By on January 8, 2012

Some of the commenters took me to task for what seemed to be undue praise for the 2013 Ford Fusion. So, without prejudice, here is the 2013 Ford Fusion and Ford Fusion Energi.

The 2013 Fusion will be based on the same platform that underpins the Ford Mondeo. Three powertrains will be offered; a 2.5L four-cylinder utilized on other Ford products, making 170 horsepower and 170 lb-ft of torque mated to a 6-speed automatic, and two Ecoboost options. A 1.6L Ecoboost will make 179 horsepower and 172 lb-ft and will be the sole configuration available with a 6-speed manual transmission. Fuel economy for the 1.6L is said to be 26/37 mpg city/highway. A 2.0L Ecoboost will put out 237 horsepower and 250 lb-ft of torque, but will have an all-wheel drive option. A 6-speed automatic is the sole transmission.

The Fusion Hybrid returns with 47/44 mpg city/highway figures being reported. The Atkinson cycle engine is downsized from 2.5L to 2.0L, making 185 horsepower and 130 lb-ft of torque but transmission details weren’t available at this time. A lane departure warning system, SYNC, active park assist, blind spot monitoring system and MyFord Touch will be available.

A plug-in Fusion, dubbed the Fusion Energi, will be available. Ford didn’t disclose battery pack size, charge times or official range figures (although it is estimated to be 500 miles) but the car is said to get 100MPGe.

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67 Comments on “NAIAS Preview: 2013 Ford Fusion Official Shots And Specs...”


  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Seriously, this is a game changer?

    It’s no 1971 Jaguar E-Type Speedster by exterior impact. It’s more 1990ish Merkur Scorpio:

    http://fordsierranet.com.ar/Fotos/merkur_6.jpg

    http://memimage.cardomain.com/ride_images/1/1850/4901/4624950006_large.jpg

    And wow, 179 hp with the ecoboost, or a choice of the same 2.5 liter now offered in the Fusion of today? That’s not so game changing.

    I guess I’ll have to wait to see how it drives/rides, examine the build quality with my own eyes and ears, and measure the reliability through what I consider credible sources before I plunk down my MSRP deposit, based on the word on the street that this “blows all competitors out of the water,” after all.

    • 0 avatar

      Please do that.

      -Sent from my 2012 Ford Mustang Boss 302 Long Term Tester via MyFord Touch

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Is that the one that will lap an M3 around the Nürburgring?

        ;)

        I realize this is not in the same category as the Scorpio/Fusion (as the Fusion is a sedan, while the Toyota FT86 a coupe), but the Toyota FT86 is something closer, in contemporary terms, of what I’d call a vehicle that is worthy of stylistic praise:

        http://images.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/11/Toyota-86-Lauch_Fuji-Racetrack_22.jpg

      • 0 avatar
        SV

        The FT-86 has some nice touches and good basic proportions, but from a design perspective it’s a mess.

        I could go into detail as to why, but this article sums up my feelings nicely:

        http://cdnlive.cardesignnews.com/tokyo/index.php/2011/toyota-gt-86subaru-brz-so-near-yet-so-so-far/

        The Fusion is much better resolved, although it’s not even close to being the same type of car.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        SV – Going back to Derek’s original “game changer,” pre-release article on this new Fusion (and Ford’s issues with Lincoln siblings), I can honestly say that I like the looks of the Lincoln MKZ better than this new Fusion.

        If someone told me that Ford was trying for a literal retro riff off the Scorpio, I’d believe them.

        The FT-86 is gorgeous, IMO, with the singular exception of the jaunty angles on each side of the front fascia.

        Finally, I will be shocked if there’s NOT less rear headroom in this new Fusion than the current one, and again, this is not Ford specific, but WHY are almost all car makers going down this idiotic road? Sedans have four doors, meaning that most people buying them probably intend to have people, sometimes adults or tall teens, in the rear seats, so why sacrifice so much rear head room in the interest of trying to get some swoop that may or may not pay honors to the car’s aesthetic exterior looks? If I value style over functionality to such a large degree, I’ll buy a coupe.

