By on January 6, 2012

 

 

 

In the endless race to the bottom to be first in overall sales in America, Audi will be adding more models to their U.S. lineup, hoping to increase overall volume while copying Mercedes-Benz and BMW’s strategy of creating unwanted and useless niche models to pawn off on vulgarians with adequate credit to qualify for leasing  money.

The Q3 and A3 sedan appear to be the first products making their way over, and they will surely be the darlings of sorority house parking lots across the nation. Audi will also build cars in the United States starting in 2015, though details regarding vehicles or the location of the plant weren’t announced. Automotive News has Audi boss Rupert Stadler eyeing growth over here in both the SUV and sedan markets, so it’s only a matter of time before we’re flooded with even more derivative products – hopefully the forthcoming A2 concept is as innovative and weird as its predecessor.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

42 Comments on “Audi Adding More Models To U.S. Lineup As Its Insatiable Quest For Volume Continues...”


  • avatar
    jkross22

    “The Q3 and A3 sedan appear to be the first products making their way over, and they will surely be the darlings of sorority house parking lots across the nation.”

    Harumph!

  • avatar
    replica

    Yeah, try not to do anything people want, Audi, like a small affordable diesel. Just keep sending over cars with Christmas rope lighting in the headlights.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Holy crap, that looks like a Toureag and Equinox had a baby.

    If Audi wanted to boost sales in North America here is a tip, don’t price your options so ridiculously expensive like all the other German makers do, and offer a truly equipped luxury car/SUV at a more grounded price with a bit more base content, and don’t nickel and dime the customers for things like over priced cold weather packages.

    I’m looking at you too BMW and Merc

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      I’ve always figured the expensive German car options are in place because of low flexible manufacturing efficiencies related to having like 15 variants of each series, and the cost to develop each variant. Take BMW – you have the 328/335/i/is/xi/d sedan/wagon/coupe/cabrio. Infiniti is headed in this direction with their G-line. My dad complains about the expensive, a la carte BMW menu compared to the more all-in-one Acura offerings. When he bought his TSX in 2004, the only options were nav and the automatic transmission.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    too bad they don’t divert some of that insatiable quest for volume into a quest for reliability and durability, how many older Audis do I see on the road, ZILCH!

    • 0 avatar
      johnhender

      you beat me to it as an Audi owner i think i have had my last Audi i am tired of the maint costs I wish them luck but it will more likely be without me

      • 0 avatar
        fredtal

        All German cars are expensive to maintain, but at 60,000 miles I have had few problems with my 2007 A3

      • 0 avatar
        ZekeToronto

        My 2009 A3 is nearly three years old and has about 35k in miles (60k kms). Zero unscheduled repairs, no warranty claims and regular maintenance has run me about $700. in total (including the DSG service). Couldn’t be happier and will probably go with the upcoming sedan, even though I’d prefer another hatch.

      • 0 avatar
        A is A

        “My 2009 A3 is nearly three years old and has about 35k in miles (60k kms). Zero unscheduled repairs, no warranty claims”

        I can say the same about muy Toyota Avensis: Zero repairs, unscheduled or not. Only maintenance and preventive maintenance (water pump, distribution belt, fluids…).

        The difference is that my Avensis was manufactured in 2004 and has 142k km in the odometer. It looks anf feels like a new car, in the inside and in the outside.

        The benchmark for reliability/durability is set by the Japanese, not by the Germans. Sometimes I still regret not buying an Audi A2 (such magnificent piece of design) instead of the Avensis, but taking a look at what´s happening with my sister´s 2004 VW Polo makes me feel happy again with my Toyota.

  • avatar
    Verbal

    Will these new U.S. models be equipped with over-complex, prone-to-malfunctioning electronics?

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I think it’s funny how all these automakers want to be like Chevy! What will Audi’s equivalent of the Aveo/Sonic be?

  • avatar
    spyked

    OMFG. Seriously.

    What is the point in throwing insults at car-buyers and car-makers? They are giving the U.S. MORE Euro-style choices. That is a GOOD THING.

    This site, and it’s “writers”, consume more Hater-ade than the Republican party and Fox News combined! I gave up on figuring out why that is.

