By on August 18, 2011

With Honda and Toyota struggling to catch up after months of tsunami-related supply interruptions, Nissan’s been passing its major Japanese competitors in sales volume, and they apparently want to keep it that way. As Bertel has reported, Nissan was able to walk away from the tsunami’s devastation practically unharmed, and it’s leveraging its strong supply of vehicles to make hay while the sun shines (or while its competitors are struggling to catch up). This ad, which is a simple reminder to consumers, is only slightly tinged with competitive feist in a scene depicting a frustrated Honda customer. Overall though, there’s not much messaging needed: Nissan has cars, other Japanese competitors don’t. And right now, that could be one of the most effective marketing messages out there. After all, as Autoobserver points out, folks trading in Japanese cars still overwhelmingly buy another Japanese car… so simply having Japanese cars on dealer lots is a huge advantage at the moment.

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56 Comments on “Nissan: We Have Cars!...”


  • avatar
    alluster83

    As someone who would like to see Toyota and Honda go away for good, I think this is a tasteless cheap shot by Nissan. Toyota and Honda are hurting because of a terrible event completely out of their control.

    Similarly, I wasn’t all too excited about GM taking the sales crown this year. I want GM to kick Toyota’s rear on even playing grounds. Next year Toyota is fair game.

    • 0 avatar

      Curious, why do you want to see Toyota and Honda in particular “go away for good”? These are companies which have (at least in the past, perhaps not now) revolutionized the everyday automobile for the better. British cars that wouldn’t start in the rain? Japanese cars did. Horrible, cheap, inefficient small American cars? The Japanese could got it right. Honda especially has been responsible for bringing the small, efficient, high-tech 4-cylinder movement to our current crop of cars. Without these two behemoths of innovation/quality we would be left with a lot less competition in the marketplace (especially during the awful 80s), and American cars wouldn’t be nearly as good as they are today. I just don’t understand such attitudes. The more the merrier, always.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        Echid: You have to remember that the majority of the cars that the Japanese makes sell here are their cars they do best. The US doesn’t get the vast majority of their output. They used to (and probably still do, I don’t follow the Japanese domestic industry) release their cars in the home market and work out the bugs before exporting to other markets. By the time they get here, they’re pretty well sorted out, no wonder folks thought they were perfect.

        I don’t argue that the competition has it’s benefits, but there were lots of allegations back in the malaise days about dumping in the US market. I don’t have time to research right now, but I think there were some judgments against some of the Japanese makes for dumping in the US market.

        IMO the Europeans had been doing the high tech 4 cylinder stuff as far back as the 70′s (BMW 2002 anyone?), it wasn’t until the early-mid 80′s we started to notice the Japanese makes as particularly innovative. However, once they got the template figured out, they did a very good job of it.

        I’m with you, though, the more the merrier.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        They used to (and probably still do, I don’t follow the Japanese domestic industry) release their cars in the home market and work out the bugs before exporting to other markets.

        That isn’t really true. The cars that are sold to world markets are usually launched at about the same time, while many of the mainstream sellers such as the Camry and Ohio-built Accords are purpose-built designed for North America.

        So no, we aren’t getting debugged versions of the cars. They’re just as reliable or unreliable abroad as they are. Toyota and Honda have used better design and production processes compared to the domestics, which explains the better quality. Nissan is not quite so adept at such things, so it is more inconsistent, with some models being good but with other models being below average.

    • 0 avatar
      PintoFan

      I don’t think it’s tasteless. I think it’s Nissan calling Toyota and Honda’s bluff. The cars are there- nobody wants them. Head to your local Honda or Toyota dealer this weekend if you don’t believe me- acres of cars for as far as the eye can see. And at the Toyota dealer at least, you can probably pick up a nice number of incentives to boot.

      • 0 avatar
        GarbageMotorsCo.

        Take pictures

        Btw, there are more new Snuzes out there than there are new Camrys.

        http://www.cars.com/go/search/newBuyIndex.jsp?stkTyp=N&tracktype=newcc&mkId=20088&AmbMkId=20088&AmbMkNm=Toyota&make=Toyota&AmbMdNm=Camry&model=Camry&mdId=20800&AmbMdId=20800&rd=100000&zc=23023&enableSeo=1

        http://www.cars.com/go/search/newBuyIndex.jsp?stkTyp=N&tracktype=newcc&mkId=20053&AmbMkId=20053&AmbMkNm=Chevrolet&make=Chevrolet&AmbMdNm=Cruze&model=Cruze&mdId=35026&AmbMdId=35026&rd=100000&zc=23023&enableSeo=1

        Even less people “want” Snuzes according to your logic.