      • 0 avatar

        Speaking of hype is there any car more hyped, perhaps nauseatingly so, than the FT86? After years of slow reveals I simply stopped caring about the car.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        I can’t speak to your subjective feelings on the FT-86, just as you can’t speak to mine on the new Fusion (and I’ve yet to drive either, obviously), but many, including some TTAC editors, thought it was a worthy enough development to do quite an elaborate series on it.

        This is just my personal take, but I think the honest to goodness RWD platform, value pricing & high levels of aftermarket ‘tuneability’ (I do not know if that’s actually a word), encapsulated in what many argue is an attractive body style, was noteworthy, especially given that Toyota had completely abandoned that niche market for so long.

      • 0 avatar

        Official pricing hasn’t been announced yet. How do you know it will be have “value pricing”? Are you shilling for Toyota ;)

    • 0 avatar
      Wheeljack

      I’ll take the Scorpio instead. It was one of the most awarded cars in history at the the time of it’s introduction (and for many years after) and it drives the proper set (rear) of wheels.

      If you’ve ever driven a Scorpio (I own one), you understand how good this car was dynamically both then and now. I can’t wait until spring comes and it’s time to awaken it from its winter hibernation.

    • 0 avatar
      ohiodale

      The game changer is the same HP as the 2.5L but achieving 37 mpg. Good luck on finding a credible source for reliability. If you find one please let me know. I do not trust any source who bases their findings on less than 100 reviews using a random cross section of americans. For example, Consumer Reports (CR) uses only people who subscribe to CR. People who subscribe to CR are not typical americans and are most likely biased since they tend to believe stats, even if the stats are not scientific as the case with CR. Random phone surveys are the only way to get a good accurate picture.

  • avatar
    ozibuns

    After all the hype, the styling from certain angles (profile especially) is more ho-hum than home run. Side on it reminds me of the current European Mondeo. Probably colour-sensitive. Interior is an evolution of the typical MyFord Touch layout. Hope economy and refinement are stunning if this car hopes to be a game changer.

    • 0 avatar
      SV

      The posted pic is probably the most unflattering one there is. From all the other angles, IMO of course, it looks quite good. The other profile shots (of the non-hybrid models, I’m assuming) look better too.

      • 0 avatar
        ozibuns

        Agree, It looks pretty stunning in white and red.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        I agree that the posted pic is the most unflattering in terms of paint color (and this is more subjective, but those wheels are not complimentary, either), but it’s also the most realistic one, rather than the (expected as industry norm) dramatic angles where the profile was captured as if a photographer was laying on his/her belly or dangling from 10′ high scaffolding.

    • 0 avatar
      PJ McCombs

      From the A-pillars forward, I think it’s quite stunning, like a puffed-up Rapide. I suspect the rest of it would be prettier with a lower beltline. Another case of high flanks making big wheels look just adequate, and base wheels tiny.

      No V6 (which I quite liked on the last Fusion)? And are those touch-sensitive radio/HVAC controls on the console? Cool-looking, but would think tricky to operate by feel while driving.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        You’re right about the touch controls. CR didn’t have anything nice to say about them–they are too easily hit accidentally and are virtually useless if you wear gloves. They also provide no tactile feedback.

        I remember using those type of controls on some old walkmen. There’s a reason that style didn’t catch on.

    • 0 avatar
      Trend-Shifter

      I agree that the fusion is heavily influenced by the Mondeo, especially the trunk lines.
      But that’s a good thing, I like the look of the Mondeo. I see them in China.

      The new fusion is definitely different than a Camry or Accord. It does have an upscale look.
      The price point will determine it’s susccess. The Fusion could mirror the latest VW pricing strategy in the USA.
      If Ford gets greedy it will flop. If they price it competitively it will be a success.

  • avatar
    acuraandy

    The insolence of Detroit has yet to amaze me.

    ’13 Dart (the ONLY ‘big-three’ -even though it’s really a Fiat-offering i’d even remotely consider), 2.0l NA 160hp. 2.4 MultiAir Turbo (and associated insurance rate increase) 160hp (but ‘more’ torque). I’ll take a base model/base engine 6spd MT thanks.

