By on July 18, 2011

Once issued a challenge to write a novel in just six words, Ernest Hemingway famously produced, “For sale: baby shoes, never used.” Well that’s a bit depressing. No wonder he shot himself. It’s rumoured that Hemingway considered this snippet his best work. Get ready to eat your heart out Papa Bear, ’cause I can sum up the Mazda2 in one syllable: “Wheeee!”

Eh? Hmm, seems that’s not good enough for our Editor. But wait, there’s more!

Mazda’s current design language has taken a bit of stick for transforming the once-handsome ’3 into a grinning buffoon that ought to be available in a rich purple colour called “Why So Serious?” Just as it’s being shown the door, here comes a car that Nagare seems to fit: this little hatch is cute and it works.

Particularly in green, the Mazda2 resembles some kind of anime aphid. Not surprisingly, at least to me, this iridescent-beetle shade of paint is far and away the best-selling, no doubt for its stand-out qualities and sense of fun. The swooping lines and – for such a small car – relatively large wheels add a dollop of go-fast appeal. The smirking grille seems to be snickering at its cousin, the gawp-mouthed Fiesta. No wonder: at just 2306 pounds, the ’2 is nearly ten percent lighter than the Ford.
Step inside though and fun time is over. The interior of the Mazda2 is about as playful as a textbook on tax law and as austere as a Calvinist’s underpants drawer. No armrest, dour switchgear, swathes of black plastic: it’s like a Rubbermaid funeral parlour.

There’s also a bit of cheapness. Painted metal peeps through the incompletely-covered back hatch and, this being the sporty GX (Touring) model, there’s some red seat-piping that appears to have been appropriated off a ski-jacket from Hot Tub Time Machine. The rough plastic seams in the door panels look like Mazda is pre-empting the inevitable cheap BYD knock-off.

Still, everything’s where it should be. The driving position feels like it was set up for, well, driving. Forward visibility is good with little of the A-pillar blind-spots that are the plague of the segment; ditto for shoulder-checking. The gear-shift is console-mounted which won’t overjoy every driver but in the time-honoured hackneyed phraseology of Tom McCahill, it “falls easily to hand”. The centre-stack’s simple layout means you need not hunt for buttons to quickly flick the radio station while keeping your eyes on the road.

Again, this being the highline GX (Touring) model, there are several extras as-standard including automatic headlights, rain-sensing wipers and redundant controls on the steering wheel. In an increasingly well-equipped and competitive segment, the lack of Bluetooth handsfree is a strong box to leave unchecked, but frankly, I feel the ’2 would better suit an even more basic model as all the safety equipment and most of the power group is standard anyway.

We’ve moved recently, so the Mazda2 was put through its haulage paces with frequent trips to IKEA and the like. Admittedly, it’s no Honda Fit, but the space was adequate enough for lamps and tables and chairs. Rear seat space is not going to be extra-comfy for adult passengers as it would in a Versa. Mind you, you’re not going to want to load this car up with people or heavy stuff anyway.

And here’s why: the Mazda2 accelerates like a small dog attached to a fat person by one of those retractable leads. With only 100hp on tap and peak torque coming in at lofty 4000 rpm, the ’2 was never going to be a barn burner. Still, as the hatch buzzes energetically off the line in first gear, you can’t help thinking, “Well, it is pretty light…” And then you shift into second and fall into a power vacuum from which even the most energetic flooring provides only a molasses-slow escape.

However, once the yappy terrier finally overcomes the initial inertia of Obesity McButterpants, you discover that there’s a simple solution to the limited motivating power of the 1.5L. Flog the absolute bejesus out of the thing.

Here then, the Mazda2 transforms into the proverbial Great Little Car. The steering is so quick, light and responsive that even though the 100hp under your foot is a bit asthmatic from a dead stop, the ’2 is all too eager to ‘scuse-me-pardon-me its way through lumbering traffic like a meerkat jumping the queue for the Ark. You may be the least powerful thing on the road but suddenly, everyone is In Your Way.

