By on May 11, 2011

Facebook has spoken, ladies and gentlemen, and it has decided that the automobile formerly known as “Mustang V6 Performance Package” shall be known as the “Mustang Mayhem V6″. Be sure to tell your insurance adjuster. I suppose “Ford ‘Blood In Tha Streetz’ V6″ was taken.

As fate would have it, we have a “Mayhem” in the metaphorical TTAC garage right now, and it’s leaving for the twisty “Shenandoah” course at Summit Point where we drove its V8 equivalent last year. I’ve only driven it thirty-four miles so far, but I’m smitten already. This is a fast, if not particularly furious, budget ponycar and when you consider that it costs $25,995, the case only gets stronger.

If only Ford didn’t have a little problem… and, naturally, it involves China.

I always get a little nervous when one of my driving students shows up with a C6 Z06, because the ultra-lightweight wheels on that car are made by “Amcast”. Of course, “Amcast” wheels are made in China, the same way the “Chicago Tools” air compressor and “Pittsburgh Products” wrenches you bought at Harbor Freight were made in China. At one hundred and fifty miles per hour, I’d prefer that I be sitting on rolling stock of known quality. To be fair, however, “Amcast” wheels are not known for failure.

If only the same could be said for the Getrag-designed manual transmission that Ford is using in the current Mustang. It’s also made in China and it’s apparently breaking left and right. I don’t like Getrag transmissions anyway — give me a Tremec TR-6060, as found in the GT500 variants — because they are occasionally junk even when they are made in the good old Fatherland. Add Chinese manufacturing to the mix, and it’s no wonder that owners are reporting multiple, diverse failures. What’s Ford thinking? If there is any group in this country known for being hard on transmissions, it’s Mustang owners. What would be the extra cost of using the American transmission? Five hundred bucks? A thousand?

In any event, if you want to shift your new “Mayhem” yourself, I’d recommend a combination of granny-shifting and double-clutching… and I’d recommend showing your insurance agent the window sticker for the car, which will continue to use the value-neutral term “Performance Package”.

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98 Comments on “Ford’s V-6 Pony “Saddled” With Stupid New Name...”


  • avatar
    drzombie

    Jack, do you know if the V8 also comes with a Getrag transmission made in China?

    • 0 avatar
      Sgt Beavis

      Yes it has the same transmission and GT owners are reporting the same problems.

      If only the 6speed auto came with the twin clutch and paddle shifters.

      Of course I also like Jack’s suggestion that they use the Tremec TR-6060.

  • avatar
    NotFast

    As a new C6Z06 owner who wants to do track days, you have me scared. Thanks for adding to my pile of neuroses.

  • avatar
    stryker1

    “Be sure to tell your insurance adjuster. I suppose “Ford ‘Blood In Tha Streetz’ V6″ was taken.”

    And that’s why I read TTAC.

    This gets at a question I had. Is the new V6 Mustang, even with 300hp, still a poser-mobile? It sounds like no. I am really itching to get into a 2011 or 2012 Mustang, and have been turning this question over in my head.

    It sounds like it might be wise to wait until 2013 and see if we get a better transmission…

  • avatar

    Aaaand Class-Action Lawsuit in

    5… 4… 3… 2… 1…

    Good thing Congress is killing that Consumer Protection Bureau, when this enters arbitration, all anyone will get is a $2 coupon off the purchase of their next new Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      Contrarian

      Meh, class action lawsuits benefit the lawyers and that’s about it.

      “Here’s your $7 coupon toward your next Ford”.

      • 0 avatar
        stryker1

        Well, it’s also possible that they could get “Warranty on manual transmission extended by X thousand miles.”

      • 0 avatar

        It’ll be the last replacement transmission you ever get, extended warrenty or not. And after you ditch the car, some unlucky person wil buy it with a failing transmission in it.
        My local Ford dealer already has two “repaired” 5 litre GTs on the used car lot. I pity the poor fool who ends up with one of those. And the original owner, who undoubtedly lost lots of money from the numerous repair days it took, hiring a lemon law lawyer, rental cars, and depreciation.
        This is so typical for Ford. Don’t forget the T-45 debacle, where in 1996 when it was introduced nearly very one failed (that is, the ones driven enthusiastically, which voids the warrenty) with loss of synchros. That is when they weren’t over-heating, before that recall that replaced the entire cooling system. I went thru that, too, and shouldn’t have gone any further with Ford then.
        Ford engineers Mustangs you really want to buy. But owning them quickly does downhill.
        -Jeff
        DrivingEnthusiast.net

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    Mayhem is probably better than the new Dodge “Speed Doesn’t Kill, I Do” V6 Charger.

