don’t have the compact-car-sized parking space disease, but this isn’t one of them. I remember seeing small spots marked as being for compact cars, but now it seems like everywhere I go only has compact spaces, and the compact car template seems to be stuck in 1985, when compacts really were small.

    • 0 avatar
      korvetkeith

      Platinum addition, extra depreciation standard!

  • avatar
    Quentin

    This truck is the styling equivalent of longcat. http://cache.ohinternet.com/images/5/5c/Longcat.jpg

    Second, they seem to have reserved using any curves in the styling for only the gauge bezels and the wheel wells. The interior is particularly at fault. The wheels and tailgate styling don’t help matters.

    Shouldn’t the title be Platinum instead of Titanium? The MSRP suggests Unobtanium would be more suitable for your typical american truck buyer.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Is that a tranny temp gauge I see, if so very nice addition. I agree the problem with the F-150 is it’s just too darn BIG in every dimension. When you need a “man step” to get into the bed or cab you know something is wrong with your product. Now as soon as someone puts the same V6 Ecoboost in a Ranger or Dakota size truck I’ll buy it. However until gas prices forces such a vehicle into the market I’m keeping my 4.7l V8 Quad Cab Dakota for my weekend boat towing duties. Its only drawback currently: 13 mpg. I don’t even mind the playskool interior as it is still in like-new condition after 9 years of Florida sun and fishing trip abuse.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      I used to use 2008 Suburbans that had the option of digitally displaying the transmission temperature. The way merely merging onto the freeway caused the number to spike was something that made me glad I didn’t own them.

  • avatar
    carguy

    This is undoubtedly a sweet truck, however, unless the big three introduce entry level diesels, I would never do it.

    The price tag also seems on the very steep side. For most folks getting a used sub $10K truck makes much more sense for the occasional heavy lifting and towing.

  • avatar
    Russell

    Shouldn’t the title read F150 Platinum instead of F150 Titanium?

  • avatar
    drylbrg

    The F150 XL that you describe would be my choice too, with the addition of four wheel drive. When it gets more expensive than that I wouldn’t want to do truck stuff with it anymore. Now, can you explain to me how you’d haul a pallet of cement in a Touareg?

  • avatar
    gslippy

    This is a truck for a man with either something to say, or something to do. All that bling is definitely not for the weekend warrior.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Why is a sub-7 second 0-60 required? I don’t own a truck, nor do I have any use for one – be it ego-support, hauling capacity, or any other possible justification – so I may be out in left field, but I’m honestly confused why you need this.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    I’d LOVE to know what the profit margin on a loaded luxo-truck actually is, considering it is just tinsel on the same basic truck you can buy for 1/2 the price. And I agree with everyone, these things are just too damned big to be useful now. Any bigger and Malls are going to need to have parking tugs and dudes with lighted orange wands to guide them in.

    BMW has Ford well beat on the single model price range though – the 3-series runs from $90K for a loaded M3 convertible! The bottom end of the range is always the best value.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      Much of it is tinsel.

      But the XL truck at “half the price” is also missing two more doors, three more feet of cabin, and two more driven wheels.

      The cheapest 4WD Screw stickers $35,655.

      • 0 avatar
        BunkerMan

        Plus there is usually a lot of money on the hood of the F150.
        I bought my 2011 Ecoboost XLT SCrew 4×4 with max towing package in the summer and the price was $12k off sticker before any negotiation.

    • 0 avatar
      fvfvsix

      Having negotiated for two of these (one F150, one F250 powerstroke) in the past year for friends, I can confirm the cash on the hood. $10K off is the “walking in the door price” down here. I think we ended up at $13K off the 250. Even so, profits have got to be healthy, because they are dead simple machines.

      • 0 avatar
        joek03

        BunkerMan and fvfvsix,

        I’m seriously researching purchasing the FX4 trim level that when loaded is right around 45k. I am seeing nowhere near 10-12k off before negotiation. I’m averaging $4500 off MSRP plus incentives. This is only getting me to $6500 off MSRP after negotiations. Granted incentives should improve when “truck month” comes around in FEB/MAR but I’m curious where you guys are located. I’m in Missouri.

  • avatar
    GS650G

    Does it come with platinum bumper balls?

  • avatar

    Absolutely horrid looking inside and out. The styling of the interior is especially grating. The look alone would have me at the Dodge or GMC lots picking one of their trucks instead.