    ’13 Mondeo/Fusion 2.5l NA 170hp. 1.6l EcoBoost a scant 9 hp increase, and only 2 lbs torque (and i’m sure a shitload of turbo-lag).

    Spare me the BS about Turbos providing more torque (even five years ago this was an oxymoron). The insurance premiums alone would negate any power benefits not easily enabled by simply changing out to a reputable cold-air intake setup and upgraded exhaust for a few hundred bucks.

    Keep trying, big-three. Even I’M pulling for you, but ya’ll need to do better!

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    I like the looks, and especially like the exhaust tips integrated into the rear bumper on the red car.

    I’m a bit disappointed that the most powerful engine is only 237/250, but I’m sure the torque curve will make it feel more powerful than the current 240hp 3.0 V6, and I’d bet money on their being a Sport/ST/SHO version in a year or two that takes that figure up closer to 300hp.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      But will it outsell the Camry?

      Seems to me the name of the game is to outsell the Camry, and I am not optimistic that this iteration of the Fusion will do that.

      Maybe giving buyers more value for the money by reducing the number of trim levels to “more than a Camry LE” and “more than a Camry XLE V6″ would do the trick. After all, this is Ford’s bread-and-butter sedan. The real Ford money-maker remains the F-150 in all its iterations.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        I’m not sure if outselling the Camry is the goal. Making a profit surely is, and probably increasing market share as well, and while I’m sure Ford benchmarks new vehicles against competitors, I don’t know if sales goals are based on ‘let’s beat Toyota’ as much as ‘let’s make more with this one, or sell more of this one, than we did the last one’.

        The Camry is entrenched now, but it took a few generations of Toyota sedans that were objectively better than what Detroit was offering before it took the sales crown. Now that Detroit is offering things better than Toyota, it might take a while for things to swing the other way.

        On the plus side, this looks classier than the Sonata/Optima, and the interior looks much more well put together from these shots. Heading off the buyers at the pass who were going Korean because of the style of those cars seems like a smart move.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        If Ford’s strategy on the Fusion matchs the Focus, I don’t see them playing the ‘value’ card. I would expect them to play the premium card with high-margin features and demand a higher sell price.

  • avatar
    Advance_92

    I’ll be interested to see it in Chicago next month, but it looks like seventeen inch wheels are lost under that car.

  • avatar
    potatobreath

    Goodbye, handbrake.

    • 0 avatar
      OldandSlow

      That omission is a deal breaker for me. Even with an automatic, I like to wait out traffic lights and drawbridges in neutral.

      Along with the poodle dog stylists in Dearborn, the lack of a handbrake is something 95% of US buyers will never miss. The venerable handbrake is essentially an European feature, where a greater number of cars are sold with manual transmissions.

      • 0 avatar
        vbofw

        …or 99.995%!

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        I’ve never thought of a connection between a hand parking brake and auto/manual. Rather, it seemed more correlated to where the gearshift was located: on the tree = foot parking brake; on the floor = hand parking brake.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        Even with an automatic, I like to wait out traffic lights and drawbridges in neutral.

        Why not put it in park? That extra inch of gear lever travel leave you winded?

      • 0 avatar
        potatobreath

        I usually shift into neutral and keep my foot on the brake. I sometimes experiment with the handbrake while in neutral, but I am not sure about the attentiveness of the driver behind me. There is a chance I might get driven into at low speed if my brake lights go off, and the driver behind takes it as a cue to accelerate.

        I would rather have a handbrake than side by side cup holders though. The handbrake’s convenient for steep hill starts. What’s wrong with having in-line cup holders? Do the new cars all have hill start assist?

  • avatar
    redliner

    Wow. I really like the styling. The raised points above the tail lights and the Aston Martin-ish grill combined with sporty wheels looks so much more youthful than the new Camry. This car will look sporty 10 years from now with its understated good looks.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I miss Ed.