  • avatar
    talkstoanimals

    Jack, if one were interested in getting a ride along around the track with you in the Mustang this weekend, where and when should he line up at Summit Point?

    Anyhow, as you allude to, I’m not so sure it’s just the Chinese supplied transmissions that are a problem. The good ole ‘Murican made Tremec in my ’10 Mustang GT failed, as did the clutch slave cylinder, as did the clutches in the LSD. And I wasn’t even particularly hard on it – never even did a burnout with the thing.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I will be offering ride-alongs four times a day from 9am to 4pm at Summit Point’s Shenandoah Circuit, both Saturday and Sunday. Just show up, sign the waiver (admission IS FREE!) and look for the red Mustang with Michigan tags. I can take a total of about 20 people around the track which should be far more than the 3 or 4 who normally show up for this stuff.

      However, I will also drop you a line tonight with my contact info.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Wow, what a misleading headline, Jack. Looking at the pix, I was thinking this was another story about autoxing, instead it’s a rant about the new (admittedly douchbag-ish) name and the real crux of the matter, the defective transmissions.

    That’s a bummer about the trans, as I really like the concept of the V6 Mustang not being a secretary’s car anymore and offering the performance goodies without the super de-dooper V8 engine. This will serve us well in the coming years, as motor fuel will not go down much in price, at least like the 80’s and 90’s did. I also hope that GM and Mopar will really get their V6 cars to step up.

    Ford has had a pretty good track record in the last couple of years, here’s hoping that they’ll do the right thing and get this resolved quickly and equitably.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I also hope that GM and Mopar will really get their V6 cars to step up.

      If the Mustang is equipped with the base gear ratio, the Camaro competes pretty well. I actually slightly preferred the auto Camaro LT to the auto Mustang 3.7. Unfortunately for GM, Ford offers the performance package and the 3.31 gears.

      The Camaro is set to get a new steering wheel, a power bump, and some interior enhancements this year, so maybe it can close the gap a bit more.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        @ajla: Yes, the Camaro needs something like the Performance Pack on the V6 model, as does the Challenger.

        It wasn’t all that long ago 300 HP out of a 5-6 liter V8 was something of a feat here in the US. Now, were awash with V6 Malibus, Avengers, Fusions, Camrys, etc., that can smoke my old Trans Am!

  • avatar
    retrogrouch

    Don’t forget that the MT82 also has issues when installed in certain Land Rover vehicles outside the US. The gearbox is junk and it will cost Ford 10 times the initial savings to replace all the problem gearboxes in 6 and 8 cylinder Mustangs.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    I’ll allow the stupid name, only if they get Dean “Mayhem” Winters involved in the advertising.

  • avatar
    PG

    Is it common for transmissions to be made in China? I know we all like to think “crappy Chinese quality” (and there’s a reason we do, obviously…), but if lots of trannies are made over there, maybe it’s some other problem.

  • avatar
    FromaBuick6

    Count me as one of those owners with a crap MT82 in their ’11 Mustang. Crunchy second gear, notchy 1-2 shift and really balky going into 5th.

    It’s one thing for a new car to have a defect (albeit a large one in this case, and I wasn’t exactly happy about the paint flaws on the hood, either). But this is so wide spread, all because of a low-grade, Chinese made major component (so much for “Buy American,” huh?), it’s just completely inexcusable.

    This was my first Ford, and it’ll be my last. As it stands, I’ll end up dumping the car before the 3 year bumper-to-bumper warranty is up.

  • avatar
    Z71_Silvy

    “Mayhem”…on the sectaries Mustang.

    Ford has officially lost it’s mind.

    How about, rather than come up with names that the car won’t live up to (it wouldn’t live up to “Meh” though, either…), maybe Ford should, rather than ignore their customers problems with the manual transmission Mustangs, own the problem (like GM has done recently) and fix the damn cars.

    There’s a mind-bender for ya…Ford not only acknowledging a problem with their appliances…but also fixing it.

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    Regarding the new manual transmission issues:

    The bad news is yes, there appears to be a problem effecting more than a few owners. Also, as of yet, no clear cause for the problem(s) has been found. 