  • avatar
    Higheriq

    The Platinum F-150 is for people (mainly guys) who need to make a statement and who don’t want something as “girly” as a car or SUV. It’s more about image and less about what the truck was actually designed to do. I would guess that many F-150 Platinums will never get the bed scratched and will never tow, much like the many 4WD SUVs which never leave pavement. Apparently there are still a great many people (again, mainly guys) who need to say something about their image, even in this economy.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      @Higheri1q:
      “The Platinum F-150 is for people (mainly guys) who need to make a statement and who don’t want something as “girly” as a car or SUV.”

      Someone who’s THAT insecure doesn’t need a truck, or any other four-wheeled vehicle, for that matter. He needs therapy.

  • avatar
    vbofw

    I would never EVER consider a pickup but gotta admit that interior is a little bit of awesome.

    And the view of the back seats looks like there are horizontal blinds in the back.

    • 0 avatar
      Wagen

      I think what you’re seeing that looks like blinds are the lines of conductive paint for the rear window defogger; the effect of the flash makes them stand out more than they actually do.

  • avatar

    I haven’t driven a large pickup in years. But the EB certainly has all of the buzz in this bunch. How does its performance compare to the 5.0? Doesn’t the V8 sound much nicer?

    Time will tell whether the EcoBoost is good for 200k miles. The V8 certainly should be. In terms of overall reliability, the 2009 and 2011 have been about average, while the 2010 has been better than average, based on responses to our Car Reliability Survey:

    http://truedelta.com/results-dispatcher.php?results_page=1&brand_1=Ford&model_1=87&brand_2=&model_2=

    • 0 avatar
      BunkerMan

      The V8 sounds better in a traditional “truck” way. I have 2 friends with Rams and one with a GMC Sierra 5.3L. They have all driven my Ecoboost and are really surprised at how much more powerful and quiet it is than their respective trucks. They all mention the lack of V8 growl, though.

      On that note, however, the turbos sound pretty good to me when I’m pulling my 6,000lb travel trailer. To each his own.

      I chose the EB over the 5.0L because of the extra towing capacity. I don’t need 11,000+ lbs, but the more it can handle, the easier it is to tow the trailer I do have.

    • 0 avatar
      V1650

      I looked at the Ecoboost when buying an F-150 recently. The economy and towing capacity increases vis-a-vis Ford’s conventional V-8’s are intriguing, but I questioned whether we’d be replacing the turbo at 80k miles given the hard use and neglect our company’s work trucks tend to receive.

      I’m a narrow-minded dinosaur, so I opted for the 5.0L V8. For what it’s worth, the 5.0L pulls strongly when you cane it, and it sounds good while doing so. Mileage has been pretty good, too; certainly better than our six year old Silverados,if not quite in the same league as the Ecoboost.

    • 0 avatar
      DUCKRACER

      I have a 2012 Platinum F-150 as mentioned above.

      The sound of the my 5.0 is intoxicating. Under an overpass, I roll down the windows and give it full throttle. It is hard to believe it is stock. I do not plan to install aftermarket exhaust. It is quiet around town and when you roll on the throttle you get a subdued growl and forwad thrust. The mileage is what the EPA said it would get. I love this truck.

  • avatar
    tparkit

    If you’ve got deep pockets, and you (and/or you wife) really need to scratch the itch to impress others, go for it. You won’t be happy otherwise.

    If that ain’t so, get yourself a second-hand 4×4 with a long bed, not this $x$ shortbed posermobile.

  • avatar
    duffman13

    I lived in south Texas for most of 2007 and part of 2008. Down there, the King Ranch F-150s outnumbered all the German sheetmetal from what I observed. These things are the rich rancher’s luxo-barge and barely ever see work duty.

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    came very close to picking one up in that same sexy bronze in XLT trim, however as usual i will probably instead pick it up 15 years from now for less than $3000.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Instead of the Platinum, I would go for the King Ranch. It is much more unique to ford, as GM, Dodge, and Toyota all have “Premium Versions”. The King Ranch is different from other brands and has awesome leather.

  • avatar
    BlisterInTheSun

    I am two months and 2,000 miles into a 2011 F-150 XLT with the Ecoboost option; honestly I wouldn’t have looked twice at this engine but the balance of the truck had exactly the options I wanted so I took the plunge.

    I love this powertrain.

    The truck flies, it’s quiet (a plus in my book) and when I nurse the gas pedal I seem to top out at 18-19 mpg (not sure where Ford gets 22 mpg, but I am not seeing it, likely a function of the cold weather driving I have been doing, I suppose.)

    This truck has the power of a diesel on 87 octane. I am very pleased so far.