      • 0 avatar
        GarbageMotorsCo.

        http://www.cars.com/go/search/newBuyIndex.jsp?stkTyp=N&tracktype=newcc&mkId=20088&AmbMkId=20088&AmbMkNm=Toyota&make=Toyota&AmbMdNm=Corolla&model=Corolla&mdId=20861&AmbMdId=20861&rd=100000&zc=23023&enableSeo=1

        http://www.cars.com/go/search/newBuyIndex.jsp?stkTyp=N&tracktype=newcc&mkId=20017&AmbMkId=20017&AmbMkNm=Honda&make=Honda&AmbMdNm=Civic&model=Civic&mdId=20823&AmbMdId=20823&rd=100000&zc=23023&enableSeo=1

        You’re full of doodoo.

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        A cars.com search is hardly indicative of all the inventory across the country. But even if we take your “research” at face value, the fact that there are only about 2k more Cruzes available than Camrys actually reinforces my argument- there are still plenty of Camrys left. I never said a single thing about Detroit, the domestics, or the availability of any other cars. You simply assumed that I cared about Detroit because you are so locked into the Domestic v. Import hivemind that you are incapable of independent thought. When somebody criticizes Toyota and Honda, it doesn’t automatically make them a rabid Detroit fan.

      • 0 avatar
        GarbageMotorsCo.

        “A cars.com search is hardly indicative of all the inventory across the country.”

        Really? Then find me a better one.

        “When somebody criticizes Toyota and Honda, it doesn’t automatically make them a rabid Detroit fan.”

        Um, clearly your idiotic claims that sales are down “because nobody wants them “is a direct attack, so screw criticism.

        I showed you the numbers, Honda and Toyota supplies are off by a significant amount. But by all means, continue to rely on your conspiracy theory. Too bad you don’t have facts to back up your claims.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Stay classy Nissan.

  • avatar
    jj99

    Problem with Nissan is reliability. That is one reason they have cars.

    • 0 avatar
      morbo

      Tend to agree. Hey lookie here at GM’s supply!

      http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2011/06/gm-100-days-of-truck-inventory-aint-no-thang/

    • 0 avatar

      I agree with you. Toyota and Honda is more reliable car makes than Nissan. This situation is only temporary.

    • 0 avatar

      Well, they have been pretty reliable of late, AFAIK. The 3.5 is certainly solid, as are their CVTs (now), but problems may remain with the 2.5, not sure. Still, none of their engines are any more enthusing than the other Japanese makes, and I find their interiors cheap in comparison to Honda (although Toyota takes the cake on cheapness).

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        They’re still having problems with the CVTs. Boiled down to its simplest elements it still comes down to the cones and the steel belt.

        While the CVT may be an adequate general-purpose transmission for a grocery-getter, I would steer clear of them. And if it breaks after the warranty period ends, look at a mighty hefty repair bill.

    • 0 avatar
      eldard

      Not to mention the stereotype that Nissans rust easily. That is a perception that just won’t go away and I’ve been hearing since I was 10, back in 1991.

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        This is true, that stereotype has really stuck with them for a long time. I’ll be curious to see what all those Versas look like 10-15 years down the line- probably have plenty of orange accents by then.

    • 0 avatar
      GeneralMalaise

      Own a bought new 2007 350Z… a little over 76K miles… normal mtce… ZERO problems/defects.

      Zero problems/defects is something I can’t say about its predecessor, an ’04 Honda Civic Si, another new car purchase.

      Also own an ’01 Toyota Highlander (another bought new) with 197K miles now that runs and looks like a well-maintained two year old car. We’re going to keep this one to see how long she’ll last just because she is so good.

  • avatar
    George B

    Without competition, auto manufacturers become lazy. I for one am glad Nissan was lucky to have the parts to keep factories in Tennessee and Japan running. Just discovered that Nissan has factory tours in Smyrna, TN.

    http://factorytoursusa.com/TourDetails.asp?TourID=377

  • avatar
    philadlj

    When I first saw this on TV I thought it was in poor taste. I still do.

    It’s more disrespectful to Japan than to Nissan’s competition. Nissan wouldn’t be the successful global corporation it is today without all those decades of business making and selling cars in Japan.

    As narrow a message as the ad is trying to convey (we have cars), you and I both know the primary reason why they do: they were lucky. Kicking people while they’re down on theirs is in poor taste, even if the blow is delivered as lightly and vaguely as possible.

