By on October 19, 2011

When Buick announced that it would not be rebadging the Opel Insignia OPC as the Buick Regal GS, and that instead of the OPC’s all wheel drive and turbocharged V6 we’d be getting a front-drive turbo four performance model, I was a bit skeptical. On paper, the proposed GS just didn’t seem different enough from the turbo model (which I liked well enough as-is) to elicit much initial enthusiasm. But this is why we drive cars instead of just comparing spec sheets: having spent some time alone with the GS, I’m happy to report that my skepticism was entirely unnecessary.

The first three minutes or so of the forty-odd minutes I spent hammering the GS around the hills of the Northern Willamette Valley, I spent familiarizing myself with the GS’s whistling turbo. After some light lag, the turbo starts twisting out a smooth river of torque that seems to swell graciously (rather than ferociously) under the driver’s right foot. Switching from a naturally-aspirated six-cylinder to the GS, there’s a brief adjustment in driving style, requiring subtle turbo management as the boost build. But by the time the first curves in the road appear, the turbo’s learning curve is over and I’ve figured out how to keep 295 ft-lbs at the ready.

Though the ride feels utterly planted and the few short bends are easily dispatched, the sight of the first sharp corner has me rushing for the brakes. This is, after all, a front-drive Buick, and there are no shoulders or guardrails between it and a thrilling adventure in potentially fatal understeer. The GS shrugs off the speed, turns in with surprising sharpness, and before I know it the boost is building again under my foot and we’re away. On the next corner I brake considerably less, and it pitches intuitively into the turn, and then clings furiously to the asphalt as I feed in the throttle. With each successive corner I push a little bit deeper, flick it a little more aggressively in the tighter turns, get on the throttle in the faster turns. In fact, I spent the rest of the drive trying desperately to find out what happens to the GS when it’s pushed to the point where a chassis shows its true colors… without success.

There are two basic schools of performance car preference: first is a car with low but exploitable limits, which delights with its playful incompetence, the second is a car that is so utterly composed that it delights with its sheer poise. My beloved Z3M fits in the first category, at its best when you’re pushing or catching it around corners. The Regal GS is squarely in the latter category, offering the kind of calmly assuring performance that allows extremely rapid on-road pace at while building the driver’s confidence at every step. Between the turbo’s power delivery, GM’s HiPer strut suspension, the stiffer “GS Mode” and some good summer rubber, the GS is able to take improbably high cornering speeds (GM claims .9g on the skidpad) with zero drama… you could tell this car you slept with its sister in the middle of a sharp curve, and it would simply shrug its shoulders and tug you to the next corner. But more than grip, the GS puts its power down so smoothly under so many circumstances, AWD would be an unwelcome addition.

More power and AWD or rear-drive elicit something of a Pavlovian response in auto enthusiasts, but the GS proves that a well set-up front-driver with a good manual transmission can be as much fun as anything else. It’s not a madhouse, eye-rolling, tongue-lolling kind of fun, like you get from, say, a CTS-V. It’s a quietly confident, real-world, hustle-you-home kind of fun that tugs incessantly at the corners of your mouth. The Buick yin to the Cadillac yang, if you will… at the same $35k-ish price point as the nowhere-near-as-fun-to-drive base CTS sedan. With apologies to John Lennon,  A middle-class hero is something to be… 

Buick made the vehicle for this review available at a launch event

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85 Comments on “Capsule Review: 2012 Buick Regal GS...”


  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Wow.

    WOW.

    As noted, the spec sheet doesn’t say it all and apparently the parts are greater than sum when you look at the spec sheet.

    It also seems Ed by your review that GM has done a good job of slotting feature/performance/price/perception for those who might go loaded Regal GS or entry level CTS.

    Who would have thought ten years ago Buick would be doing this much right, let alone still be alive as a brand.

  • avatar
    A Caving Ape

    Care to let me in on your secret test route?

  • avatar
    mikedt

    For crying out loud. To get the manual transmission you have to buy the most expensive Regal. And get this, it comes in a whopping 3 color choices, silver, white and black. Thanks for almost nothing buick.

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      And unfortunately, they’ll probably sell exactly that many manual-tranny GS’s…three. Sad, really…this looks to be a very entertaining ride.