    Even if VW/Audi made every.single.car on the Golf platform, they’d be better cars than 90% of the others offered here in N.A. Sheesh!

    • 0 avatar
      Tomifobia

      They’d also be providing employment for thousands of unemployed mechanics.

      • 0 avatar
        spyked

        Says you. Certainly not the millions of people that buy VW’s across the world.

        If there are any unemployed mechanics out there, it’s because the “reliable” cars are replaced or junked, not repaired, when they start having troubles. You see old VW’s on the roads for a reason. People repair them because they LOVE them.

      • 0 avatar
        Wheatridger

        But there are no unemployed VW mechanics. (rim shot, please)

        I’ve known plenty of independent VW & SAAB mechanics, nice folks all. The labor costs I paid them supported an essential, locally-owned service business so they weren’t all wasted. Other folks, who bought new cars often to spare the repairs, paid large sums to distant moneylenders like GMAC. I’d consider all that money wasted.

    • 0 avatar
      replica

      Aside from the reliability issues, which is a MAJOR selling point of a small car.

    • 0 avatar

      What is the point in throwing insults at car-buyers and car-makers?

      This site, and it’s “writers”, consume more Hater-ade than the Republican party and Fox News combined! I gave up on figuring out why that is.

      You threw insults at the writing staff here, Republicans, and the people who broadcast and watch Fox News (which gets much higher ratings, btw, than the cable news networks that tilt left).

      What is your point in your throwing insults at a significant percentage of the readers here?

      • 0 avatar
        spyked

        Who’s throwing insults? I’m simply calling out rudeness. I can’t help it. I wish I could stop. The FNS comments were just in jest….topical as it is.

        **But, really, let’s be fair, the audience and pushers of FNS and the Republicans in the news today know what they buy and sell. It ain’t LOVE, that’s for sure.**

        I’m simply saying, insulting people who buy nice cars because they don’t comply with your specific tastes is rude. Especially when you do it without spelling out what you drive so people can judge it/you. I find most car “haters” will never actually be in danger of having the option to buy the car they claim to loathe (as cars cost money and having a job that pays money usually requires a good attitude), so it’s not a thing.

        Seriously though, why be rude? I guess it works….I took the bait!

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Oh spare me. Yes, TTAC definitely can bring out the “b” word accusation from everyone. They hate GM, wait they hate Toyota, wait no no no, they hate, Acura, nope, nope, nope, they hate Audi.

      Reality check for you spyked. VW has been in the bottom of the product quality toilet, below North America’s worst offerings from Chrysler and GM, for close to two decades now. They only recently started showing some improvement.

      I think VW decided to charge so much extra for a real diesel engine because the oil consumption issues of the two-oh-slow is the stuff of legend, it practical is a diesel engine on its own. Never mind electrical problems that would make Jaguar blush with envy, and ignition coils apparently made by North Korea using old Soviet army parts. The Jetta was the mark of complete and total crap for the better part of a decade for a long list of issues; ironically the decontented simplified step backward version is very well received with everyone, except the automotive press.

      How bad is it? Well the brass at VW decided that a rebadged circling the drain we’re ready to bankrupt Chrysler minivan was the perfect solution for some badge engineering, answering a question that no one asked. What a shock, they couldn’t sell them to save their lives and ironically, Chrysler benefited by learning some of VW suspension tuning tricks; something that VW has a history of doing rather well (ye’ old bug and other pre mid-70’s products aside)

      But here is a really big hint, if you’re going to toss out accusations of Hater-ade and then defend VW, *ehem*, quality, to quote John Lennon, “you ain’t gonna make it with anyone any how.”

      • 0 avatar
        spyked

        The reality check you are offering is YOUR REALITY. Not the majority of most Americans, certainly not the rest of the world who use VW’s as family cars, delivery cars, ambulances, military vehicles, fleet cars, police cars, etc. Your perceived reality is provided for you by the “press.”

        I’m not “defending” anything….quality speaks for itself with repeat customers and healthy sales. Can quality be improved? You betcha. Then people complain about cost.