It’s weird, but this bonkers freneticism extends even to the highway, where you’d think the Mazda2′s feeble powerplant and vulnerability to crosswinds would be insurmountable obstacles to pleasant motoring. Not a bit of it. At one point I found myself blazing along in the wake of a BMW M6, a car with five times the horsepower of the little green hatch. Was the big Bimmer’s pilot in command of a car that could flick me into the weeds with the tiniest of teutonic shrugs? Undoubtedly. Was he more engaged with his car than I was? The jury remains out.

And another thing, the whole “light as a feather, stiff as a board” crashy ride of small cars seems to have been given the slip by Mazda’s engineers. The ’2 can be a little unhappy over washboard situations and it does tend to pogo about with harsh steering and braking inputs (harsh throttle inputs? Don’t be silly), but it’s quite smooth overall.
So it’s cheap and cheerful and kinda slow, but still excellent fun to thrash. The Mazda rep I spoke to seemed a bit bemused about the car’s success; it’s selling at effectively twice the rate they had apparently expected. Obviously those searching for more comfort and power are going to look very hard at a Fiesta. Those wanting sheer passenger volume would do well to peruse a Versa catalogue and the mountain-bike crowd needs to pop in to see Honda.

But for the enthusiast with the project RX-7 that’s constantly in pieces, a Mazda2 is worth a good hard look as a daily driver. Whether its handling superiority is going to outweigh the power shortfall is going to be decided on a case-by-case basis. I’ll say this though: if they manage to bump power output by ten to fifteen percent (SKYACTIV-G?) it’ll be a no-brainer.

Mazda provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review.

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76 Comments on “Review: 2011 Mazda2 Take Two...”


  • avatar
    Terry

    I prefer driving the 2 over the 3. The interior is quite roomy, and the ride/handling/steering reminds me of my Miata.
    And to date–at our dealership–absolutely ZERO problems with the car.

  • avatar
    James2

    The current powertrain reminds me of my 1986 Mazda 323′s: eager but slow. The new SkyActiv stuff can’t come soon enough.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadInSideInc

      Sounds like it. I grew up driving a 1.5L mid-90s Protege with 95hp and a 5spd. Flog it and it will go, just turn off the AC if you want to pass someone in the summer.

      No tach, no power windows, no power door locks, but teenager proof and able to teach the limits of safe car control.

  • avatar
    jj99

    Does this car share Ford’s PowerShiftmaggedon transmission used in the Fiesta?

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    Can’t wait for the new engine. (Or an aftermarket turbocharger (or supercharger) for the orginal engine.) This car seems like it would be as much fun in the handling department without the Mini/BMW price premium.

  • avatar
    Philosophil

    Any guesses as to whether the 2 is likely to have the same kinds of rust issues as the 3 and others?

    • 0 avatar
      Lemmy-powered

      Fair question. I first noticed the cancer several years ago on Protege 5s, then on my ’01 Miata, and now it’s sprouting on many of the first-gen 3s around here.

      Looks safe to say that Mazda’s been having rust issues.

    • 0 avatar

      I’m aware of Mazdas’ rust issues from both responses to TrueDelta’s Car Reliability Survey and from my own Protege5. Until proven otherwise, I think the Mazda2 will likely have the same problem. So expect rust after 5-6 years where the roads are salted.

      Not enough Mazda2s signed up yet to include them in the survey. To help with the survey, with this or just about any car:

      http://www.truedelta.com/reliability.php

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Probably, but if you’re judicious with rustproofing it’ll be fine. I had a Protege5 (and lived in the salt belt) and didn’t notice any trouble, to which I credit taking it to Krown every year. I know a couple people with Mazda5s who do the same and are similarly rust-free.

      Frankly, if you live where salt is used, you should do this anyway. Mazdas are worse than average in this respect, but it’s really a matter of time before any car is eaten alive.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    the Mazda2 accelerates like a small dog attached to a fat person by one of those retractable leads.

    My new favorite way to describe a slow-accelerating vehicle, supplanting a description I once read that the Honda S2000 “doesn’t have the torque to pull the skin off a bowl of pudding”.