    • 0 avatar

      Better than the usual pattern these days, where a manual is only available with the weakest engine.

      But here the manual transmission is also offered with the 220-horsepower 2.0T. I spotted a brown one at a local dealer, stopped by a couple weeks later to drive it, and learned that it had been sold. I figured it would NEVER sell.

      Turns out that this dealer, in the Detroit area, has sold about eight manual Regals.

      They’ll sell more than three GS’s with a manual, if only because it won’t initially be available with an automatic. Shame about the color choice limitation–the brown available with the other Regals is very nice.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Not true – you can get the Regal Turbo (midgrade) with a manual also.

  • avatar

    I think Buick hit the mark here in regards to building an option to an entry BMW or Acura. I enjoyed being in the Buick Regal FAR MORE than the Acura RL (this car targets the TSX).

    Unfortunately, when it comes to driving dynamics, I’d rather have the BMW 1 or 3.

    But seriously, who the hell is pushing the Buick Regal hard? Most people I see in them are either women or older couples who retired.

    GM seriously needs a better engine on this level if they aren’t willing to put in the 300HP engine from the CTS. Meanwhile, Kia Optimas and Hyundai Sonatas provide more power and driving fun at a lower price – and a loss of interior quality feel.

    http://www.epinions.com/review/2011_Buick_Regal_epi/content_513739755140

    I had/have a chance to test a Buick Verano this week at the Long Island auto show GM special event.
    AND FINALLY, I’ll be able to test the DODGE CHARGER SRT8 2012 THIS WEEKEND !!!! :P

  • avatar
    Spartan

    Great review for a great car. Those complaining that the TSX has lost its touch, Buick has the car you want.

    However, I think this car should be priced just a hair less, topping out at no more than $33k. Problem is, at $35k, it’s terribly close to G37 money where you get RWD and more power.

    • 0 avatar
      Doc

      I was thinking the same thing. Furthermore, it looks like an Acura TSX (with 4 cyl) loaded with manual trans is about 32k. I would think that this is the primary competition.

    • 0 avatar

      I agree with all of the above. But I haven’t driven the GS myself yet, and I leave room for the distinct possibility that I’d consider it $3-4k better than the current TSX (I used to be a big Honda/Acura fan; not so much nowadays). If I wanted a new car to commute in, this might be the first one I’d test-drive. It’s an appealing package.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    I love how the shiny metal pedals show off the precision of GM assembly. Or has the brake pedal merely lost its starch?

    • 0 avatar

      I think these pedals are exactly where the engineers intended them to be. Clutch pedals generally sit higher and have more travel than brake pedals.

      • 0 avatar
        turbosaab

        Interesting. In my Saab (and every other three pedal car that I can recall – admittedly, not many), the brake and clutch are evenly positioned.

      • 0 avatar
        ciddyguy

        I went back and looked at the photo of the dash and noted that the brake pedal is really just sitting higher in terms of its pivot arm than the clutch. My truck has both the clutch and brake about the same height and most other cars I’ve seen have this as well so not sure what the reasoning is here.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Put down the shovel Karesh!

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        Put away the snark CJ – GM know how to align pedals, they sell plenty of manual’s in Europe.
        So this is the third person on this site you think is in the tank for the manufacturer when not reviewing Honda product (Jack yesterday, Mike regularly and now Ed).

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        If GM knows how to do something, why do they neglect to do it some of the time? There is no question that the pedals are at random heights in this car, and there is ample evidence that the Regal has hurt Buick’s overall quality scores. Pretty much like every other Opel that has come to the US…

      • 0 avatar
        MoppyMop

        Let’s have a look at how some of CJ’s beloved Hondas do with pedal alignment.

        http://www.autotribute.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Honda-CR-Z-interior-2.jpg
        http://automobiles.honda.com/images/2011/civic-si-sedan/interior/interior-header.jpg

        Not much of an improvement. I think we know who really needs to put down the shovel.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Am I the only one who thinks CJ got dumped by his first true love in a GM car or something?