  • avatar
    V1650

    I just recently purchased a 2011 F-150 4×4 with the “Super Cab” crew cab for the business I work for. A terminal driveline failure in one of our fleet of high-mileage, 5yo Chevy Silverados meant that we needed a replacement vehicle for trips to oil wells and drilling locations. It’s a work truck and while I didn’t get a “stripper” with vinyl seats and rubber mats, I didn’t opt for the “Platinum” or “King Ranch” editions, either. With a 5.0L V8, the trailer max towing package, a standard bed, and a handful of other options (satellite radio is essential when you’re out in the sticks), we paid just $34,000 including taxes and fees. The dealer even threw in the bedliner and toolbox. So it’s certainly possible to get a well-equipped F-150 for about half the price of the “windshield cowboy” edition reviewed here.

    We’ve only had it for a couple of months, but it’s made the journeys from Denver to Williston and Denver to Green River and back several times already. Both my coworkers and I have found it to be a very practical and comfortable vehicle. Mileage has been good; about 15-16 in town, and 20 plus on the highway. It rides comfortably – for a truck – and the cabin is well-appointed and admirably quiet on the road. While it is a “full-size” truck, it doesn’t appear to me to be appreciably larger than most of the full-size pickups I’ve seen on the roads around Denver (truck and SUV capital of North America) for the last two decades or so. It’s never going to handle or feel like a Mini, but for some reason it does not seem as bulky and cumbersome as our older Silverados. It rides well on unpaved roads and two-tracks, and handles off-road duties without any trouble. The F-150’s also been quite handy in the snow; even in 2WD it gets good traction in deep snow and ice, although I suspect that this is probably due to the improved weight distribution associated with the combination of a crew cab, a short bed, and a standard wheelbase. Parking it does require some care, but cabin visibility is generally good -except for the proliferation of headrests that conspire to obstruct your view when backing out of a parking space – and it’s not so large as to trigger an attack of acute paranoia when negotiating city traffic. Obviously, the longer-bed, LWB versions are probably a different story.

    Overall, we like it a lot, and the pricing was – in our view – quite reasonable. Obviously, you can always spend quite a bit more if you wish (or if you’re foolish enough to do so): the dealer we purchased ours from has a blinged-out, jacked-up King Ranch edition on it’s showroom floor with a $65,800 sticker price. But even in the “base” version, the F-150 is “well-equipped”, and the interior materials are good looking and sturdy, and not at all low rent (if obviously 100% plastic). It’s a nice, practical, efficient truck that goes about its business without any fuss or any of the fripperies found in its “upscale” breathren. When the rest of our much-abused Silverados start crapping out, we’ll probably buy several more. If I had the money, I’d seriously consider buying one for myself.

    • 0 avatar
      johnhowington

      without much details, a supercab with a v8 XLT can be had down here in texas for around $22k, and a crew cab v8 for around $25k. I hope you didnt pay $34k for a super cab.

      • 0 avatar
        hendo337

        I bought my 2011 F150 XL Scab 4×4(with dash switch) 5.0 3.55LSD,Ox White, Grey vinyl interior(of excellent texture, seat shape) w/ Black rbber floors, XL work disc. package- Chrome bumpers, cruise, CD/mp3 input,power windows(all 4), mirrors, door locks, keyless entry, tow package-select shift, tranny cooler, class IV hitch w/wiring, TBC, Fog lights, skid plates and BFG “all terrain” optional tires E load rated. The MSRP of the truck was just under $35K I got it in Garland, TX for $24K could have gotten it for $22K if I had a late model trade and financed with Ford. I could have gotten and had considered a Lariat Screw 4×4 truck even one with the 6.2L in Rockwall, TX for $38K. I bought this truck instead because I decided it was all the truck I could ever need and none of the extra crap I didn’t. I used the lower cost to justify the trade I did earlier in the year of my 2010 Mustang GT deluxe for and ’11 GT premuim comfort pack, 19″ wheel package w/strut tower brack and sport advance trac setting, shaker 1000. The truck has been EXCELLENT I have really used it hard, due to it’s lower price I have felt uch less compelled to baby it. I have towed 6000# trailer/vehicle combos on a few long trips and even towing at 80-85 mph or running in hilly terrain and givin it the stick on the on ramps or passing it managed 11.5mpg on 93oct and 70psi in the tires. I have taken it on trails that are meant for ATVs, climbed steep washed out “mounds”, through deep sand, moderate mud, I have forded water up the the door sills and it has performed flawlessly. If I set the cruise at 60mph it will sit on 24mpg at 75-80 about 20mpg. I am none too gentle in town in my daily driving and it still never dips below 14-15mpg and will generally hover in the 17-19mpg range with more freeway driving. I have had it since Oct 2 2011 and it has just under 10000miles as of apr. 25 ’11. From all I have read most Ecoboost buyers are NOT getting the mileage I get. I may not be as quick as they are but I have recorded 0-60 runs on my youtube channel hendo337 showing 0-60 in close to 6s flat how much more do I need? The only 1/2 ton truck I have encountered that was quicker was an SVT lightning. I am not exactly proud of Ford for all the Ecoboost hype at the expense of the 5.0…it seems like the only reason the 5.0 is less powerful or gets worse economy is because ford vandalized it by de-tuning it to make the EB look better. If more of the Mustang specifications were left in it there would be no question and the EB would be considered a waste of time. I guess to each their own, if having an EB makes you feel good that’s great…I don’t see any point paying more for a truck that doesn’t sound cool, has almost identical performance and could very well end up being a nightmare in a few years from a maintenance cost point of view. That’s my story and opinions.