    The line about darting around “like a meerkat jumping the queue for the Ark” is pretty dang funny, too.

  • avatar
    Marko

    As others have mentioned, this is a good car saddled with a mediocre powertrain. Fortunately, it seems like Mazda is aware of this and is planning to offer the SkyActiv powertrain in this car. Does anyone know when SkyActiv will make it to the US?

    The whole subcompact segment is heating up these days in a way it wasn’t just a few years ago…

    • 0 avatar
      Philosophil

      From what I remember, the new SkyActiv engine for the Mazda 2 will only be released in Asia for 2012, so you’re probably going to have to wait until 2013 to see it in North America.

      The first SkyActive engine for North America will be in the Mazda 3 later this fall, and we’ll see the first entire SkyActive system (engine, transmission, lightweight structure and so on) in the upcoming CX-5, again likely later this fall.

    • 0 avatar
      Les

      I just hope if/when they do give it the power-boost they don’t ruin it by thinking they’re now obligated to stuff it to the gills with all kinds of electronic doo-hickery instead of leaving it plain and simple like it is.

  • avatar
    KitaIkki

    The photos appear to show the low-end model: Plastic wheel covers. No steering wheel mounted controls. No red piping on seats.

  • avatar
    mrhappypants

    Let’s hope Mazda soon offers satellite radio and/or bluetooth streaming with that SkyActiv engine, because a nimble chassis can only do so much for your sanity in California rush hour gridlock. Otherwise, a Fiat 500 is mighty tempting, particularly with some Abarth bits.

  • avatar
    WheelMcCoy

    >> No armrest, dour switchgear, swathes of black plastic: it’s like a Rubbermaid funeral parlour

    Nice write-up. Hemingway would approve… maybe. TTAC readers for sure :)

  • avatar
    joeveto3

    I had an 88 Mercury Tracer / Mazda 323. It was marine blue (dark blue) with a light blue interior. The mazda 1.6 combined with the 5-speed manual made for a wonderful car to finish off high school and take to college. I put over 100,000 very happy miles on that car, and to this day, have a picture in my office of me kissing the hood the moment it crossed the 100K threshold. I took care of it and I imagine it would have easily gone another 100K, had my fiance not killed it while fixing her make-up.

    I see every bit of the 323 in the Mazda 2, and it appears to have a bit of whimsy where the Mazda 3 has “all grown up.” If I needed a car such as this (and didn’t already have a Miata and a Fit Sport in our stable), I’d run out and buy one in blue.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Until the new train arrives I think 2 sales will labor in the shadow of 2012 Accent.

  • avatar
    spyked

    Japanese car perfection. Priced right. Equipped correctly. Does exactly what it’s supposed to do and doesn’t try to compete in other segments.

    Honestly reminds me of my 82 Tercel 5speed and 93 323 5speed hatch. Great cars that you couldn’t kill that couldn’t get out of their own way but you just didn’t care!

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      Yeah, it also reminds me of our 1997 Tercel..simple and virtually indestructible…cars like that are sorely missing from our landscape but so much fun.

  • avatar
    threeer

    If I were replacing my 2004 Lancer Sportback Ralliart, I’d seriously still consider this…in 5 speed. Reminds me of my sister’s GLC…simple, light and willing to be flogged. With the SkyActiv powertrain option coming, maybe in a year or two I will…

  • avatar
    ciddyguy

    It almost looks like the photos were cribbed from an earlier Mazda 2 report that came out here on TTAC though I could be wrong.

    Nice write up and you verify what others have said about this engine, though at only 100HP, the power curve is definitely lacking and seems to run out of breath easily, unlike the Fiat’s 101HP 1.4 which never seems to run out of breath and just goes and goes and goes.

  • avatar
    potatobreath

    Is the centre stack wide in the Mazda2? I don’t know why, but my knee keeps banging into the centre stack in the Mazda2 but not in the Fiesta. I like the styling of the Mazda2 better than the Fiesta, since the Fiesta reminds me of a bathtub on wheels.