        The thing I find funny about the press and others who don’t actually BUY cars is that when the Jetta was “complicated” and reliable by anyone’s standards (MKV) they said it was too nice, too expensive, “I miss the old VW’s that were simple!” Now that the Jetta is cheap and simple, just a box, and still reliable, the same people say it’s no better than a Chevy Cobalt.

        That is nothing but anti-VW bias. Why are “organizations” and “writers” so averse to just telling us your angle, right up front?

        And yes, the Chrysler minivan disguised as VW is bad. But really, who can blame VW for giving American minivan buyers what they think we wanted? They sold a truly unique minivan here for years, the VR6 Eurovan. To about 35 people :(

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        No, those folks at JD Power and Consumer Reports don’t know what the heck they are talking about – do they. And they base their reliability scores on…oh ya, the owners who report the problems they have.

        All further complaints can be submitted to JD Power and Consumer Union; I’m sure if you have keen insight to why they are wrong with data to back up your claims, they will gladly put you on the payroll.

  • avatar
    frizzlefry

    I am still curious as to why they sell the FWD A3 2.0T. I myself own a 2009 3.2 Quattro A3 with the magnetic suspension. It is an awesome car, fast as hell, handles great. It was in for maintenance and some ECU upgrades but the dealership was backlogged so they gave me a 2012 2.0T FWD A3 loaner and I was not a fan. It was zippy, sure, and the interior was nice. The big downer for me was the 2.0T engine and no Quattro. I test drove that engine before in a TT (before I bought the 3.2 A3) and I was impressed. But going from the 3.2 to the 2.0T was a bummer. I remember reviews saying that “you need not buy the expensive 3.2 A3, the 2.0T is just as good”. They lied. Without a sport suspension, quattro and the 3.2 engine I would not buy an A3, I would get a GTI.

    • 0 avatar
      spyked

      I’d probably get the 2.0T in the A3. The lower tuned VW version of the 2.0T in my VW CC “feels” fast and gets ridiculously good mileage for such a huge car. I think the 3.2 just spoiled four cylinders for you. Totally different machines.

      Of course there would be those that say the FWD A3 2.0T, being lighter, less nose-heavy, and without the fake-Quattro system, is the performance version of the A3 to your luxury V6 version.

      I’d love a base TT, personally, and I might still treat myself.

      • 0 avatar
        frizzlefry

        There is likely a lot of truth to the 3.2 spoiling me :) And I did like the TT, maybe I still would. It is a sport tuned car after all. But in the FWD A3 version the front tires squealed every now and then once the turbos kicked in, quattro with the 3.2 never does even if I use launch control. I can see the 3.2 with FWD sounding like you have two pigs for front tires, which is likely why the 3.2 model came with AWD. I owned a 2.7T A6 before the 3.2 A3 and I find the A3’s Haldex AWD system works great. Its not re-active, its pro-active so it reads throttle input/steering/braking input and can transfer up to 100% of the torque to the rear wheels so the fact that it’s base split is 90 front 10 in back does not really factor in. Plus it’s a lot lighter than the Torsen system the other Audi models use which is why Audi put it in the A3 and TT. So if I launch my 3.2, 100% of the torque hits the rear so it launches like a RWD car, steering wheel never veers in a direction like it did when I floored the FWD loaner. Same is true in twisties. When pushed the Haldex feels like a RWD car. Only difference I have noticed between the Torsen and Haldex systems is in the snow. Hard to kick out the rear end on the Haldex while the torsen was much easier to take “rally style” sliding turns with.
        EDIT: In summery, the 2.0T FWD A3 is no where near as maniacal as my 3.2 quattro. I drove the 2.0T A3 in DSG sport mode most of the time so it felt somewhat responsive by keeping the turbo spooled. Sport mode in the 3.2 turns the car into an outright monster.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Didn’t Audi go with a Haldex in the A3 because they were committed to a transverse mounted engine?

        I’ve always found the nicest thing about the standard Quattro torsen drivelines, and their Land Cruiser/4runner/FJ brethren; as well as the Subie viscous couplings; are their utter predictability compared to the electronically controlled clutch pack wonders everyone else seem to favor. But that’s probably less of an issue now that electronics have gotten so good, as displayed by SH-AWD and rally style EVO type awd systems.

