By on August 23, 2011

Today, Porsche officially disclosed top-secret pictures of the new “Neunelfer”, a.k.a. the 2012 Porsche 911. Most of these pictures have already been all over the webs. In a year, you’ll find them on Wikileaks.

In the name of completeness, here is the whole take, released today, along with the news that:

“At 48, the Porsche 911 Carrera is younger than ever: The completely redesigned generation of the sports car icon is stepping into the limelight with its flat, stretched silhouette, exciting contours and precisely designed details, yet from the very first glance it remains unmistakably a 911. True to the 911 tradition, the distinctive Porsche design language with its tendons and muscles exudes power and elegance.”

Who’s writing those lines?

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34 Comments on “Top-Secret 911 Pictures Released...”


  • avatar
    threeer

    Um..didn’t you write some of this kind of stuff back in the day?

    Sounds like a “nip and tuck” advert…stretch here, flatten there…

    • 0 avatar

      Um..didn’t you write some of this kind of stuff back in the day?

      Never ever. We wrote advertising. We had professional standards to uphold.

      “True to the 911 tradition, the distinctive Porsche design language with its tendons and muscles exudes power and elegance.”

      Or rather:

      “Ganz in der Tradition des Elfers drückt die unverwechselbare Porsche-Formensprache mit ihren Sehnen und Muskeln Kraft und Eleganz aus.”

      Who’s writing here? E.T.A. Hoffmann, late Sturm & Drang?

  • avatar
    chuckrs

    exudes – look up the definition and its usually along the lines of ‘discharge moisture or gas’

    a truly infelicitous word

    maybe the copy is better in the original German

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      Exudes is generally to sweat or ooze out, and it is common (and an acceptable) practice to use it in the manner Porsche did.

      Porsche’s release is the standard “we really have nothing to important to say right now so lets use flowery language to make it seem more impressive.”

      • 0 avatar
        VanillaDude

        Nonsense. That is called “sweating” or “oozing”.
        When one perspires, normally we use the verb form of sweat or ooze. We don’t put a verb with these words as a noun.

        Exuding means to give off an attitude, an atmosphere or an air.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        We don’t normally but a verb with those nouns, but that doesn’t mean it can’t be done. I was exuding sweat after running 2 miles is just as correct as saying I was sweating after running 2 miles. Just because no one says things like that doesn’t mean its wrong (and frequently the common accepted usage is often considered wrong, a la the famous who am I speaking to versus to whom and I’m speaking)

        I’m not sure why you think it is strange that the words I used can also be used as a verb, that’s pretty common.

    • 0 avatar

      They would be referring to the more frequently used form of exude, which is “to display conspicuously or abundantly” (Merriam-Webster).

      I rarely hear exude used in the form you mention.

      • 0 avatar
        chuckrs

        Echid

        And yet the first definitions from Merriam Webster and a couple of other online dictionary definitions are to sweat, ooze or discharge. At Merriam, the second transitive use definition is as you suggest, but the first is: to cause to ooze or spread out in all directions. And the Latin etymology is to sweat.

        Serve the copywriter a couple more martinis and have him come up with a better word.

        der Porsche furzen eleganz – nah, doesn’t work any better in pidgin German

      • 0 avatar

        I wasn’t saying that your definition was incorrect, I was saying that it is barely, if ever, used in that form. In fact, I’ve never actually heard it used by person or print in that form. That word has largely become synonymous with showing quality, luxury etc. It is a perfectly acceptable usage of the term, and I think it is a rather good word.

    • 0 avatar

      I’d tolerate “exudes” when on a deadline. But a language with tendons and muscles ??? Pretty strong language, I’d say.

  • avatar
    VanillaDude

    Nah – in Germany there is no need for advertisement. You are to know if you are to need a Porsche, have the ability to purchase a Porsche and if you do not know, then you are not to have a Porsche.

    Umweltfreundlich That’s all that is necessary.

    Why would you need to ask?

  • avatar

    I think the Cayman should become Porsche’s new bread and butter. It is a much better platform and its body style has not worn out its welcome yet. Keep the 911 for the die hard Porsche fans who value performance and nostalgia, and give the Cayman free reign. If it outsells the 911, so be it. If not, you have lost nothing. I love the idea of owning a Porsche, but if I am spending that kind of money, I want something that looks good and does not look like every other Porsche made in the last 30 years. I never want to hear, “is that new?” after plunking down $100K+ for the latest model.