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        MoppyMop – thanks for the photos,I am sure CJ will not be replying to you. He seems to have a tendency when disproved to stop replying.
        I think GM can take it as a compliment that if the only thing he could find to complain about on the GS is “random” pedals then it must be doing a lot right. That is if they, or we, took his opinion seriously.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        FreedMike MoppyMop…..Well played both of you

  • avatar
    Zarba

    Good review; I was waiting for the Troy Queef “Dab Of Oppo” signoff.

    If only people would actually buy a manny-tranny Buick…

  • avatar
    TurboDeezl

    Looks like an awesome ride. Buick is quickly becoming a hot division. Farewell to Lucerne and hello to Verano, GS, etc. Did they outsell Lexus recently?

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Yup

    • 0 avatar
      dvp cars

      …tdeezl…I’m a little older, so farewell also to Parkys,LeSabres,ElectraDeuceQuarters,Roadmasters, Invictas,Wildcats,Supers,Limited’s,Centurys,Specials,Rivieras,Reattas, and my personal favorites…..Caballero Wagons…….Apollos and Somersets(except Butterscotch and Blue models) don’t count…….Buick Division had great model names….Y Job anyone?………did I miss any?

    • 0 avatar
      tankinbeans

      I had a Buick that I really liked. It was a 1991 LeSabre, and was a coupe by default, the driver’s side doors never opened in the time I had it. I ditched it because I got a different car, the loan (and first payment) for which was provided as a graduation present. I’d still drive that beast today if I had it.

      Some day I may look at a Buick, but not yet. Not quite old enough and haven’t “made it” yet. I’m still slogging through school and trying to get my footing. It’s a slow process, but I’m getting there.

  • avatar
    ninja14blue

    If you want your Regal GS to look like the one in the above pics, be ready to shell out almost $39K…that white paint? Extra. Those 20″ wheels? Extra. That moonroof? Extra. Navigation? Extra.

    I just don’t see many $39K GS Regals being sold after the first few hundred fanboys buy theirs.

    This would be an awesome car at around $30K…pushing $40K? No thanks. I would personally wait to see what the Cadillac ATS is going to be like…it’s most likely going to have the same engine, and will be proper RWD and also probably around $35K-$40K.

    • 0 avatar
      Doc

      Your right, just built one on the GM site. $38,650. That is serious money in that you get a lot of serious cars in that price range.

      The question is, how much money will be on the hood.

      • 0 avatar
        Zackman

        “The question is, how much money will be on the hood.”

        Doc, you stole my thunder! That’s what I want to know – what’s my true cost to own this bad boy, but to be honest, I wouldn’t opt for the stick, and I hate sun/moonroofs because I wear a hat most of the time and all the gee-gaws I don’t need either – I think I just talked myself out of a Buick! Darn! plain ol’ Chevy/Ford man through and through!

    • 0 avatar
      Monty

      Perhaps GM is taking a page from the Ford book – sell fewer cars at a higher transaction price and actually make a profit on each sale.

      In the event, and it’s a rather big question hanging out there, GM has improved the engineering and parts and build quality, there won’t be a blizzard of TSB’s and warranty issues for this model. Should this be the case, this will be one of the vehicles that will repair GM’s shattered reputation for quality and reliability.

      Buick seems to be conquesting a much younger demographic with its lineup – these aren’t your father’s or grandfather’s Buicks of yore. This car represents another step in the process.

      Thanks for the great review; I want to test drive one for myself, but as it’s not offered in a hatch or coupe form, it’s off the “list”.

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      You might want to try pricing another performance car with similar features and see what you get.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      A price in the high 30s for a car with this performance and equipment seems pretty reasonable to me.

  • avatar
    dvp cars

    ………wow, I love your impressions, I love the styling, I love the 4cyl/6 speed (and in this segment it’s availability is crucial, never mind the volume), throw in that turbo spooling whistle, and I smell a winner. Price, weight, and suspiciously absent mpg figures may mitigate my enthusiasm, but at least it’s a welcome contender.
    They’re doing some things right, and the various “Ecotechs” are competent enough, but the new GM needs a game changing breakthrough 4 cylinder to get worldwide respect. EV’s are nice, maybe even necessary, but a 45 mpg mid-market sedan will pay all the bills, AND make shareholders happy………a novelty experience in recent memory.