    If there were earthquakes or political unrest in the regions where Nissan produces cars, somehow I doubt Toyota and Honda would mock them.

  • avatar
    Secret Hi5

    Are Nissan execs are secretly exchanging high-fives in smoky backrooms?

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Until the last couple of months (I thought it was on this blog) that Nissan had some of the highest incentives on their cars or maybe just their midsized cars.

    Regardless, sometimes it’s better to be lucky than good.

  • avatar
    PintoFan

    Shortage? What shortage? As far as I’m concerned, the entire Toyota/Honda “shortage” is nothing more than a PR blitz designed to get consumers on to the lots. I understand that a lot of production was lost, but that doesn’t automatically equal a shortage, especially not with the inventory cushion that a lot of dealers are running right now. And more and more evidence seems to indicate that demand has been falling for the most popular Toyota/Honda models for a while now. The local Honda dealer is chock full of 2012 Civics, Accords, CR-V’s and Insights that nobody seems to be interested in buying. Same thing with all the Toyota dealers- there are rows upon rows of Camrys and Corollas just sitting there, waiting for buyers. What’s more, most of these have cash on the hood and/or lease deals. About the only Japanese car that seems to be in legitimately short supply is the Prius- and I’m not sure if that’s a purely local issue or nationwide.

    Bottom line, I do feel very bad for the people of Japan and their tragedy, but Toyota and Honda are milking the “shortage” with a whisper campaign to get people on the lots, hoping to ferret out sales. The cars are there; people aren’t buying them.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      As far as I’m concerned, the entire Toyota/Honda “shortage” is nothing more than a PR blitz designed to get consumers on to the lots.

      That’s veering dangerously into conspiracy territory.

      I suppose that it’s possible that the cars are being stored in Area 51, where they are being prepared for burial in deep space. But given what these companies’ production reports are stating, it seems pretty obvious that production has fallen substantially.

      Interestingly enough, that production decline coincides quite closely with the nuclear meltdown, tsunami and earthquake. As far as I can tell, those events actually did happen. Then again, I am naive enough to believe that the moon landing actually happened, too.

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        Read my post again. I’m not denying that production was lost. What I am denying is that this led to a widespread “shortage” of any vehicle, besides maybe a few with very close supply-demand relationships like the Prius (i.e. little inventory cushion). You can still buy a Corolla, Camry, Civic, Accord without a problem- the cars are there, waiting for buyers that aren’t coming. If there really are so few of them, then why is the Camry still so heavily incentivized, for example? Demand has peaked for these cars, and has been falling for some time. Toyota and Honda aren’t counteracting the shortage rumors, because that helps get people on the lots; everyone wants to have what their neighbors couldn’t get, even if they really hate the car.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        There are shortages in California markets. Maybe the demand for certain models is higher than the allocated quota, but shortages do exist. And that includes the made-in-America Hyundai Sonata and Toyota Camry. I don’t know about Honda. My relatives do not sell them in California.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        You can still buy a Corolla, Camry, Civic, Accord without a problem

        I don’t think that anyone claimed that these cars were impossible to get.

        If there really are so few of them, then why is the Camry still so heavily incentivized, for example?

        Toyota and Honda incentives are still well below the incentives of the domestics. I do hope that you realize that.

        I would agree that demand for these cars has also declined. But in your zeal to support Detroit, your understanding of the situation is also flawed.

        The situation is this: If Toyota and Honda were to compete on volume at this moment, then they would have to compete on price (increase incentives to the levels of the domestics) and/ or on fleet.

        Unlike the domestics, they aren’t willing to do that, because their brands are built on selling quality at a premium. They would rather maintain their price points, even if that means losing sales.

        And in any case, they couldn’t have done that during the second quarter, even if they had wanted to, because they were genuinely production constrained. So the mass discounting strategy was out of the question, regardless.

        The result is that the production declines were matched with their pricing strategy and the demand that follows that. Unfortunately for them, that benefits Hyundai, which has been positioning itself as the company that offers Toyota quality at bargain prices.

        Meanwhile, the domestics are building better cars and don’t mind selling them into fleet, which allows them to reduce their incentives (even though they are still high) while maintaining high volume. This differs from Hyundai, which seems happy to cut fleet now that the retail market has developed respect for its brands.

      • 0 avatar
        GarbageMotorsCo.

        The only “PR blitz” is the one being conducted by a fleet of paid internet trolls who are making the rounds on sites like this one, speading idiotic (and downright ignorant) rumors about the tsunami having little effect on car sales.