    • 0 avatar
      potatobreath

      I figured it out yesterday night. The centre stack feels much wider because of the dash mounted shifter. The Fiesta’s shifter is down on the floor.

  • avatar
    Strippo

    Apparently I would have to drive 200 miles from ATL to find a new one with the stick.

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      And give the love of average non-enthusiast Americans for manual transmissions that does not suprize me at all.

      • 0 avatar
        Strippo

        Not many slushboxes left, either. The new 3 with the skyactiv is probably a better bet for my long commute anyway, if I can wait that long.

      • 0 avatar
        mazder3

        @Strippo

        If you’re just going by dealer websites, you might want to give your nearest dealer a call. My local dealer’s website lists only red and grey auto equipped 2s but I checked out a stick-equipped green 2 with really nice red piping on the seats on the dealer’s showroom floor not 14 hours ago (1200 miles away, sorry).

  • avatar
    CraigSu

    So there’s no MazdaSpeed2 version in the pipeline?

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    If I were shopping for a fun, inexpensive, and fuel-efficient commuter would you suggest the Mazda2 or the Fiat 500?

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      Drive both, see what you like. Although depending where you live you might be closer to a Mazda dealer than a Fiat dealer.

      • 0 avatar
        stevelovescars

        That’s my challenge, the nearest Fiat dealer is about an hour away, plus, a 10-minute test drive is little substitute for someone who has spent a week or so with a test car.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        On the other hand, if I had to choose a car, I’d take a hard ten minute test drive over any quantity of others’ reviews and opinions. Not to say that they don’t have value. I do like to read credible reviews in addition to my test drives, and it’s good to stir up a discussion even if you’re not at the point where you want to put a bunch of effort into analyzing it yourself first.

        But why would you be limited to only a ten minute test drive, anyway?

    • 0 avatar

      The Mazda2 handles better, while the FIAT is much more stylish and doesn’t seem as cheap. Both are slow.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        Both have around 100hp, I dunno why that’d be so low nowadays though. My 3 speed Horizon has hp in the upper 90′s and it takes off when you floor it.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    Still, as the hatch buzzes energetically off the line in first gear, you can’t help thinking, “Well, it is pretty light…” And then you shift into second and fall into a power vacuum from which even the most energetic flooring provides only a molasses-slow escape.

    Good one! I feel the same way about my Mazda3, though in reality it’s probably not nearly as bad. Very peppy in first, which revs out at about 37 mph. Then second gear comes alive at around 50 mph. Why does second need to go all the way to 68 mph? It’s annoying at lower speeds too, where second gear is higher than ideal for crawling on busy streets and parking lots, or for making California stops. It also sucks on our small local track that’s not fast enough for me to get out of second, yet too slow for me to get anywhere near the power peak. I’ve never been able to figure out why they designed it this way. If they wanted to spec it for EPA testing, they’d have made 1st much taller, and probably 3rd, 4th, and 5th as well, so that’s not the answer. Second gear is barely even used on the EPA test. If they wanted a quicker 0-60 time, they’d have it rev out right at 61. Aaaaaaarrrrrrgh! I’ve had this car for seven years and this particular detail annoys me every time I think about it!

  • avatar
    Sinistermisterman

    Great review Brendan. Had me snickering to myself about the meerkat.
    Having recently been shopping for a new small car (and ended up with something completely different), I stopped in at my local Mazda dealer to take a look. To my surprise one of the salesmen just threw me a set of keys to a base model and said “have fun for half an hour.”
    That I did.
    Having grown up with weeny little under-powered, stick shift hatchbacks in the UK, this car immediately reminded me of them.
    Like you say, thrash the hell out of it for maximum rewards – it truly is a chuckable little car. My wife was less than pleased when I started doing reverse donuts and handbrake turns in the local Walmart parking lot – but it’s the kind of car which turns you into a teenager again.
    I handed the keys back and I could see the salesman smile when he noticed the smell of hot rubber and brakes emanating from the little car. “It’s fun isn’t it?” He said.
    Oooh yes.