    • 0 avatar
      ciddyguy

      I don’t think you’ll get 45mpg out of this car, but low to mid 30? probably. An A or B segment car with a standard 4 pot motor should get closer to 40, if not 40 or a bit more right now.

      Fiat 500, the Kia Rio the Accent all get around 40 or more in the real world.

    • 0 avatar
      rem83

      MPG ratings are suspiciously the best of the Regal lineup at 20/32. Both Buick and the DOE’s websites seem to have the same number, but I’m still not believing this thing gets better mileage than the regular turbo.

      • 0 avatar

        Regal E-Assist (mild hybrid) is already listed on the EPA’s page for 2012, at 25/36. I spent some time in a LaCrosse E-Assist the day after driving the GS, and the system seems well refined (super-unobtrusive re-start, for example). It’s still trying to lug too much in the LaCrosse though (you have to thrash it to get any kind of pace up), but it should be worth a look in the lighter Regal.

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    A Buick that want’s you to spank it harder and pull it’s hair? Damn, where do I sign up?

    (Too bad the list price is about $10,000 more than I can afford.)

  • avatar
    Boff

    Cool car. I saw one locally…it’s BIG.

  • avatar
    rochskier

    Nice review, you must’ve read my mind as I’ve been looking around for someone to write up the Regal GS!

    I really want to like this car, but I think the price is too high and the badge on the grille is wrong for this type of vehicle.

    Perhaps I will look for one on the used market in 3 to 5 years.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      The price is higher than I would like but the problem is with the turbo (220hp) car, since the GS is only $2000 more than the top 220hp turbo model and has all of that equipment plus the enhanced engine, body kit, brembo brakes and suspension upgrades. If the base I-4 and turbo models could be lowered $1-2K then the GS could be lowered to say $33K.

  • avatar
    ciddyguy

    Nice review and it’s nice to see Buick and GM able to make cars that CAN perform and provide decent enough mileage and seem to be built decently enough to be competitive.

    However,as good as it is driving wise, it’s not what it’s mot me. I’ve never been much for 4 door sedans no matter HOW well they perform.

    Now if this were a hatchback form, then I might be entertained by it.

  • avatar
    22_RE_Speedwagon

    I love TTAC’s car reviews, let me start by saying. I think you’re on honest bunch.

    Up until a few years ago, I would have never considered buying a ford, cadillac, or a buick, but recently read all these reviews extolling their virtues (the new 5.0 OMG!, CTS-V for the win! Regal GS is the new GNX! Reborn! With a stick! I’ll admit, I’m starting to be tempted. But 6 months later the forums are ripe with complaints about the mustang’s transmission and gas tank and the CTS-V is the in the shop for myriad reasons and the Regal GS? Well, I don’t know yet. Cars break — I get that. And it’s not just the domestics that have design flaws (There isn’t a subaru SVX in the world with a transmission worth a damn, or 60000 miles, whichever comes first) But at what point do these performance bargains (5.0, CTS-V, GS??) stop being bargains because of the design flaws? I don’t know how you can simulate 10 years of ownership in an afternoon of testing but might I suggest, if you aren’t already, that you beat the living crap of these cars in the brief time you have them so we might extrapolate the potential weaknesses. All I can think of when I read a review like this what’s the TSB fodder.

    • 0 avatar

      If you’ve got a large, active forum, even a failure rate in the single digits can seem common.

      Every car has been driven hard for thousands of miles in an attempt to get things to break during development. We’re highly unlikely to surface problems with a single car in a single week of testing. I’ve had dozens of press cars. None have had mechanical problems.

      • 0 avatar
        SimonAlberta

        Michael, you make a great point.

        While the reality is that cars are more reliable and better built than ever (mostly) the internet would have you believe that almost every car is likely to leave you stranded every other time you drive it.

        Not only that, I think the definition of “reliability” is getting skewed these days due to the proliferation of high tech gadgets and gizmos. If the sat/nav plays up, requiring a dealership visit, that contributes to a negative reliability assessment but, in my view, is trivial and meaningless. As far as I am concerned, if it starts/stops/steers then it is reliable, the other stuff that needs attention from time to time is neither here nor there.