    The good news:  It appears to be an issue regarding building (or not building in this case) all of the transmissions to the same spec within the same tolerances, and not a design flaw in the unit itself. The number of customers effected is still very small compared to the total number of manual transmission Mustangs sold.  TrueDelta is showing the 2011 Mustang to be on the good side of average for reliability this far. 

    Bad news that is really good news:  From what I’ve read from everyone experiencing the issue, it seems like it shows up early on. So yes, a bit annoying to have to take your brand new car into the shop, but good because everything is being taken care of under warranty right off the bat.  You will know very quickly whether you have one of the majority of the cars that has no problems, or if you drew a short straw and ended up with one with the issue, but even in that case a quick trip to the dealer and the car is good again, there are no ticking time bombs or long term longevity issues here that need to make anyone worry about what happens when the warranty is up. 

    • 0 avatar
      FromaBuick6

      First off, there’s no “quick trip to the dealer” and the cars aren’t “good again.” My local Ford dealer has jerked me around enough as it is, and naturally they “couldn’t replicate the problem.” And unless you can get them to actually crack open your transmission and find bad gears, etc, the problem is likely to continue for most owners.

      For me, my issues haven’t affected drivability too much, but it is incredibly frustrating when you just paid over $30k for something.

      Moreover, cheaping out on such a major component raises questions about the long term reliability and durability of the rest of the vehicle. The dual clutch automatic in the new Fiesta and Focus isn’t exactly giving owners warm fuzzies, either. So, yes, these vehicles may be ticking time bombs. And TrueDelta can’t paint a picture of long-term reliability based on less than a year’s worth of data.

      • 0 avatar
        SVX pearlie

        You mean like High Pressure Fuel Pumps in turbo BMWs?

        Or Toyota being synonymous with engine sludge?

      • 0 avatar

        There was no sludge in 2.4L of my Toyota when I sold it (I was dumb enough to do a 75k mile service on it, then turn around and say “heck, I want a JEEP”). Now, sludge in Chrysler 3.7L in Liberty, that actually happens. Can’t wait for Pentastar to come around.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        Fromabuick – yes, it’s hard to extrapolate long term reliability from short term results, but in the past mustangs have had very good reliability records, and the 2010 car, which received all of the upgrades aside from the new engines and transmissions has been doing well.

        If your local dealer isn’t helping, contact the Ford customer relations people with the info I posted below and get them to escalate your service request. They have been helping a bunch of people from allfordmustangs.com get past dealers dragging their feet.

      • 0 avatar
        talkstoanimals

        FromaBuick6 – Call Ford Corporate and ask to speak with Richard Fetters – can’t remember his title, but he is high up in the customer complaint resolution group. He should be able to get your dealer to focus on finding the problem. Also, keep all paperwork that relates to the dealer visits in case it gets out of hand and you need to make a lemon law claim.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        The whole “sludge” thing is just something Toyota snd Chrysler came up with to try and shift the blame for their crappy designs to the owner and avoid paying the warranty claims.

        The Toyota 2.4 had inadequate oil flow to the cam bearings
        The Chrysler 2.7 had a timing chain tensioner that was about 90% extended with new components so it couldn’t take up the slack of normal chain wear.
        The Chrysler 3.7 (and 4.7)has a poorly designed head casting that cracks through the lifter bore.

        I’ve seen examples of all 4 that failed and the insides of the engines were spotless and the owner had changed the oil at least as often as the recommendation or way more frequently.

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    Also –  

        Just because a general recall hasn’t been issued yet doesn’t mean Ford isn’t investigating the problem.  There seem to be several different issues in play here – several possibilities of what might be causing the hard shifts, certain owners abusing the clutch, and people reading about the problem then experiencing some kind of automotive hypochondria, imagining that their Mustang has the issue even when it doesn’t. 

    Ford has customer service reps active in several forums, including allfordmustangs.com which has an ongoing thread about the issue. The Ford reps are escalating owner problems with dealership service staff to make sure everyone gets any problem solved in a satisfactory manner. 