  • avatar
    Ronman

    I’ve owned a 2 for 3 years, Zero problems and 100 percent good fun even when driving slowly on the twisties, no other hatch in that segment and price point is so rewarding and worth the money.

    Sadly I’m selling it cause of relocation, and it’s cheaper to buy a new one where I’m going and keep some on my money in the pocket. but i will miss the 2…

    the interior is a little harsh, but that pays off in terms of durability and ease of maintenance, something important in an everyday car. controls are to the point as they should be…in any case, the 2′s USP is that it’s lightweight, and offers u just what you need, but then again the 2011 model got bloated with a few extra kilos kind of a buzz-kill.

    there is a three door version being sold in Australia, and i think in other right hand drive countries. i would love to see how it would go with the MPS’ shifter and a turbocharged 1.6, say 160 horses and about 180Nm+ of Torque, that would be the ultimate Japanese Hot hatch…

  • avatar
    Canuck129

    “The rough plastic seams in the door panels look like Mazda is pre-empting the inevitable cheap BYD knock-off.”

    A review well done, and a great line!

  • avatar
    vww12

    looks like a Kia.

    • 0 avatar
      tankinbeans

      Is this good or bad? I’m honestly curious. I have a Kia and think it looks pretty good, for a relatively inexpensive car, but my opinion is just that, my opinion. Granted I went with the Forte over the Rio (not a fan of the Rio’s looks), so that may have an effect.

  • avatar
    Bryce

    Ill stay with my Citroen Xsara takes a pretty special car to out corner a Xsara and still be comfortable to drive.

  • avatar

    Gentlemen. And possibly ladies.

    Thanks for the kind words of encouragement. In response to what questions there were, the photos are cribbed from Michael Karesh’s review of the ’2. Why? Because forgot to take pictures. I’m off to check out some SKYACTIV stuff next week and there’ll apparently be some mules to drive. I’ll try to weasel it out of them whether or not they’re going to stuff the new tech in the ’2 as well as the ’3.

    In the meantime, check out Autobarn Mazda’s Mazdaspeed2 build. These are the guys who showed up with a Mazdaspeed5 at One Lap of America.

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      Gosh you mean for only $55,000? http://www.mazdaguys.com/vehicledetailsvin.aspx?vin=JM1DE1HY8B0110168&vehicle=2011-Mazda-MAZDA2-Sport&Extc=

      Good Lord! I’d prefer a “power adder” for the current engine over a complete swap.

      • 0 avatar

        That’s way too much engine anyway. Not sure how a JRSC would bolt on, but the cost… well, it’s probably about the same as swapping in the ’3s 2.0, which is all Mazda has to do to make a Speed2. Oh, and suspension.

    • 0 avatar
      Demetri

      The Sky engines are going to be in everything Mazda sells (with the possible exception of a rotary in a new RX car), it’s just a matter of when. Mazda has already started selling a Skyactiv version of the Mazda2 in Japan, but it’s a 1.3L model that that only puts out 83 HP, so it has almost no chance of being sold in this market, even with it being rated at 30km/l. The 1.5L engine in the 2012MY Japanese lineup is a carryover, so don’t expect an engine upgrade this year. The Mazda2 is scheduled for a full model change for MY2013, which is probably when we will see Sky engines across the whole lineup and in all markets.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    The 2 has an advantage over the similar Fiesta with its questionable dual clutch, nightmarish tranny, I’d much prefer the Mazda’s four unless you go for the stick.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Perhaps I missed it, but did you manage to get some real world mileage numbers? After all most who are going to buy this will be looking for good fuel mileage.

    • 0 avatar

      This is a “take-two” so I tried to focus more on the spirit of the car, rather than the numbers. It’s rated at 29/35, and translating from the Canadian units (mukluks per furlong) I got about 30ish mixed. Honestly, it’s about the same as everything else in the class, although a taller final drive would be nice if it was a highway commuter.

