By on July 25, 2011

Today is the day when the Japanese majors announce domestic and global data for June and the half year. A little more than three months ago, a massive earthquake, followed by a devastating tsunami, paralyzed much of Japan’s infrastructure. It could not have come at a more inopportune time. The Japanese auto industry was already suffering from weak markets at home and abroad, paired with a rising yen that destroyed profits from exports.  Three months later, how big was the hit?

Japanese and overseas output, June

Manufacturer Domestic Change Overseas Change Exports Change

Toyota
Group
320,452 -12.6% 360,516 3.3% 135,254 -20.2%

Nissan
102,390 1.9% 317,441 25.0% 75,901 25.0%

Suzuki
75,475 -22.9% 121,703 -9.3% 18,919 -23.0%

Honda
43,289 -50.6% 125,084 -42.1% 12,561 -60.2%

Mazda
80,114 -2.3% 33,672 1.2% 72,293 3.0%


Mitsubishi
59,069 8.1% 47,198 25.3% 47,096 25.5%

In June, the Japanese car industry was still battling the effects of the tsunami. However, it had global consequences.

Global output June and YTD

Manufacturer June global Change YTD global Change

Toyota
Group
680,968 -7.9% 3,375,692 -22.5%

Nissan
419,831 18.5% 2,114,745 11.1%

Suzuki
197,178 -15.0% 1,360,345 -5.0%

Honda
168,373 -44.5% 1,302,707 -27.7%

Mazda
113,786 -1.3% 548,026 -13.6%


Mitsubishi
106,267 15.1% 585,526 4.4%
Total 1,686,403 -8.2% 9,287,041 -13.1%

Globally, the Japanese auto industry lost 13.1 percent of its output in the first half year of 2011, compared to the same period in 2010. Not all of this goes on account of the disaster, the industry had been in a downdraft before. However, the Japanese majors made 1.4 million fewer cars from January to June 2011 than in the first half of 2010.

Company-wise, Toyota was hardest hit in raw numbers. Being the world’s largest automaker with half of its capacity in Japan, Toyota is the biggest target.

Surprisingly, Honda took the highest percentage hit.  One thought that with only a quarter of its worldwide production in Japan, Honda would have been spared the worst. But this wasn’t the case. When parts and components are missing, overseas plants stand idle.  Toyota also recovers faster. Honda is still 44.5 percent below June 2010

Very surprisingly, Nissan survived more or less unscathed and could raise its half year output by  11.1 percent. Nissan was better diversified, and plain lucky. If its engine plant in Iwaki would be a few miles closer to Fukushima than it already is, Nissan would not look so good.  Now, 2011 could become the defining year for Nissan. Nissan has big plans for emerging markets, especially Asia. Some of its plans will be released tomorrow in Beijing. We’ll be there.

 

Data have been compiled from individual manufacturer releases. Some links require registration.


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