    • 0 avatar
      Sinistermisterman

      Nullo – the thread is ongoing…
      http://www.allfordmustangs.com/forums/2011-mustang-gt-tech/293597-2011-2012-getrag-mt-82-mustang-6-speed-transmission-internal-shift-linkage-problems.html
      …because several owners have been stonewalled by the dealers and even by Ford engineers.
      I’m a bit a of a self confessed Ford fan-boy, but even so, Ford need to sort this crap out. Do they honestly think they can coast on their newly acquired ‘Darling of Detroit’ reputation and ignore faulty components? When 3rd party tuner outfits are having to make ‘upgrade’ parts just so the transmission doesn’t trash itself when the said transmission is supposedly still within warranty, you know there’s got to be a serious problem.
      A Mustang is on my list cars I would like to buy in the next few years, but if transmission issues continue, I will definitely look elsewhere.

      • 0 avatar
        stryker1

        Wow… Some horror stories in here. I’ll definitely be waiting on my purchase to see how this ends.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        The Ford reps are posting in the big thread in the 2010+ Mustang Talk subforum over there. Here is the contact info they have posted of anyone here is having issues, or you can just post in the thread over there. 

        Real Name
        Deysha & Justin
        Occupation
        Customer Service Representative

        Social Media Team for Ford Motor Company’s Customer Care division – our primary goal is to help community members find the solutions they are looking for.
        Phone: 800.392.FORD (800.392.3673)

            Signature
        Ford Customer Service Division 

        p: 800.392.FORD

        t: @FordCustService; @Ford

        f: facebook.com/Ford

        I can only speculate that the reason no sweeping announcement has been made yet is that Ford wants to get all of their ducks in a row first and know exactly why all of these problems are happening so that the first fix takes care of everything and this doesn’t become a drawn out issue. 

      • 0 avatar

        Nullo, it’s already a drawn-out issue.

        Yes, Ford needs to get its ducks in a row, and obviously I agree the first fix needs to be the final fix. It’s disconcerting, though, how this problem was reported by owners within weeks following the start of ’11 production… yet Ford still doesn’t have a fix.

  • avatar
    carguy

    In a tribute to Fight Club they should have called Project Mayhem. Not since the Plymouth Prowler has a car been blessed such a felonious sounding name.

    • 0 avatar
      SVX pearlie

      “Ford Mustang Cobra II” – words that strike fear into every racer on strip or street to this very day.

      • 0 avatar
        obbop

        Well, it WOULD whomp upon my beloved slant-6 with a gulp valve three-upon-the-tree air-injection into the exhaust manifold front bench seat equipped 1972 Plymouth Duster.

        But I viewed my Duster as having “sexy lines” with the grooviest decals of a tornado better than any screaming chicken nestled upon a hood.

  • avatar
    GiddyHitch

    Country of manufacture in and of itself has very little to do with final quality these days. Product specification, process control, and quality assurance has everything to do with it. Sounds like Getrag dropped the ball on this one.

    • 0 avatar
      Z71_Silvy

      No…it’s Ford’s deal. They sold the car. Ford has a duty (which they are ignoring) to make things right. Then, if Ford wants to go after Getrag, more power to them.

      And from what I’ve heard…Ford and their grease monkeys don’t have a clue as to why this is happening. The owners are doing the leg work for Ford. MANY owners have had their car at the dealer multiple times and they keep getting the same response…”everything look good”.

      • 0 avatar
        GiddyHitch

        Ford is going to take the PR hit on this same as the Firestone debacle or Toyota’s SUA nightmare but trust me that the cost of replacing the transmissions will get pushed right up the line from dealer to Ford corporate to Getrag to Chinese subcon.

        I’m not sure how long this has been going on but it’s going to take some for Ford to do a proper failure analysis. This presumably includes:

        * waiting for the cars to be brought in for service
        * try to replicate the problem
        * document the problem
        * pull the transmissions
        * send transmissions to Ford for analysis
        * Ford to disassemble or diagnose a significant number of transmissions to determine a root cause
        * figure out a corrective action(s) for the root cause
        * fabricate new parts or modify existing parts as part of corrective action(s)
        * validate that corrective action(s) correct issue and don’t introduce new issues
        * tool up to modify existing inventory/future production/warranty claims
        * distribute new parts/transmissions to production facilities and dealer network

        And this is assuming best case scenario where the failure analysis determines that the problem is caused by a common root cause. I’m just saying that a fix can take a while for a number of reasons and that Ford should be hesitant to jump the gun or shoot from the hip (to mix my firearms references). But dealers will always be dealers.