    I HATE the front clip, it is sort of Chryslerish, but I’ll forgive Ford as the pedestrian safety standards are taking any joy out of the front clip of almost – everything. The rear haunches looks Hyundai/Hondaish. Three panel shot showing from the rear the car is very nice looking. I like the interior, but don’t see anything “ground breaking,” here.

    For the record, I’m a HUGE Ford Fusion fan, it is my “go to” rental.

  • avatar

    Me too, but bear with me while I learn the ropes. Ed wouldn’t have asked me to do the job if he didn’t have faith in my abilities.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    Another look alike, “Whale Shark” front end. I really am tired of it, and I don’t even understand the reasoning behind the pedestrian safety standards. What knucklehead thought them up? Even worse, what knucklehead approved them?

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    I don’t get it. Are a few pictures and engine specs supposed to be proof that this car is a “game changer”?

    I think the Fusion looks better than its competition, but there is a lot more to it than that. Until you can report on how it drives, claiming it is a game changer is far too much praise.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      I can understand why some don`t think “gamechanger” but when you consider a) the hybrid is near Prius levels of fuel economy in a mid-size rather than compact package and b) the plugin hybrid Energi model which is alleged to get better eMPG than the Prius plugin, Leaf and Volt. All of which are smaller cars. If the mpg figures are accurate then that could be considered a gamechanger. Also the base ecoboost engine gives better mpg than the current leader of Sonata and Optima.

      I would have loved to see a performance model, but I suppose the 2.0 ecoboost is pretty close to the new BMW 328i in power and torque. So performance should be OK. I hope a Sport/ST/SHO model comes out in due course.

  • avatar
    BobJava

    Oh cool, another bread-and-butter family car with small windows and a sloping roofline. Plenty of sporting pretense, none of the reality.

    It doesn’t look bad, but the lack of utility in modern cars is grating.

  • avatar
    tekdemon

    They really do have to cut it out with the sloping rear rooflines, this looks like the headroom in the back is going to be as terrible as the Sonata where me and my 6’2 friend had our heads banging against the liner unless we purposely scooted down uncomfortably low. I suspect people will fight to call shotgun more than ever before in coming years.
    Aside from that though I find it very interesting that the Fusion Hybrid went exactly the opposite of the Camry Hybrid in terms of powertrain this time. Toyota upsized the powertrain of the Camry Hybrid from the 2.4L to 2.5L and boosted the horsepower rating whereas Ford did the exactly opposite and dropped the engine down to a 2.0L motor. I’m guessing Toyota must have left some powertrain efficiency on the table on purpose for the sake of higher power output and I’m honestly kind of curious to see which one will sell better.

  • avatar
    Tstag

    Cheap Chinese knockoff of an Aston Martin….

    …oh wait.

  • avatar
    dwford

    This doesn’t do anything for me. Kinda disappointed in the styling. Looks like a Mazda6 with an Aston grill. The interior, thankfully, isn’t over styled like the new Escape, so that is nice, but it is almost under styled like the new VWs.

    Powertrains seem OK, except for that base 2.5. Most people are going to be rocking the 1.6T. And I wasn’t expecting a plug in hybrid version.

    I was worried that my Sonata was about to face a real game changer, but now that I have seem the new Camry, Malibu and Fusion, I can breathe easy until the Accord and Altima reveals.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Game changer is an over used word. But this does have in some eyes a more coherent and stylish exterior. It is much more fuel efficient in hybrid mode than the Sonata, offers a plug in hybrid (unlike the Sonata) and is more fuel efficient at 37mpg that 35mpg HWY for the 1.6 ecoboost. It will also likely drive better since it is based on the Mondeo. Will it sell more, who knows for sure.

  • avatar
    WriterParty.com

    More understated than I expected, and the interior doesn’t borrow the same space-alien language that the Focus and Escape do. That surprises me. Like has been said, it simply looks like an evolutionized Mondeo, but to my American self, that is indeed revolutionary. Doesn’t look like a game changer, but then again, it’s all about how the car drives. The previous Fusion was bland city and yet its driving dynamics put it at the front of the pack.