        It’s OK PF, I was one of them too. Made a pretty nice addition to my paycheck come bonus time.

        You wouldn’t to be my friend 1487 (Sheth) from C&G would you? Great to hear from you again!

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        @PCH:
        I would agree that Honda’s incentives are probably below that of the domestics, but about Toyota I’m not really sure. I recall seeing data that showed the Camry as about in the middle of the pack when it came to incentives. But even if these brands are indeed “built on selling quality at a premium,” then why do any incentives even exist at all? Especially if there is a genuine “shortage,” and there are a bunch of eager customers clamoring at the door? If the demand is really that high, and the supply that minimal, then the cars ought to sell themselves without any special deals. The truth is that there is no shortage (or only a very minimal one), and demand for these cars is a lot weaker than Toyota and Honda want you to think. And for the record, I don’t want to be perceived as a “Detroiter,” just someone that is very skeptical of both Honda and Toyota. I have no problems with the Koreans continuing to gain market share.

        @GarbageMotors:
        If you are really going to be so immature as to suggest that everyone who doesn’t toe the Honda/Toyota corporate line is a paid shill for some vast pro-domestic conspiracy, then I think that TTAC is a little bit much for you. Go find yourself a Civic Type R or Supra forum, I’m sure they’d be glad to have your well-reasoned input.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        I would agree that Honda’s incentives are probably below that of the domestics, but about Toyota I’m not really sure.

        Toyota’s incentives are consistently below those of the domestics and below the industry average. That being said, Toyota’s have been higher than they used to be, and the domestics have been reducing them.

        Mercedes-Benz / 4,147
        GM / 3,139
        BMW / 2,985
        Chrysler Group / 2,778
        Ford / 2,754
        Nissan / 2,442
        Industry / 2,384
        Mitsubishi / 2,295
        Mazda / 2,202
        Toyota / 2,202
        Geely / 1,734
        Honda / 1,624
        Kia / 1,504
        Suzuki / 1,442
        Audi / $1,261
        Hyundai / 854
        Volkswagen / 741
        Subaru / 467

        http://www.autoobserver.com/car-data-center/tci-true-cost-of-incentives/

        But even if these brands are indeed “built on selling quality at a premium,” then why do any incentives even exist at all?

        One word: Hyundai. Toyota didn’t have to compete on price when its only real competition was Honda, which also didn’t compete on price. Hyundai creates a new problem.

        And generally speaking, the competition has been closing the gap. For a company such as Toyota that doesn’t want to start competing primarily on price, the alternative is to give up on unit sales and market share in an effort to preserve per-unit margin.

        The result is to have some price cuts in the form of incentives that aren’t as aggressive as they could be if Toyota (a) wanted the volume (which it probably doesn’t) and (b) was capable of producing the volume (which, given the tsunami, it hasn’t been able to.)

        And for the record, I don’t want to be perceived as a “Detroiter,” just someone that is very skeptical of both Honda and Toyota.

        With a handle like that, that’s hard to believe. Sorry.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        PCH101 The Camry has one of the highest amounts of cash on the hood right now. In the thread about it’s segment a few days ago it showed it as around $4K about twice what was on the hood of the Fusion and more than 4 times what Hyundai was giving. Toyota intends to take the #1 selling car title even if they have to buy it.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        The Camry has one of the highest amounts of cash on the hood right now

        I know that the Detroit fan club likes to make such claims, but I’d like to see some proof of it.

        As far as incentives go, this is what is currently available according to Edmunds:

        2011 Camry — $1,000 factory to customer or 0% APR
        2012 Camry — N/A

        2011 Malibu — $2,500 factory to customer or 0% APR + $1,000 factory-to-dealer
        2012 Malibu — $1,500 factory to customer or 1.9% APR

        2011 Fusion — $1,000 factory to customer or 0% APR
        2012 Fusion — $500 factory to customer or 0% APR

        2011 Chrysler 200 — $2,000 factory to customer or 0% APR + $500 factory-to-dealer
        2012 Chrysler 200 — N/A

        http://www.edmunds.com/car-incentives/

        I don’t know where you get your facts, but every time you make a claim, I can’t confirm it and I end up finding information that contradicts it. This post of yours is no exception.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Here are the estimates from July as posted in the Bix 6 thread from last week.
        Camry $3693
        Accord $2330
        Altima $2313
        Fusion $2112
        Malibu $4341
        Sonata $793

        As for Current offers at least in my area Toyota is offering $1000 AND 0% for 60 plus and additional $500 grad or milatary bonus over the normal $500. Other and the $500 grad and military bump it’s been that way all year around here. Ford did just up the ante on the Fusion here in the last few weeks of the model year to $3K OR 0% for 60.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Here are the estimates from July as posted in the Bix 6 thread from last week.