      • 0 avatar

        Good answer, except that it’s been going on for the entire 2011 model year, and for the 2012s to date (including the Boss).
        Ford’s only attempt at a fix has been clutch and transmission replacements, as many as three from what we’ve seen, and fluid replacement. Nothing to date has worked and other than 1 virtual support person in customer care not a word has been said.
        Meanwhile, several people have pulled these apart and found some really lousy engineering. And people who have researched the history of this transmission have found it has had the same issue when used in other products.
        I don’t believe owners care whether the costs will be passed along to Getrag or not. What they are justifiably mad about is that they paid between 25 and 45k (and more, given the Boss mark-ups) and have had their ownership experience ruined.

      • 0 avatar
        NulloModo

        JW –

        I agree with you that a solution needs to be found for those effected, that sooner is better than later, and that some sort of official statement could help. However, I don’t think it’s a design flaw. Even given the number of posts about this in Mustang centric forums, if you really look at whose making the noise, it’s a very small number of people. I don’t disagree that there is a problem, but it hardly seems that it’s endemic to all 2011 and 2012 manual Mustangs. As it happens though, manual transmission Mustangs are primarily purchased by enthusiasts and enthusiasts tend to be the most vocal and outspoken customers, so the small percentage that are being effected are making a lot of noise (that that there concerns aren’t valid and shouldn’t be addressed).

        Some people are reporting that everything is fine after a transmission fluid change, others are reporting success after some transmissions components are realigned, and others are reporting success after swapping out components. Yes, there are still some that don’t seem to be able to find satisfaction no matter what is done. While I’m sure it’s possible to get two bum transmissions in a row, the chances of this happening are exceedingly slim. I have to wonder if some of the people who aren’t happy with the shift feel even after replacement aren’t imagining the problem. I’ve watched the jmatero youtube video, and yes, it does clearly look like he has a problem with his car still, even after multiple major replacements, I don’t know what would cause that.

        Still, given that most of these transmissions are fine, and that many of those who have issues are able to have them fixed with a single service, I’d be likely to lean towards this being a QC issue and not a design flaw with the transmission. It’s possible that the MT82 is a flawed design due to requiring precise tolerances to be met for it to function perfectly, but again, the vast majority of these transmissions are fine, so I’d be hesitant to even say that.

        I took some time today to speak with one of our service writers to see what they are doing for customers who come in with these shifter issues and he informed me that he hasn’t had anyone come in with it yet. This is at a very large Ford dealership that sells a good number of Mustangs. Granted, we are in southern Florida and many of these issues seem to be popping up in cold weather climates, but I would have expected at least one (then again it’s possible someone has come in and worked with a different service advisor, or that a car has been sold and has minor problems that the owner hasn’t felt merited bringing it in, but still, he hadn’t heard of anyone at our place yet). I thought I recalled someone mentioning mentioning they purchased theirs at Pompano Ford, also southern FL, and saying they had issues, which means it isn’t exclusively a cold weather problem though.

        To my end, all I can say is that if you are having problems, contact your dealer about it, if it isn’t fixed at the first service or if your dealer gives you any static, contact Ford customer relations and have them escalate it so that it is fixed. There is no reason to wait for a recall if you are having problems now – bring it in and have it taken care of.

  • avatar
    threeer

    And yet folks seem to be salivating at the possibility of cheap Chinese cars on our shores…count me out.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      But the reality is that you probably use many items everyday of your life that are manufactured in China. The Mac I’m using has a Chinese manufactured Dell monitor attached to it, and IIRC, we didn’t pay that much for it. My Mac, however, is Taiwanese.

      Electronics aren’t cars you say, which is true. But the Chinese have been contract producing all kinds of complex items for consumption here in North America for quite some time now. I would be interested in seeing a Chinese Buick LaCrosse compared to a USDM LaCrosse to see if the two are similar in parts and assembly quality. I’d bet they are, because the Chinese are using the GM system of assembly.

      Most of the horror story cars we hear about are the indigenous Chinese makes that have no great legacy of production like Western companies. But both VW and GM seem to have no issue selling Chinese assembled cars in other parts of the world. Like another posted noted earlier, these issues have little to do with where the trans was assembled.

      But as luck would have it, I’m in no hurry to buy a Chinese car. The Mexicans can actually build one cheaper and it’s closer, too.