      • 0 avatar
        tankinbeans

        Fair enough. Sometimes small details get lost on me. It’s been awhile since I read the first one. <:)

      • 0 avatar
        nikita

        Wishing for a taller final drive, or a sixth gear, is the only thing I can find wanting in my Honda Fit. 27/33mpg is easily exceeded with the manual trans. If the 2 was available then, I would have considered it, especially given the lower price for a gen-u-ine made in Japan car.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Why does this thing have FOUR doors? The rear doors look like an after thought, they don’t flow with the rest of the car. Mazda already has the 3 for buyers that need more room. Drop the rear doors, save some weight and learn from Honda’s mistake by giving the engine more torque. I had a ’85 Honda Civic hatch with all of 95HP, it was a zippy little thing (back then) provided you kept the revs up by using the silk smooth 5 speed manual. A car like this with a 4 speed auto would be a dog… like old yeller begging to be put down.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    I agree this is the one Mazda where the crazy smile actually works. Every time I see a 3 I want to slap that grin off it’s face. I can forgive Mazda the Rubbermaid interior, but no bluetooth? For heaven’s sake, Kia has had it standard in the Rio since 2008 and you can find it in $200 aftermarket stereos. Quit playing games Mazda, and while you’re at it put a decent motor in this thing.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    OP: “the Mazda2 accelerates like a small dog attached to a fat person by one of those retractable leads…”

    Hey! HEY! I may resemble that simile.

    The fat person part.

    The small dog is played by my small dog, Elli.

  • avatar
    ciddyguy

    Commenting again but when I was first interested in this car a year ago, it was against the Fiat, the Fiesta and the Kia Soul, so far I’ve had the opportunity to test drive the Fiesta (liked even with the DSG manumatic) liked the looks of the Soul but have not test driven it and have since dropped the Mazda for it lacks just too many things like Bluetooth and a proper semi modern autobox as this thing has a 4 speed when it should have AT LEAST a 5spd autobox, the Fiat, the Soul (I think) and the Fiesta all have 6spds autos which then makes the Mazda2 a bit behind the times tech wise but at least you DO get a USB/Aux jack though but without bluetooth handsfree for the phone etc, a no go, even the base Fiat now has Bluetooth (didn’t initially though) although it only has a 5spd manual (but most of the others do too) but that’s due to the mere fact that their 6spd would not fit after mods for the US were factored in, otherwise we’d have gotten the 6spd manual here as well.

    Also, the write ups seem to indicate the motor in the 2 lacks a sufficient power band curve so it runs out of breath between 1st and 2nd gears so it may WELL feel even slower than in the Fiat with a smidge more HP but never seems to run out of breath in any way, shape or form and redlines very high to boot so it doesn’t feel nearly as pokey as it could but rather is quite zippy so with a more modern autobox, a better motor that doesn’t run out of breath and a bit more features, the 2 could be a more worthy contender than it is, though it seem to sell well enough, along with the Fiesta, the Focus and the Soul too.

    In the end, I want the Fiat.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Ciddy, can’t help you with the Fiat, but here, have some periods: ……..
      I liked your post, but good god, man, take a breath!

      • 0 avatar
        ciddyguy

        Sorry about that Russycle…

        I sometimes get going too fast and my thoughts mush together with a whole lotta commas and fail to go back and re-read for grammar. :-}

    • 0 avatar
      Les

      I tested a Fiat 500 and loved it, then I asked about how hard it is to maintain outside of dealership service.

      That’s when I found out the Fiat 500 uses proprietary filters and so can only be serviced at the dealerships.. or rather, the ‘Studios’.

      • 0 avatar
        ciddyguy

        Les,

        That may be true right now as the car has JUST come out on the market and is a brand new model/marque to the US and Canada.

        A brief Google search shows the car IS listed at Reilly’s, AutoZone and a local NW auto company (originally from Portland Or), Baxter’s and Napa but not any filters as yet or much in the way of parts.

        I don’t know if the oil filter is literally proprietary or not in a literal sense, but you SHOULD be able to get the filters and do it yourself eventually. In fact, one reader/owner over on the Fiat500USA forum did just that and even showed the results.

