By on November 30, 2011

If there’s a word to describe VW’s future plans in the US, it’s “big.” There is still no specific plan to bring subcompact Polos to the US, and likely only an EV version of the new Up! city car. Even Audi is shying away from bringing more small products to the US, nixing the A1 and only supporting exports of the A2 in EV form. And according to Automotive News [sub] the next big thing for VW’s US portfolio could be a midsized CUV, built at its new Chattanooga plant and slotting between the Tiguan and Touareg. But this concept is not that CUV. According to VW, this CrossCoupe Concept is an exploration of alternative bodystyles for the compact CUV platform, more akin to a Range Rover Evoque than a mass market model… think “Tiguan CC” and you’ll be getting the idea. So, will it be built? VW sources tell Automotive News [sub] that

We won’t rule out the possibility of adding a sportier SUV to the Volkswagen lineup at some time. But the main message with the Cross Coupe is its styling, which stands for the future of SUV design at Volkswagen

You can see the evolution of VW’s new three-slat grille, further integrating the new cue into the headlights for a more cohesive fascia design. But does it work? We’ll let you be the judge of that…

 

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28 Comments on “Volkswagen Crosses Its Tiguan...”


  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    The last two generations of Passat have each grown three inches longer. It’s adding up. 191 inches and counting. In person, the new Passat seems vast, or, at least, half-vast. (drum roll) And I still have to duck my head to get in. Every VW model seems to have a similar glandular problem, like it’s been stretched a size longer. Once again, VW is out of touch. As other auto headlines report a bumper crop of small cars, and the Koreans innovate and expand, VW gives us land yachts. Oh well– the “mpre car for the money” crowd will be pleased.

    As for this CCC, it looks like what a Golf would have evolved into if the whole slammed-down look hadn’t become so popular. It has decent ground clearance, enough for everyday hazards like angled driveways and parking curbs. It just looks like a car to me, and a pretty nice one…

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      Once again, VW is out of touch.

      Yeh, sales up 51.5% they are soooo out of touch.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      In person, the new Passat seems vast, or, at least, half-vast. (drum roll) And I still have to duck my head to get in. Every VW model seems to have a similar glandular problem, like it’s been stretched a size longer. Once again, VW is out of touch.

      VW Passat sales in Oct. up 986.2% year over year.

      http://media.vw.com/newsrelease.do;jsessionid=6293C1C10DD97F420F9C3F8F3C9611C3?&id=947&allImage=1&teaser=volkswagen-america-sales-increase-39.6-percent-october&mid=1

      How are they out of touch again?

      • 0 avatar
        Byron Hurd

        Quote the MT Car of the Year or something, not those laugh-worthy stats. You couldn’t find a Passat for sale this time last year if you tried.

        I do like that Volkswagen is doing their own version of the Crosstour though. Even looks like it from the front.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        You couldn’t find a Passat for sale this time last year if you tried.

        Because no one wanted to buy them not because VW didn’t want to sell them.

      • 0 avatar
        Byron Hurd

        Yes, but comparing to the last two years of crippled inventory doesn’t make the point, especially when you’re talking about the first few months of a new car going on sale, when delivery numbers are front-loaded with fleet sales and corporate leases.

        When times were good for the last-gen Passat, they were moving around 3k a month.

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        When times were good for the last-gen Passat, they were moving around 3k a month.

        So, next October do they sell more or less than 3k Passats a month?

      • 0 avatar
        jmo

        the last two years of crippled inventory

        Yes, crippled by a total lack of demand.

    • 0 avatar
      dmw

      A Golf on chrome donks. How did VW not realize that people really wanted their cars jacked up and fitted with enormous, heavy wheels?

      I find it amusing that people want donked cars so they can have ground clearance for “angled driveways.” Yes, that is exactly why people are doing the same to ’80s crown vics. It’s a style and just a style. From the 3rd Ward to Greenwich, everyone wants to ride up high.

    • 0 avatar
      vento97

      > Every VW model seems to have a similar glandular problem, like it’s been stretched a size longer.

      The same goes for every Honda model, every Toyota model, etc.

      The worlds automakers somehow decided that their smaller offerings wouldn’t work with the increasing girth of U.S. drivers, as well as U.S. driving habits which are geared towards passive safety (as opposed to active safety) – hence the additional safety equipment needed for U.S. market vehicles to comply with government safety standards. Added vehicle weight is the expected consequence of safety compliance.