      • 0 avatar
        ponchoman49

        And we have sent out no less than 5 defective Apple Macbook laptops out of 30 for total power failure which is unacceptable. Tools- I have yet to buy anything power or hand that lasts 6 months to a year without failing. Appliances- pure non lasting junk. It is a known fact that Chinese steel and paint are inferior to our own in the states. Knowing that there transmissions are finding there way in many cars and there tires are suspending our cars is really quite scary.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        The Chinese will produce any quality of good you are willing to pay for. They will cheerfully produce 4th rate junk, or they will produce iPhones. But even when producing iPhones, you have to ride herd on them HARD! You cannot just give them specs and expect that they will consistently meet them without outside quality control. And that outside QC COSTS! Sometimes to the point that it is not worth producing in China. Companies are learning this the hard way.

        BTDT, have the t-shirt.

      • 0 avatar
        SVX pearlie

        Exactly right.

        Where manufacturers in other countries might simply say they can’t / won’t cut that deeply, the Chinese will build up (or down) to whatever spec you are willing to pay for. If somebody specs low cost as the #1 priority, don’t be surprised that quality takes a hit in direct proportion to how little the price is. Spec high quality, and you’ll pay accordingly.

        GM, Boeing and other large companies seem to do OK, precisely because they spec higher quality and test rigorously. Same with the Japanese doing contract work in China.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        By the time you go for premium Chinese, with all the required oversight, is it really cheaper than making it here? I wonder…and if you add in the societal cost of unemployment it should be a no brainer. I do know that Philips investigated making CFL lamps here instead of China and they stated that the cost of the final product would be 50% more. Not sure that I buy it, but even if true, I’d gladly pay $1.50 per lamp at the Depot instead of $1.00 that I pay now.

  • avatar
    mnm4ever

    Just more evidence why Facebook marketing is ridiculous and stupid. The worst part is, I bet 90% of the people who voted for that dumb name are not even old enough to drive, let alone will ever actually buy a “Mustang Mayhem”. The only good news here is I wouldnt have bought a V6 Performance Package anyways, regardless of the name. Still a douchie name.

    • 0 avatar
      Z71_Silvy

      For the price of a V6 secretary car with the performance package…you could probably just buy the proper V8 powered GT.

      • 0 avatar
        Jellodyne

        This year’s secretary is almost as hairy chested as last year’s real man. What an age we live in when a 300+ horsepower car is for the little lady.

      • 0 avatar
        GiddyHitch

        Granted that the V8s have always sounded glorious, but the implication that the current 300hp V6 is performance deficient when the V8s were outputting the same power or less not too long ago is a very ignorant comment.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Yeah, I thought of that, and priced it out on the Ford site… the base GT still comes out $5k more. Plus, the base GT gives up a lot of desireable options, so when spec’ed with the Brembos and nicer interior, it was about $12k higher. Thats when I realized the Boss wasnt such a bad deal, if you can get one at sticker price.

        However, before they offered the 5.0 GT, I wouldnt have considered a Mustang, IMO last year’s 300hp V8 just wasnt enough, especially at that price point. I wouldnt say the current V6 is deficient, but I would say that last years V8 was.

        So I would say that this year’s secretary is now up to last year’s teenager with a few straggly chest hairs. This years hairy chested real man is still quite a jump from the secretary.

  • avatar

    There were dozens, if not hundreds of better options other than “Mayhem,” so I really don’t know how Ford settled on this awful name.

    I still want the car, though probably with an automatic lest these manual transmission issues magically resolve themselves. Is it ONLY on the GT they are having these problems?

    Also, while this transmission may have been built in China, it was designed by ze Germans…designed using cheap stamped steel shifting forks. The Chinese merely assembled it. So, while I am all pro-America (and I own three Fords) the blame should really be fingered at Getrag, not the Peoples Republic of China.

    • 0 avatar
      SVX pearlie

      Toyota Corolla “GT-S Action Package” comes to mind here.

      All show, no go.

      Typical Toyota.

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        I think you mean Celica. While the action package added a ridiculous wing and no add’l performance upgrades, I’d hardly call a 180hp, 2500lb car all-show and no-go. If they’d have driven the rear wheels instead of the front, it would have been an amazing car.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        The Action Pack was available on the regular GT Celica as well, but it was just an appearance package. Not sure why everyone gave them so much crap about it, body kits were all the rage back then, and the AP was a really nice kit. You could order it from the dealer pre-installed, or buy it later on, the first gen came pre-painted and fit like factory parts for no more money than a decent quality aftermarket kit would cost. I personally dont like any body kits, but the AP was a nice looking kit if paired with wheels big enough for the car. It looked especially dumb when people bought it but kept the stock 15″ steel rims (or even the optional 16″ alloys).