    • 0 avatar
      mnm4ever

      The trendy cars designed to impress your neighbors are next door at the Audi dealer.

      • 0 avatar

        The Audi R8 is definately a better looking vehicle and has all the performance one could want. Unfortunately, Audi reliability sucks.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        And Porsche reliability is so stellar? RMS failure ring any bells? Audi, especially at that price level, doesnt have any more reliability issues than anyone else. Besides, you will only be leasing it!

      • 0 avatar

        I do not lease vehicles. It is money wasted, IMO. I think you need to review the TrueDelta data on Audi. They are far worse than just about every other auto maker except Jaguar. Even Porsche has better reliability but that is to be expected if you never change anything of significance.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        OK, tell us… whats True Delta say about the R8 reliability?? I doubt there are enough owners submitting information to even make a judgement on it, but the 2 people I know who own them have had no issues whatsoever.

        As for leasing, lets face it, anyone who is buying (or leasing) a $100k car and is concerned with impressing people doesnt really care about money. They also do not want to keep a car very long… how impressive is it to own a 4 or 5 year old car?!?!? But lets say they are somewhat fiscally responsible… any new $100k car doesnt have the greatest resale value anyway. Its very likely that leasing it will cost you you less than buying it and trading it in.

        But really none of that matters. My point is, if you are mostly concerned with looks and impressing the neighbors with your new $100k car, then you shouldnt be looking at the Porsche. The 911 is iconic for a reason. You are either a Porsche guy, or you are not. I fell in love with the Porsche 911 in the 70s and 80s, and I love how the same basic design carries over today. I dont want them to restyle it based on whatever is trendy today. And how can you say that the Cayman’s looks havent worn out thier welcome, when it looks just like a 911??

      • 0 avatar

        If you re- read what I wrote, you will see that I said Audi reliability sucks. I made no specifics of the R8 although if you can not build a single reliable car in your whole line up, then the odds of the R8 becoming a poster child for reliability is statistically improbable.

        I tend to hang on to my cars so leasing is a no win proposition for me. If you have more money than you know what to do with, then leasing may be a great solution, especially if you purchase vehicles with no regard for reliability. The rest of us mortals have to take reliability under heavy consideration.

        Even those of us who find the different model years of the 911 undistinguishable have no problem spotting the difference in the Cayman which was introduced in 2006. It may not be the most beautiful but its different and its overall design is superior to the 911. If given the resources, the Cayman would outperform the 911. Its Porsches own single mindedness that limits the Cayman’s full potential.

        Once again, if you re read what I wrote, I specifically said keep the 911 for people like you. But, if Porsche is going to strangle the performance of the Cayman just to keep 911 owners happy, then those that find the 911 an uninteresting design will have no reason to buy any Porsche. And that, I think you would agree, is not good for business.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        And my point was directed only at the R8, not then entire lineup. Dont get me wrong here, I am no Audi fanboi or anything, I was just putting the R8 out there as the poster child for fashionable new styling that tends to appeal to the new money type of people. Personally, I dont care for it.

        My other point was that if long term reliability IS a concern, you shouldnt buy either a Porsche or an Audi.

        I also agree with you that the Cayman is a better platform that is purposely held back by Porsche to not embarass the 911, and I dont agree with that business model.

        But I definitely do not agree with your assessment that the Cayman is much different from the 911. Sure the proportions are slightly off thanks to the mid engine, but overall its obviously meant to mimic the 911 styling. No one will mistake a Cayman for an Audi or a Vette or a Ferrari.

        FYI — I wouldnt buy one of these new 911′s either, unless I hit the lotto and picked up a GT3 RS, strictly for track days. And even then, I would only want that after I stocked my garage with a 1973 911 RSR, a early 80s 911 Turbo, and probably a 1989 Speedster. I prefer the real classic 911s to the new copies.

  • avatar
    Type57SC

    kind of looks like a sad robot face in the rear view.