        You must be joking.

        My source is Edmunds, which is a primary source for automotive industry incentives data.

        Your “source” is some anonymous internet poster, who provided no link or authoritative citation of any kind.

        I have absolutely no reason to rely upon an anonymous source that lacks any support. And if you’d care to know what you’re talking about, then neither do you.

        Incidentally, if you put that poster’s numbers into Google, you will find that they don’t show up anywhere else on the internet aside from that post on that thread. As far as I can tell, there is absolutely nothing to back them up.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      @Pinto Fan: I agree. What shortage? I have yet to see any dealer’s lot empty. Period. New, used, domestic or foreign, they got a lot of cars.

      If the demand were so strong for all of these cars, why would they need any incentives? On this board it was discussed about the amount of incentives on mid sized cars, all of the major Japanese players have some sort of incentive on the hood. There are no waiting lists for cars (unless were talking about special models) like there were in the malaise period.

      In my area (SWMI) we’ve got Toyota-thon commercials running every break in the local news reminding us about the great deals. Reminds me greatly of the so-called toe-tag sales that GM runs every so often.

      Look, when any of the local dealers run totally dry, I’ll believe there’s a shortage.

      The only shortage is of credit. That’s a whole different issue.

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        @geozinger: 100% agreed. Not one dealer around where I live is short of cars- there are acres and acres of them, just waiting for buyers. I forgot about the Toyotathon commercials- they’ve been running here too. Let’s not forget the dozens of 2011 Tundras that every dealer has sitting around, either. I remember that the same thing happened last year with Toyota trucks, too.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        @Pinto Fan: I guess what irks me is when people just repeat this ‘shortage’ garbage repeatedly. A friend of mine just bought a used car for his youngest. During our conversation, he reminded me about Cash for Clunkers and how many used cars it took out of the market. Another myth floating around as common knowledge…

        He bought a 175K mile 2003 Taurus SES with minor crash damage to the front passenger fender & headlight assembly, for $2100. If C4C had really made a dent in the used car market (in my area), I believe even that beater Taurus would have gone for a lot more.

        It may be where I live, but I just am not seeing a shortage in the conventional sense. If what HDC is true, maybe these West Coast dealers can trade with the ones here in the Midwest and get some inventory going? (I know that wouldn’t happen, far too expensive)

        Like I said before, when the local dealer (of any kind) has no cars to sell, I’ll believe the shortage exists.

    • 0 avatar
      GarbageMotorsCo.

      “The cars are there; people aren’t buying them.”

      And the number one selling car last month was?

      • 0 avatar
        alluster83

        There is a bigger story behind Camry coming in at Number 1,beating the Cruze which held the top spot in June and May. Camry sales were down by more than 20K in the previous two months, so there was a huge pent up demand for Camry’s when inventories grew. Also the Corolla and Prius were down by 10K and 7k resply, thus many buyers who could not find a corolla or prius would have bought Camry’s instead. All said the Camry was still down by 8K units compared to last July.

      • 0 avatar
        GarbageMotorsCo.

        The Snuze was not a top seller in May.

        http://blogs.cars.com/kickingtires/2011/06/top-10-best-selling-cars-may-2011.html

        Government Motors “Other” rental car was the top seller thanks to 6000 dollars on their hoods.

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        The Cruze is quite clearly listed as #8 on that chart, of all the best-selling vehicles (not sedans). So I guess you’ve progressed to openly lying now? If your demeaning of both the “Snuze” and the “Rentibu” at every turn doesn’t show the general angst of Toyhonda’s defenders, I don’t know what does.

      • 0 avatar
        GarbageMotorsCo.

        “The Cruze is quite clearly listed as #8 on that chart” is not “top spot”.

        What is “Openly lying” about that?

        Facts are right there buddy.

    • 0 avatar
      FleetofWheel

      “everyone wants to have what their neighbors couldn’t get, even if they really hate the car.”

      So absurd and untrue. Maybe a few WRX STi pampered teen buyers act that way.
      After all, the knock on the Camry and Corolla is that they are bland appliances sold in huge numbers to passionless drones.