  • avatar
    mfgreen40

    Nullo Modo You seem to be a reasonable Ford man. I would like your thoughts on how Ford handled the thousands of V-8 engines that spit out the spark plug because of only 4 threads in the alum. head. Yes I know this is a small percentage of the total engines built but after spending $2000-$3000 for a new head these people and their friends and relatives will never buy another Ford. For such an obvious flaw Ford should have at least helped these customers instead of sticking it to them.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      I’ve never had direct contact with someone who had a spark plug shoot out of their engine, it’s always ‘I’ve heard it can happen’ or ‘a friend of a friend’ type of scenarios. From what I understand having talked to our service techs and Ford engineers who occasionally come by during new product tours one of the biggest issues was plugs being replaced without following the guidelines set forth from Ford for those engines.

      The 5.4 liter V8, which is among those that was noted with the plug issue, is one of the most common engines on the road due to the perennial sales success of the F-150. Plug replacement requires reaching around at an odd angle, and it’s very easy to break a plug off, cross thread, or not fully seat a plug if you don’t know what you are doing.

      A combination of tons of these engines on the road, a design decision that made plug replacement more difficult that it probably had to be, and service being done in many cases by those not fully trained in how to do it properly likely led to the majority of the issues. Ford did change the heads during the run of the effected engines, and the new V8s all have completely redesigned setups where it comes to spark plugs.

    • 0 avatar
      Ion

      That issue with the 5.4 plugs only happens if you crush the threads installing new plugs. The 5.4 was used mostly in the F-series, whose main clientele subscribe to a git’er done! mentality. I doubt those people have used a torque wrench for installing new spark plugs and went with the old “goodentight” method .

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Doesn’t the Chevrolet Equinox have the highest Chinese component content of any US market car? How have they been for reliability? Probably no worse than GM’s average.

    I suspect Mayhem won because of the entertaining Allstate Auto Insurance commercials. I love the ads, but this name for a coupe amounts to sabotage.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      You may be thinking of the previous generation ‘Nox, that one came with the Chinese assembled 3.4 V6. The new ones with the Ecotec and the OHC V6’s, the motors are not assembled in China, nor is the 6 speed autobox.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Should have checked my recollection. Thanks. Does the new one still use a Japanese gearbox?

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        @CJ: I can’t find any info (quickly) right now, but I think the Nox and Terrain use the same trans as the Malibu, which I’m pretty sure is US sourced (Toledo maybe?). I believe it’s the same one shared with Ford for their FWD cars.

    • 0 avatar
      FromaBuick6

      “Made in China” shouldn’t be automatically damning. I’ve owned some products made in China that were perfectly good, and some that weren’t. Once upon a time, “Made in Japan” was synonymous with “cheap crap” (To a lot of domestic fanboys, it still is, but whatever).

      The problem here is that Getrag and then Ford signed off on a component with shoddy assembly quality. Doesn’t matter if it was made in Shanghai or Sterling Heights.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        China can build to any specification, but there is plenty of empirical evidence that shortcuts are taken there that were never taken in Japan or even Detroit. Ever buy Japanese pharmaceuticals made out of drywall? OTOH, I have a pair of mountain biking shoes I bought in 2006. They’ve outlived many a US, Italian, or Japanese made bicycle component, to the point that I looked in them the other day to find out where such amazing shoes were made and was surprised to find out they were Chinese.

      • 0 avatar
        SVX pearlie

        Made in Korea or Taiwan wasn’t always the best, either…

        All else being equal, if quality is the concern, I’d bet on the car made in Shanghai over the one from Sterling Heights.

      • 0 avatar
        GiddyHitch

        “Ever buy Japanese pharmaceuticals made out of drywall?”

        Nope. I also didn’t buy a certain American SUV after watching line workers smoking and dropping ash all over uncovered differentials while assembling rear axles.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Always let the early adopters suffer the consequences. Better yet, wait for the last year of the production cycle, MY2013 I think. While folk are peeing on themselves over the 2014 Mustangs with indepentent rear suspension & whatnot, I’ll get a bullet proofed, current generation for thousands under invoice.