        Some people just seem to make such a drama out of a crisis….so your car causes you a handful of dealership visits over time. Big boo hoo!

        I believe the reality is that MOST people have very little trouble with their vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      I think this is a matter of expectations. That is, you can’t expect anyone reviewing a sample of a new car (especially one that should have been gone over with a fine toothed comb by the manufacturer before it was delivered to the reviewer) to be able to identify potential failure points which will show up 60,000 miles later. Obviously, if something does break during testing, you’d expect to be told about it.

      But I don’t think its reasonable to expect Ed or anyone else testing a sample of a new car to give you any idea of how reliable it will be. For that, all you have to go on is the manufacturer’s reputation.

      Just to take a glaring example: VW. A number of reviewers have liked some of VW’s sporty options — the GTI is, by now, a classic. Yet we all know, from Karesh’s web site, or Consumer Reports, or Repair Pal that VW’s reliability reputation is scary. (Among other things, Repair Pal verifies multiple reports that the R32′s DSG is subject to total failure, requiring replacement, at 60,000 miles.)

      But do we expect Jack Baruth to say, after praising the GLI (as he did), “but watch out, this car will kill you in repairs”? He has no basis for saying that . . . VW could have decided to spend a little more money on parts that don’t fail. The most that you could expect a reviewer to say is something like, “Past VW versions of this model have not been very reliable,” which is not saying much, really.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        Simon and DC I agree with alot of what you have both said. DC is right that VW had a bad reliability record in the early part of the 2000′s but looking at truedelta 2009 onwards seems to have been much better for VW models with them being average – not great but also not terrible.

        2009-2011 Golf/GTi 29-59 trips per 100 vehicles
        2009-2011 Jetta 17-59 trips per 100 vehicles

  • avatar
    Dynasty

    I really like this car. But I have a little trepidation from the lack of RWD (don’t need or want AWD). I need to go drive one.

    Is the hiperstrut that good?

    If you can live without the navigation and the sunroof, price is a little bit better. Besides, what’s the big deal about a sunroof anyways? I had a car with a sunroof before, and other than leaking slightly when it rained (a Honda) it ate up a lot of headroom.

    I seriously think after the newness of the sunroof wore off after about the first three weeks, I never opened up again.

    • 0 avatar
      pg123456789

      I agree. AWD unnecessary in more than 98% of situations … complex, weight, maintenance etc.

      Don’t need a sunroof … increases centre of gravity, weight on top, and maintenance.

      Don’t need navigation … use your phone or get an aftermarket, it’ll probably stay up to date and its movable to other cars.

      FWD could be a problem, but I’d have to drive one given its hyperstruts.

      The other issue is the ecotec engine … its been know to need frequent timing belt changes and this makes them expensive to maintain. Check European websites on Opels and Vauxhalls using the ecotec engine. Does this have a belt or chain?

    • 0 avatar
      Mikemannn

      Hiperstrut? meh… toyota tried a similar design in the ’90s and it was abandoned. They called theirs the Super Strut, but it looks a lot like the HiPerStrUt..

      • 0 avatar
        Educator(of teachers)Dan

        And Toyota wouldn’t have let it go as a general decontenting of their cars, now would they? I mean because obviously if Toyota’s not doing it, it’s not worth doing. (rolls eyes)

  • avatar
    NorthwestT

    I don’t know why they thought Buick would fit in the Saab slot.

  • avatar
    Dynasty

    On the Buick webppage to build your own, the Regal is listed as “2012 Regal GS FWD”

    FWD?

    The Lucerne is also listed as FWD, but there is an AWD option.

    Lucerne has no FWD designation and no AWD.

    Enclave listed as FWD with an AWD option.

    Is someone not telling us something?

  • avatar
    jeff_vader

    ‘ring,ring,ring’
    Hello is that Mr Muller? Hi Vic baby, it’s GM here. How’s it working out for you with Saab?? Vic?.. Vic?… There’s no need for that kinda language Vic, you knew what you were getting into, kiddo. Only a dumb schmuck would have bought it off us without doing his research first…Oh..
    Anyways, look, maybe we can cut you another deal? We got a car that looks just like that 9-5 piece of donkey doo we sold you. If you wanna, we can sell you a whole bunch of them wholesale, you can stick some Saab badges on them, you can say you built them, give them to the Chinese, badda-bing, you’ve got all their lovely money to spend on those funny looking coupes you like so much, you crazy Dutchman.
    What’s that, Vic? You say you haven’t even got enough money to pay for the badges. Well, I got a nephew who might be able to arrange you a special mortgage…. you don’t own the factories? Oh..Ok..
    Maybe you could sell us that yellow vintage Rolls-Roy………Vic?, Vic? are you still there? Vic?”