    • 0 avatar
      naturerancher

      V1650,

      Yours is the best and most relevant truck-related comment I have read on this page, or any other for that matter.

      Thanks for posting useful information based on first-hand experience.

    • 0 avatar
      DUCKRACER

      Hi V1650

      I’m glad you like your F-150. I am also glad to see that you walked by the jacked up aftermarket kit. With the stock Ford 4×4 option, you will be able to handle 99% of off-road obstacles.

      Since you appear to be buying several, you should be able to get an excellent price on a PLATINUM. Ignore what the non-Platinum owners are saying. The interior is as luxurious as can be. Heated AND cooled front seats. Butter soft leather. Sound resistant windshield. It comes standard with self deploying running boards which, at first I thought was a little bit sissy, but then I realised that it 1) gave more ground clearance and 2)made entrance into the cab much easier. Your boss will thank you.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    This truck is God’s way of telling you that you have way too much money.

  • avatar
    Twitter: phauser

    I drive a company 2011 F-150 4×4 for work, but live in the city. I agree wholeheartedly about the size issue. This thing is a beast to park, especially since my personal vehicle is a Vibe. It makes my Pontoyota appliance a joy to drive on my days off.

    The low-end leather seats are stiff and fairly uncomfortable compared to the cloth (the platinum edition looks much softer). The ride is much smoother and more car-like with less body roll than the Silverado.

  • avatar
    poltergeist

    That front end makes current Acuras look downright beautiful.

    The perfect truck for those with a small weewee.

  • avatar
    Nick

    I hate these tarted up pick up trucks. If you need a pick up, I mean REALLY need one, you wouldn’t want all the damn frills. Conversely, if the frills appeal to you, you don’t need a pickup.

    In short, Toronto douchebags who could tell a horse from a cow will be snapping these up.

  • avatar
    Russell

    Personally, I drive a 2011 5.0 F150 supercrew because to me it’s the most convenient vehicle on the road. Plenty of room for me and my family inside and we aren’t squeezed in. I can pick up whatever I need, whenever i need it, and haul it wherever I want to go. Not to mention it’s safe, I can see over cars in front of me, and it gets fantastic fuel mileage. It’s very refined as well! If you don’t like it you don’t have to buy it! I’m on my 6th one! I’m sure small cars are nice as well, but I just dont “get” them.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      Due to an injury, I had to switch from my Ram 1500 4×4 to a car, I couldn’t take the risk of falling while getting into it. Almost 5 years later, I’m better, but not enough to go back to a 4X4 truck again, it’s just too much work getting into one of them (I test myself at the dealer while I get my oil changed). But I miss it. The mileage sucked, the parking was a hassle, but it’s comfort and ability to go just about anywhere at anytime made it so useful. I see my Ram almost every day, and even though I love my Challenger, I still miss the trucks I’ve had.

    • 0 avatar
      BigDuke6

      “and it gets fantastic fuel mileage.”
      Ummm….compared to what?…an M4 Sherman tank?

    • 0 avatar
      DUCKRACER

      I agree 100%

  • avatar
    joek03

    I agree that the “Platinum” trim level for trucks (of all makes) is over the top. However this can be said about many of the vehicles I see discussed here. I don’t understand the disdain shown for guys that drive around in “trucks they don’t REALLY NEED”.

    Vehicles are all about freedom, and a truck like this gives you that. It lets you cart around five adults comfortably on a long road trip with all your gear. You could pull your friends rich dad’s 9k lb boat down to the river. Maybe throw 2k lbs of grain seed in the back.