  • avatar
    THE_F0nz

    Make it affordable, agile, manual trans, and the 2.0T from the A4. It would grab my serious attention immediately. I’ve already looked (and am considering) the Tiguan, but the height of the vehicle screams soccer mom.

    I’m a 26 year old engineer, hope to own a dog soon, I play goalie in hockey, I own guitars and amplifiers for small shows, and I HATE driving a vehicle that sloshes around in the turns.

    The infiniti FX has the performance, but I haven’t been able to get past the looks or the price tag once a few options are ticked.

    I would imagine a FWD version of this with a good swaybar upgrade would be everything I need and keep great gas mileage with the 2.0T and a fun 6-speed.

    • 0 avatar
      Pinzgauer

      Take a look at the Juke, should fit your requirements. Quick, handles great, 6 Speed, and my Goalie equipment fits in there no problem. You’ll get past the looks once you drive it, trust me on that one.

  • avatar
    jmo

    Wow that is a hot looking vehicle.

  • avatar
    Bimmer

    For some reason, side profile in main picture reminds me of jacked-up Chrysler 300, minus the trunk.

  • avatar
    zerofoo

    I’d love a Touareg sized vehicle that doesn’t cost as much as a Touareg. I could lose things like rain-sensing wipers, leather seats, nav, push button start, sunroof, memory seats, dual climate control, heated reclining rear seats….on and on.

    Is there really a need for a vehicle size between a Tiguan and a Touareg? I don’t think the Touareg is really all that big (no 3rd row…etc).

    -ted

  • avatar
    Sinistermisterman

    My initial reaction was “Oh no not another chunky friggin’ CUV,” but on looking at these pictures it actually looks… not bad. I actually quite like the new front end. It’s far more subtle than Ford’s über-fake-chrome-bling.
    It also looks far nicer and quite svelte compared to some of the bloated CUV monstrosities currently wallowing around on the road. My prediction? If VW build this vehicle as it looks now, it will sell well. Hell, even if they do inject some lard into the final design it’ll still probably sell well.

  • avatar
    orick

    high belt line, sloping rear, 20″ rims, sure look practical

    what do I know, this thing will probably sell like hotcake.

  • avatar
    dglynn

    That rear end looks like an Infiniti FX35. Might be stylish, but gives up a lot of room having that steep angle.

  • avatar
    Eddie_515

    Wow. That thing looks like a vw NOT. I do not recognize it as a VW from the front, side, rear end, and dashboard look.

    How do we judge manufacturer success in the marketplace? Do we use different criteria for short-, mid-, and long-term sales (projections)? It seems VW wants to be the new Toyota in the US, but here is where I could use a lesson in history. How much was interaction with the US market responsible for the development of a Toyota brand identity? I presume VW has a much-bigger US-irrelevant baggage. If that was the case, then it is putting much more at risk by Americanizing the Jetta and Passat.

    Upward sales? Couldn’t contribute any less to this debate at this moment in time.

  • avatar
    Advo

    I wish the grill wasn’t mere chrome but extended the LEDs into an interesting, full-width light-bar.

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    I wish VW had better imagination than just ripping off Ford and Honda grilles…
    I’m quite sure someone will say it’s a creative or innovative thing too :P I hate it when they get credited for stuff so old that people forgot who should get the credit…

    • 0 avatar
      Advo

      I wish Tiguans were cheaper so they would be more viable alternatives to CRVs and RAV4s.

    • 0 avatar
      vento97

      > Appraised as VW always is, for finally coming up with an idea the Japanese had 15 years ago…

      Which is a classic case of role-reversal.

      • 0 avatar
        Zykotec

        Strangely enough, VW has always been late, they started making their model-T some 30 years after Ford, they started making their Mini some 20 years after Mini did, they started the GTi-trend around 10-15 years after Ford did,they made their Capri 5 years after Ford, they started making Efi’d engines in their ‘upper’ tier vehicles 10-15 years after Volvo and Opel, they built their version of the Cosworth Escort 15 years after it was out of production, was appraised for the bright idea of making the Polo Cross, after the Rover Streetwise had gone out of production, and the list goes on. the fact that it took them more than . 10 years to start developing a competitor for the CR-V and Rav4 is just one in a loooong list…
        I’ll give them the reasonable build quality feeling though :)

  • avatar

    All I see here is an (already beautiful) Audi A5 in a cheap dress…


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