  • avatar
    jdmcomp

    Nice cars, even better in European form. However, for the money, tell me why I should not buy a Kia/Hun turbo version and save 10K in cash?

  • avatar
    Zarf

    I drove an Insignia Diesel for a week in England last may.
    I was actually in the market for a new car and I loved my rental so much the day after I got home I went and drove a Regal turbo.

    Everything about my rental car was better (even the right hand drive which I have decided I prefer).

    The new Regal is the nicest Buick I have ever driven and the first GM product I have ever considered. Sadly, even as good as it was, they softened it up too much, made the steering too light and I missed the fuel mileage of the diesel.

    Okay, all my friends laughed when I said I was considering a Buick (too much old man stigma).

  • avatar
    tced2

    It has the infamous recent GM problem – too much weight. The oft-mentioned competitor to this car is the Acura TSX which is about 3200 pounds. The Regal is 400 lbs heavier. “Road hugging weight” doesn’t work anymore – it lowers fuel economy and hurts handling.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Good review. Seeing this car gives me hope that a Malibu SS version may appear at some point with similar equipment, at least in terms of the drivetrain.

    I don’t see myself in the market for a $35K+ car, although one in the high $20K’s would be more plausible. If I were in the market for something like this both price and equipment level-wise, this would definitely be on my shopping list.

    Glad to see that GM is willing to expand the definition of Buick beyond old people’s cars. I could see my kids or nieces and nephews driving something like this. I see a lot of Regals in my area, which I’m guessing is good news.

  • avatar
    VanillaDude

    It still looks like a Saturn Aura.

  • avatar
    John R

    I did some building on various sites – and for me, this Buick is a hard sell. To get this Buick the way I want it its going to cost me $38k~. There are a couple moves I’d rather make than pay $38k for a Buick…

    Much better car – Spend the extra 3-4 grand for an Infiniti 37S 6MT (something tells me it’ll be worth it).

    As good or a bit better car – Spend the exact same money on a Maxima with the sport package or save 6 grand and get a Legacy 2.5GT (Or go completely bat-shit and get a Lan-Evo MR, STI or WRX.)

    Little worse car – Save myself $10k and pick-up a Sonata/Optima Turbo and mount a set of summer tires on it.

  • avatar
    Banger

    I like it. My mom has honestly considered trading her low-mile RWD Lincoln LS for a plain-jane Regal. It’s a nice-looking car, for sure, and would get slightly better fuel economy than the Linc.

    Sign me up for the stick version when these are just out of warranty on the used lots at $15k-18k. Should be a fun car if the reliability’s there.

  • avatar
    pg123456789

    Here’s a maintenance concern … it has an ecotec engine which in the past have been known to be expensive in relation to more frequent that expected timing belt changes (see European Opels and Vauxhalls). Does it have a belt of a chain?

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      99% sure that it has a timing chain. In fact, I am pretty sure that all of the ECOTEC engines having timing chains and not belts.

      • 0 avatar
        pg123456789

        Thanks … they are chains, but I think ecotec, especially those early ones had a habit of breaking frequently (as early as 80,000km I’ve heard). Yes … chains. I’m sure there’ll be plenty of forum discussions on this. I wonder whether this has improved. It’s a lot of money to replace every time. This engine is a high output one, so I think it would be important.

      • 0 avatar

        My Astra has the 1.8 ECOTEC and it is belt driven cams.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    Did you ever get new tires for your Bimmer, Ed? With some serious rubber, its limits should be much higher than this Regal’s!

    This car sounds pretty good. Looks decent too. I’d test drive one if I were in the market.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    I am shocked at how much I like this car. I can’t wait to drive one… It could make the short list for our next car.


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