    If you compare a more modest trim with CUVs/SUVs in the same level of trim, for a couple grand more you are getting an incredibly capable vehicle with as much or more legroom in the back seat that can do far more. You pay a gas mileage penalty for this freedom, but I’ll spring for $500 in fuel costs annually compared to V6 Explorer for that freedom.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    I prefer the styling of the previous gen F-150, especially the Limited in pearl white. A guy I worked with had one and while the interior wasn’t as good as the newer one, it was still pretty good.

    If I could have the EcoBoost in the last gen F-150 Limited, that would be the truck to have for me.

  • avatar
    Dimwit

    Alex, what is the driving like with the auto and the 5.0. The 6 speed still has a tendency to hunt with the 5.4. You end up burying the gas to get it to go away. The 5.4 feels gutless until it, OMG! doesn’t, which is just great for mileage. :(

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      The 6-speed is tuned for economy so it can be reluctant to shift, blame CAFE on that. However once it does shift the MPGs are not hit as badly as with the 5.4. I don’t find it much worse than the programming on the Dodge or Chevy pickups.

      • 0 avatar
        DUCKRACER

        Hello Alex.
        I have a 2012 Platinum 5.0 4×4 F-150. I drive it like it is a Mustang. The transmission has a manual “M” mode and there is a tiny paddle shifter on the shift lefer. You can push that and choose any gear you want, up or down and man, you can accelerate!! It will rev happily to the moon and you can just shift up when you dare. Just remmeber, when you lift off the pedal it will be like you are “in gear” so plan your downshifts wisely.
        None of the above helps mileage, of course, but if you cruise in “D” at 65mph for about 10-20 miles your over all mpg will recover somewhat. You see, you can beat the EPA. TRY THIS FIRST ON AN UNCROWDED ROAD!!!. Once you get the nack you will swear it sounds like you are in the middle of a Nascar Cup race…and are winning!

  • avatar
    troyohchatter

    If I got one, it would have the EB. As far as the reliability concerns, maintain it and the engine and associated components will outlast the truck.

    http://www.ford.com/new/f-150-torture-test/?searchid=61287426|2211287346|25939013226

    • 0 avatar
      Herm

      Ford has done an incredible amount of torture testing with the V6 ecoboost, probably the best choice for the weekend warrior.. but if you do a lot of long distance heavy towing you may get better mpg with one of the V8s.. I’m not sure so check the truck forums for actual towing results.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      A friend of mine recently went from a 5.4 powered F150 to an Ecoboost F150 and the long term reliability is his only real concern. So far, the truck itself been perfect, and except for a tiny bit of launch turbo lag, the Ecoboost motor is a perfect replacement for the 5.4. I drove it and I could definitely live with it. No way to tell if it will hold up OK or not. Even though the car companies torture test engines, etc, it’s amazing how in real life people find ways to kill them early on.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    Trucks have inline sixes and solid front axles dammit!!!

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    Alex,

    Is there actually any platinum on this truck, anywhere? At best, I’m thinking there might be trace amounts in some obscure sensor somewhere. For such a manly vehicle, it’s ironic to attach a name that evokes thoughts of fine jewelry.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    The problems I’m having with this truck are at 52 grand I would be terrified to take this thing out for anything other than a weekend cruise. Using it as a truck would ding, scratch and bruise this thing into sever depreciation in a hurry. The gaudy painted silver overkill dash certainly doesn’t look premium, the all new smaller 5.0 liter V8 makes decent power but it’s mileage is barely better than Dodge’s Hemi 5.7 and slightly worse than Chevy’s 5.3. And that front end it positively over done. Other than that I like the F-150’s best of the big 3 trucks. Heck a 3.7 liter 302 HP V6 reg cab would be plenty fine for me and it gets 23 MPG highway.

    • 0 avatar
      DUCKRACER

      I think you would feel much more comfortable driving an XLT or Lariat at the most. Get the 5.0 It sounds great, has plenty of power and the MPG is comprable to most full size pickups.

  • avatar
    Bimmer

    Even Platinum does not have a standard bed-liner!?

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      Nope. While I disliked this as well, my pickup loving friends thought a standard bedliner was a terrible idea since they all have their own ideas about what the “best bedliner” is, so perhaps it is appropriate for the market.

  • avatar
    DUCKRACER

    The problem with bedliners is that they wear the paint off the bed and invite rust. I always have used a spray-on bedliner called Line-X but I am sure any spray-on or owner painted-on bedliner would be better.


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