    • 0 avatar
      Kevin Jaeger

      I agree. My wife test drove an A3 S-line and really liked it.

      But we ended up buying a GTI. There’s quite the overlap between those two cars at the moment.

    • 0 avatar
      Robbie

      @frizzlefry: the comparison may not be fair – the 3.2 plus magnetic suspension was, if I remember correctly, more than $10K extra, right?

      • 0 avatar
        frizzlefry

        @robbie: sure was. 57 grand (canadian) brand new. Hence I bought it with 30,000km on the ODO, warrenty ’till 2015 and 20 grand less. :) But the point I was initally trying to make was that if I were looking at a FWD A3 2.0T I would get a GTI. The only A3 audi should really sell is a quattro version. The 3.2 A3 with mag suspension was the A3 to get IMO but was short lived due to it’s cost. Partly because Audi went all out with the options. In fact I think the 2009 3.2 A3 is the only car aside from the R8 to have that magnetic suspention but I may be wrong. I’m just waiting for Audi to start putting the turbo 2.5 litre thats in the TT-RS into an A3. I’d buy that. Used.

      • 0 avatar
        Robbie

        The only minuses for the GTI in comparison to the A3 seem to be (1) exterior (2) the lack of leather – instead, you have to be ok with the funny looking cloth seats.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    Audi A6 Engine options: UK 3, US 2. Wheel choices: UK 9, US 4. Seat options: UK 3, US 1. Leather/trim choices: UK 14 + Audi exclusive options, US 4.

    Extended leather package, seat massage, air suspension, QuattroSport rear diff, all not available in the US. Why don’t they start with THIS instead of bringing over tiny cars that won’t sell outside of major cities? Our “prestige” level cars have about half the options that UK buyers can get.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Just like the Audi sedans are the same sausage of different lengths, the Q3 is a Q5 photocopied at 70%, while the Q5 is a Q7 photocopied at 70%.

    I’m hoping they’ll bring over the A1 too. It’s one fine lookin’ lil’ runabout…

    /Looks over 500 and Mini Cooper Sales
    //Hangs head

    • 0 avatar
      frizzlefry

      The same sausage at different lengths is really just a side-effect of Audi attempting to maintain their brand identity. I will say this, photocopied they may be but they will still look good in 6 years. Most cars with major design flair have a visual shelf life of 3 years. Lookin at you juke. One exception to that would be the Infiniti FX but most cars that you look at and go “Hey, look its a ____! Looks cool!” are cars you don’t want to look at by the final production run.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    A4 can probably do everything and more the Q3 can. With the back seats up there is no cargo space, but in the A4 you get a nice trunk.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    VW group not only wants to become the biggest brand in the world, but also the badge engineering champs as well.

  • avatar
    V572625694

    They probably won’t move too many units in the color shown in that picture. Do they call it “mustard-copper”?

  • avatar
    JMII

    Its easy to add models and thus sales in the US. 1) Take any current vehicle, 2) Raise ride height and enlarge grill, 3) Add 20″ rims, 4) Add Facebook integration via some overcomplicated touch screen panel, throw in fake aluminum trim while your at it, 5) Double the price of vehicle from Step #1… 6) DONE!

  • avatar
    gearspuppy

    Looks like photoshopped Audi circles on an FX35. I guess that’s what people want.

  • avatar
    AMC_CJ

    So what’s the difference between this and the Tiguan….. about $20k?

  • avatar
    Joss

    The Ring was a Wagnerian money pit. Audi’s got four of them. Audi has circled back in vogue to be discovered again as the foundering parts pit of the past.

    So we stopped our Panzers for 24 hours before rolling to the finish at Dunkirk. Time needed to facilitate repairs and overhauls to our highly engineered fleet. A fatal mistake that went against the wishes of the leader. For in the interim the allies made swift across the channel.

  • avatar
    kurtamaxxguy

    All Audi’s doing wrt the Q3 is bringing one over for USA’ers to see. They have not decided whether or not they’ll actually import it.

    As for A3 Sedan, Audi’s following a tired USA mantra. Seems that for autos, looks trump practicality every time.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States