    • 0 avatar
      alluster83

      Toyota and Honda do have a shortage of cars on their lots. However its not as bad as it gets portrayed. There are some models in severe short supply like the Prius, Civic, Yaris, Some Acura and Lexus Models. The demand for Japanese cars fell like a rock with perceived shortages and price increases. Most dealers have a good selection of cars and are adequately stocked. I mean its lower than pre-quake, but not low enough to explain the sales drops in May – July period.

      http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/MK-BO359_HONDA_NS_20110816152403.jpg

      Honda inventory has gone from 227K in Jan to 84K in July. Toyota from 340K in Jan to 172K in July.

      • 0 avatar
        GarbageMotorsCo.

        And dealers are not budging on price nor are they carrying the exact model and trimlines that customers want. Especially for Toyota who has a lot of V6′s on their lot when people are demanding 4-cylinders and cars like the Prius.

        Toyota also has Subaru building Camrys for them so I’m sure with the tsunami impact affecting their Subaru inventories, they are upping production numbers for the Camry which helped to bring the nameplate back to it’s number 1 selling status where it was pre-quake.

    • 0 avatar
      GarbageMotorsCo.

      .

      • 0 avatar
        GarbageMotorsCo.

        For a car that is meant to sell 10000 in an entire year, having 750 (and climbing)

        http://www.cars.com/go/search/newBuyIndex.jsp?stkTyp=N&tracktype=newcc&mkId=20053&AmbMkId=20053&AmbMkNm=Chevrolet&make=Chevrolet&AmbMdNm=Volt&model=Volt&mdId=35025&AmbMdId=35025&rd=100000&zc=23023&enableSeo=1

        of them still sittin on the lot is not a good sign buckwheat. And that’s including a 1 month shutdown so make that 11 months.

        Comparing the Volt sales to that of a perennial sales leaders like the Civic and Camry is a really poor argument. And your argument that sales of those models are down because of lack of demand rather than what actually DID happen?

        Might want to get back to bailing cause it’s got has so many holes in it it’s sinking…… fast.

    • 0 avatar
      GarbageMotorsCo.

      Great idea, this “whisper campaign”.

      You should forward that to Government Motors. They need help moving Volts which are supposedly “unavailable”

      http://www.cars.com/for-sale/searchresults.action?stkTyp=N&tracktype=newcc&mkId=20053&AmbMkId=20053&AmbMkNm=Chevrolet&make=Chevrolet&AmbMdNm=Volt&model=Volt&mdId=35025&AmbMdId=35025&rd=100000&zc=23023&enableSeo=1&searchSource=TRAIL_HEAD

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        Hmm, only 750 Volts across the country. Seems like a lot less than those Civics and Camrys nobody is buying. And what’s more, GM will sell every single one of those Volts at a premium- they won’t have to put cash on the hood, like Toyota will.

  • avatar
    spyked

    I think it’s a stupid commecial. This is America! We forgot about that earthquake months ago! All that commercial says to me is: Honda is sold out of cars. Nissan has plenty of them.

    Meaning – people want to buy Hondas so they are in short supply. Nissans on the other hand….

    Stupid commercials.

  • avatar
    sitting@home

    Does anyone these days make a new car buying decision based solely on what is on a dealer’s lot ? That sounds like a recipe for getting both ripped off and the wrong vehicle.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Shortage? I thought unzere borolla & civie came from Kanada?

    Plant tours in Smyma? Otto not good thing Nissan, folks will see car & mighty SUV stamped from ‘spindly,’ roll of carpet steel.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Funny thing when I was out on the road today I saw a car carrier up ahead and the vehicle on the rear of the top deck was a Pathfinder. Then I got up closer and what were the other cars? Not a single other Nissan but there were a bunch of Toyotas and some Mazdas. Later on as I was going to lunch what do I see but a 3 car carrier pulling into the Mitsubishi dealer, all were Mitsus.

    If you think that one is a low blow you should see the TV and radio adds running around here. It does focus on the model year close out and pimping Altima leases and $3K off of Maximas, but they clearly say with better availability than Honda or Nissan. The one above isn’t as bad as they only say that they are running at 100% unlike “some” others. Of course there is the small print stating they are referring to Honda and Toyota and the sighing salesman with the H and A behind him.

    Personally I have no problem with the ads. For the one posted above, lots of non-car type people don’t really know that all mfgs weren’t about equally affected. In the local one however they don’t say that they are running at 100% so you could also easily interpret it to mean “Hey our lots are over stocked because every one wants a Toyota or Honda and not ours so we’ve giving them away”.

  • avatar

    Here’s the actual inventory situation, as of this week:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111904253204576512561127443314.html


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