By on September 19, 2011

“Chris” from Ford’s “Press Conference” commercial, which has received extensive media play recently from TTAC to Fox News, has uploaded a Youtube video in order to give his own, non-Ford-approved perspective on the controversy. He claims to be “just a guy who loves his F-150,” and insists that the commercial wasn’t staged or intended to be about the bailout. And based on his spontaneous thoughts in this video, the ideological component of his views do seem genuine. But don’t take my word for it, watch for yourself.

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12 Comments on “Ford’s “Bailout Guy” Fires Back...”


  • avatar
    Volt 230

    it would have been embarrassing if he had bought a Fusion or a Fiesta

  • avatar
    geeber

    This shows the risks of using real customers in commercials when everyone has easy access to youtube, and can quickly post homemade videos giving his or her side of the story. Imagine if he had said something really embarrassing in this video. It would be a PR nightmare for Ford.

  • avatar
    Advance_92

    It was never about him; responsibility lies with Ford and the way they chose to publicize the man’s views.

  • avatar
    Mullholland

    As an advertising professional who has worked in the car business for more than 30 years, I can assure everyone that EVERY detail of EVERY commercial is staged and cast and directed and edited. Yes, even the tried-and-true testimonials that have now morphed into the almighty “reality/viral” TV meme.
    I do agree with one thing the man claims, after listening to his phrasing and language in this “home made” video: He is no actor but he certainly is a tool. This video smells like another FoMoCo production to me. Creating a deeply personal, utterly unnecessary extension of the campaign started by the original commercial. In short, it’s brilliant!

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      He is no actor but he certainly is a tool. This video smells like another FoMoCo production to me. Creating a deeply personal, utterly unnecessary extension of the campaign started by the original commercial. In short, it’s brilliant!

      Agree on all counts, except for the “unnecessary” part. In this day and age, viral marketing is where it’s at, which makes YouTube an obligatory component of the marketing plan.

      This strikes me as one of those ads that is meant to generate buzz but that will rarely be run as a paid spot. Most of the hype will come from political blogs and outlets such as Fox News, which will happily play it for free.

      This famous ad helped LBJ to sink the Goldwater campaign. What’s most interesting about it is that it was devastatingly effective even though it was run only once, and then in an era long before the internet: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63h_v6uf0Ao

      • 0 avatar
        FleetofWheel

        What is really interesting is that people were so easily duped by a crass commercial suggesting a wee wittle girl with a flower would be blown to pieces if you don’t vote for LBJ. Holding a puppy over a cliff must have not been deemed sufficiently exploitative.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      For me, whether the commercial was staged or not is secondary because if I were to ever buy another domestic-brand half-ton truck again, I would more than likely choose an F-150 6.2L for exactly the same reasons that this guy outlined re: the bail outs and nationalization of failed companies GM and Chrysler.

      Still, if you watched the original commercial at the Ford after-sale interview, you can see that the guy looks down to the table at his talking points before speaking on-topic.

      This is just another commercial designed to sell a product, in this case a line of products manufactured by a company named Ford. If Toyota had done it, or Honda, the blogosphere would be outraged by the audacity of the effort by a foreign company to try and influence the hearts and minds of the buying public with articulate stagecraft.

      This is playing on the public’s sentiments about bail outs, hand outs and nationalization. And it hit a nerve with the majority of Americans who opposed bail outs, hand outs and nationalization.

  • avatar
    Canuck129

    Ford is hoping they don’t have another “Joe the Plumber” on their hands…

  • avatar
    Omnifan

    Didn’t Ford take government loans in the guise of improved manufacturing processes and fuel economy development? Or did they forget about those loans, which aren’t paid back yet.

  • avatar
    mikedt

    Why does this strike me as another “Joe The Plumber” looking to cash in on his 15 minutes of fame?

  • avatar
    hifi

    There are a lot of people who care about the issue of automakers taking government funds. They all get it in one way or another. But the TARP funds were unprecedented, and there are a lot of people who are turned off by GM and Chrysler because of it.

  • avatar
    d503kemp

    Welcome to your 15 minutes “Bailout Guy.” I stand by my comments on other posts, the add in question was made for this guy and those like him, the domestic pickup truck driving, rugged individualist. Good job Ford, enjoy your Meme and as others have said you got your own Joe The Plumber.


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