  • avatar
    redliner

    I’m convinced that humans are evolving faster than the Porsche design language. In 30 years, while everyone is driv… er, um riding in their electric autonomous Google bubbles, a 911 will still look basically the same.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Just yesterday, having followed a Panamera S for a couple of blocks on my way home, it appears from the photos is that Porsche has successfully translated its “fat butt” “design language” from the sedan to its 46-year old iconic model. This, despite the fact that, in one car, the engine is in the front and in the other car, the engine is in the rear.

    Congratulations, fellas.

    Sure, the 911SC of the early 80s had flared rear fenders to accommodate the staggered wheel sizes intended to tame the 911′s legendary trailing throttle oversteer. But the entire scale of the car was smaller than the Panamera or — I’m guessing — the current (new) version of the 911. Somehow, when you scale that up by 20%, the result is . . um . . . grotesque.

  • avatar
    evan

    Here was a perfect opportunity to really re-think the 911′s shape and style, and they did this… Even the otherwise bland 996 had a neat, curvy cutline for the front hatch. This is just ‘blah’ all around.

    If you want to know how dull and lifeless modern Porsche styling is, go to a Cars and Coffee; all of the latest water-cooled cars are completely overlooked in favor older Alfas or 356′s and the like. No one gives a damn about a new light cluster of different vents when the overall design is so uninspired and worthless.

    • 0 avatar
      redliner

      “…overall design is so uninspired and worthless”

      I wouldn’t go that far. However I do think the “Porsche look” has been thoroughly played out. They should keep one or two models with classic styling, and then reinvent the rest of the model range with a 21 century design.

      • 0 avatar
        Tarditi

        They tried that… the 928. Wonderful car, powerful, modern, comfortable. You can find them regularly for $5000-$10,000; or in EXCELLENT shape for around $20K.

        They just don’t have what people wanted.

        There are legions of ‘vette fans that will line up speaking about 911 design and snap oversteer, yadda yadda, Z06 this and ‘ring that. Bottom line, most Porsche fans wouldn’t own a ‘vette and vice-versa.

        If you have (or have had) a 911, it’s probably one of the best driving experiences in your life. If you complain about the design being old, or maintenance being expensive, then you might have selected the wrong steed.

    • 0 avatar
      geggamoya

      It looks like a 911 should look. If you want different styling, Audi will be happy to sell you an R8 for example. Which i don’t like the look of, but many do.

      I don’t understand why the Corvette is inevitably brought up in every 911 thread, unless people do all car comparing on the base of spreadsheets. I rode in a new Grand Sport 4LT a couple of days ago and sure it was fast, but the interior was rubbish and the tyre noise was deafening. The dash and door-panels were supposedly covered with leather but i’ve seen vinyl that looks and feels more like leather. Let’s not even mention the “carbonfibre” bits.

      And before Vette owners murder me in the face with a really hot french frie, it is cheaper than a 911 for similar performance and i can easily see why someone who doesn’t want better NVH characteristics would buy one. It’s fun.

  • avatar

    God, TTAC writers should just write “Commence inevitable/overdramatic whining and bitching about various design details you think ruin everything ever” at the bottom of every picture-related story they post.

    It looks fine, we all knew it was going to have only minor design changes.

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    The 911 is a like the Rolex Datejust… a new version every year, but you still recognize it as basically the same item. Even though most of us have an idea of what the ‘iconic’ Datejust looks like (please be not the gold bezel with gold striped-Jubilee bracelet!), the design ‘evolves from there. Welcome to postmodernism… the 911 was ‘modern’… being of it’s time and epoc…. now we are in the thermodynamic heat death of postmodern design.

  • avatar
    Britspeak

    ‘Worthless’ is a strong word, but in my opinion it seems appropriate when you consider that the styling of new 911s adds nothing to their desirability.

    The mechanical package, driving experience, brand, etc is what sells these cars – not aesthic value. Perhaps there are some prospective buyers that actually find this style very appealing (I have yet to meet one), but as a current 911 owner, I want nothing to do with this copy of a copy of a copy.

  • avatar
    V572625694

    Hard to imagine why someone who has a satisfactory-performing 997 (the current model) would want to upgrade to this one. There’s hardly any difference.

  • avatar
    stuki

    That interior just does not have the charm of even the 997, not to mention the 993. It’s nice, just too “business class” for a sportscar with a long tradition.

  • avatar

    As there are no feature pages anymore, I’d presume that this is the contemporary style of “using curlers on a bald head.” (Karl Kraus).


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