  • avatar
    colin42

    I’m hoping the wagon will make it to the US but I’m not holding my breath

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    The existing Fusion could be recognized from a distance…it has been distinct from the CamSnotCord (triplets seperated at birth?.) I liked it so much that I’ve been tempted to buy Ford for the first time in 20 years. This new Fusion loses that distinctive look. Elvis has left the showroom.

    Meh.

  • avatar
    jdmcomp

    OK, so we finally get the Mondeo styling available in Europe for the last few years, but it such an improvement over the current fubox I do love it. Now if they would just give it some hp, something like the turbo Kia Optima I just bought. And at a reasonable price, and god forbid, a 6 speed manual transmission.

  • avatar
    getacargetacheck

    Overall profile reminds me of the 5 series GT.

  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    I fail to see why this redesigned Ford Fusion is a game changer. It’ll be a competent player – but there is nothing earth moving here.

    Like Salmon returning to their spawning grounds, CamCord buyers will still flock to their perspective showrooms. The GM’ers will gravitate to the new ‘bu. Value buyers will head over to Hyundai and Kia.

    The market for family haulers in the US is boring. The lack of manual transmission options with all three engines is not a good sign.

    • 0 avatar
      vbofw

      it sounds like you think this will not gain market share in the mid class segment? Buyers will always return to their roots. I’d bet you a shiny nickel that Ford’s 2013 share is notably above 2011 share, at the expense of Camry, Malibu, and Sonata. Not Accord because they seem to be hitting new lows right now.

      For one anecdote, I’m a historic VW buyer who is considering A6, but may just wait for this guy instead. I think they’ll get the old quality VW transplants, especially because you can’t even get basic features like rear parking sensors in a loaded Passat.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    On the subject of the 1.6 liter ecoboost option, which develops 179 horsepower, does anyone else believe that it’s an odd choice for a midsize sedan, whereas it may have been less conspicuous appearing in a compact vehicle?

    Is it a european ‘thing,’ given their government incentives for smaller displacement engines there?

    Count me in as the distinct minority saddened by the lack of any manual transmission options in so many vehicles in the U.S. today. I’ve yet to experience a truly rewarding slushbox relative to its manual counterpart.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Why an odd choice? It develops similar power to the base 2.5 engine, but has more torque and is more fuel efficient. Chevy have done this with the Cruze, Ford are doing it with the Escape also.

      We used to only get two engine choices typically now that is being expanded to 3 or more – good news. If you don`t want that engine, then the choice is there to buy the base 2.5 I4.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        But why add the complexity and expense of turbocharging if the same horsepower can be made from an existing non-aspirated motor, especially since this is not exactly a lightweight car, will lack a manual transmission, and low end torque at lower revs is typically more practical than power only accessible at far higher RPM, unless there’s some other significant benefit (I don’t see a huge payoff in in mileage based on the stated MPG claims)?

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        But why add the complexity and expense of turbocharging if the same horsepower can be made from an existing non-aspirated motor

        Gas mileage is much better than the 2.5 26/37 highway isn’t impressive vs 23/33?

  • avatar
    eCurmudgeon

    Any word on curb weight?

    237 HP wouldn’t be so bad if Ford could keep the weight down to, say, 3200 lb or so, but after looking at those photos (and remembering the bloating of recent-generation Tauri), I doubt it.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    Despite my poor dealings with Ford vehicles in the past, I would be totally willing to forgive all of that if they would sell a wagon. The main reason the wife and I bought a Subaru is that very few companies make 5-door 4-cylinder wagons, and fewer still in the midsize segment.

    And, no, I don’t want a tall fuel wasting crossover.

  • avatar
    LectroByte

    The hype does seem to be thick on this one. I like the new grill over the old blingy mach-3 razor one, but I could do without the Chrysler Sebring-esque hood.

  • avatar
    360joules

    The profile makes me think of an e39 with a squished roofline. The front and rear, um, i can’t tell. I usually wait for real-life viewing for my final judgement. My mother would call it a handsome car.

  • avatar
    siuol11.2

    Slice a few inches off the shoulders and it would look fantastic.


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