        He had to get the filters from Motor Village in LA (as this was a couple of months ago) and they were roughly $11.25 each and look like a pleated paper filer that fits in a canister that you unscrew using a 27mm socket, once you remove the air filter box to gain easy access (it’s held on by 3 screws/bolts) and remove the cover from the bottom of the motor via 6 bolts and you have pretty good access to the oil filter for such a small car.

        My guess is give it time and you can get the filters at your local auto parts stores as they DO list the Fiat on their websites but no filters as yet. Most of the initial dealers are just now opening after it taking MUCH longer for building permits to be granted and construction could begin.

        I would not be surprised if you can buy parts such as filters as early next year. Napa shoes wiper blades ARE available for the car already at the very least and there are companies dedicated to the Fiat 500 and I’m sure you can get parts from them like the oil filters online, 500 Madness, Midwest Bayless being two that have a plethora of parts, both Euro and domestically sourced for the Fiat 500.

        If you want coco mats, the company that makes the originals sells a set that fits the 500, just to give you an example of people making stuff for the car already. You can buy aftermarket wheels for the car and companies are clamoring to make the official 98×4 bolt pattern Fiat’s been using for decades and you CAN get wobble bolts and spacers to use 100×4 standard bolt pattern wheels on your Fiat if you wish.

        Again, give it time. The car has JUST hit critical mass and parts WILL be available soon.

      • 0 avatar
        Les

        I may have been mistaken then, my apologies.

  • avatar
    SecretAznMan

    Mazda needs the SkyActiv in this car ASAP. If you’re going to have slow performance, you better get 50 MPG. Then offer a 145 hp Speed model for those who can live with the current 35 MPG. Mazda needs a home run not a double.

  • avatar
    VanillaDude

    Where do you drive?
    Do you drive in a downtown city most of the time?
    If you do, then you should go with the Mazda 2.

    If you drive anywhere else, drive a Fiesta.
    The Ford is a better highway cruiser and commuter car.
    The Mazda is a better urban car.

  • avatar
    Jaynen

    Still want the mazdaspeed version

  • avatar
    Serj

    I’d be very interested in driving one of these as I’ve already done a fiesta hatch and a 500. I ADORED the 500. it’s funky, refined, feels and drives spirited, and was much roomier than i anticipated (at least in the driver’s seat) the Fiesta 5-door was much of the same, except the OMGBUTTONS version of Sync and the fact that BOTH my thighs were touching BOTH the door and the side of the center console kinda killed it for me. I’d actually still go for it if there wasn’t a Fiat dealership right down the road with pretty much anything i want RIGHT on the lot. based on what I’m hearing here, it seems like the real picks in the segment would be the 500 or the Fit. Fit if you need the space, and the 500 if you can trade the space for a refined and funky ride. I was geek’d enough about the Fiat that i was seriously contemplating how I’d squeeze 2 carseats in the back and live with the lack of cargo room. EVEN NOW, after buying a full-size sedan.

    • 0 avatar
      Les

      As before, the Fiat is not the car for anyone who is the sort to want their car serviced by anyone outside of the dealership. I know where I live there’s still the lingering feeling of ‘Dealer-service = Ripoff’.

      • 0 avatar
        ciddyguy

        Quit going by your neighbors etc and do the research on the Fiat. The studios are off shoots for the most part from Chryco dealerships as a stand alone Fiat/Alfa Romeo dealership.

        And I’ve read good stories of studios bending over backwards to make things right when something DOES go wrong.

        You WILL have to get beyond what was true 30 years ago and go check them out.

        I’m looking to buy one myself before long.

  • avatar
    Les

    Nearest Chrysler/Dodge/etc.. dealership is over an hour’s drive away from me, nearest Fiat ‘Studio’ is almost twice that distance, and anyway any car company that bases part of it’s business model on trying to make their dealerships the only source for maintenance and repairs is a company I’m inherently suspicious of… especially in this segment.


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