    It’s a relatively small sample of Mustangs affected and before the internet, we would never hear about such teething problems. It’s good thing because the internet community holds a car maker’s feet to the fire. In the past, Ford would have acused the owners with bad transmissions of abuse, denied the claims while quietly updating future transmissions.

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    I honestly think the new Mustang V6 is righteous and was salavating about being able to buy one say in the 2013 model year. Let’s see how the transmission thing goes. Although thank god they’re not calling it the “Mayhem V6″ on the window sticker. I can just hear my independent Insurance Agent now (who knows me quite well and is roughly my age.) Me: “Yeah could you work up a quote for me on a brand new V6 Mustang?” Him: “Sure what sort of options does it have?” Me: “blah, blha, blah… “Mustang Mayhem” Him: “Dan, could you repeat that, I’d swear to god you just said ‘Mustang Mayhem.\'”

    Maybe the universe is trying to get me to buy a low mile 5.3V8 powered Impala SS, Lacrosse Super, or Grand Prix GXP.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      @Dan: I too am casting a longing glance at one of the V8 W bodies. I loooove the sound of the GXP’s, it sounds like the old Trans Ams. Only with four doors. But, the reality is, with one in college and another there shortly, plus the fact that I need a good hauler for projects around the house and my band, a HHR SS might be a better choice.

      But it won’t sound like the GXP, for sure.

    • 0 avatar
      MikeAR

      Dan, you need the 95-96 Impala SS. It would be the perfect car for you.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    I went downtown last weekend, something I try not to do. I wound up in a slow moving exit line from a parking garage near a Ford Mustang driven by gangbangers or wanna-be-gangbangers. It was purple, debadged, riding on at least 22 inch diameter die-cast wheels, and had a sound system playing what seemed to be march of the T-rex from Jurassic Park at 150 decibels. We could feel it more than hear it. At one point I could see the back window of the Mustang. There was a big sticker on it that portrayed poor old pirated Calvin of Calvin & Hobbes. He was taking a leak on a ‘GT’ logo. Its a different culture, I suppose.

  • avatar
    MarcKyle64

    I think I would like the automatic version better. 300 hp at the flywheel does not equal clutch longevity to me.

    • 0 avatar
      Sam P

      Clutch longevity depends on the driver more than any other factor. If you ride a clutch or blip the engine to 3500 rpms and then slowly let off the clutch to get started, you’ll kill almost any clutch within a couple years.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      You probably would prefer an automatic, since your comment implies that you don’t understand how to properly operate a clutch.

  • avatar
    obbop

    Needed the use of a right-angle grinder to fix the shanty.

    Heigh ho, off to Harbor Freight I go.

    On sale. Was it $12.99?

    A couple years ago or more and the mind works furiously just to recall yesterday.

    I do remember being somewhat surprised about the improved-over-the-past fit and finish of the product.

    Plastic and aluminum blended into a virtually seamless whole.

    Hefty in weight and smooth during operation.

    Minor casting blemishes in a few spots with the aluminum body parts but minimal and I have seen worse with tools built in 1st-world countries; including the USA.

    I was impressed. Especially in the quality-per-cost category.

    Sure, would regular long-term use produce satisfaction? I do not know.

    I may never need it again but it is there; stored inside to assist long-term longevity and every year or two I will and continue to plug it in, make it go whirrrrr to keep the innards mobile, then stow it again.

    Being a solo creature, hermit-like, I had to buy since it was cheaper than renting and the new cost is so low the used market is absent.

    Might need it to access dumpsters some day when my body no longer allows head-long dives over the rail into dumpster innards where dinner awaits.

    Praise to outside electrical outlets. A boon to Boomers forced to use tools to retrieve vittles by pulling a “Shawshank” and “digging” their way through the dumpster wall.

    And how handy to fend off any Xers, Yers and later “ers” with the audacity to purloin MY dinner from MY source.

    My grinder against your ankle.

    I will win.

    Grrrrr…………

  • avatar

    It’s unbelievable kid stuff. I can’t wait to see what the insurance companies say about this. You have to wonder what Ford thinks the demographics are for this car.

    One note, the TR6060 is made in Mexico – not the USA. Tremac has made all of it’s manual transmisisons in Queretaro, Mexico for years (I checked that with their press group for my own website). IF the MT82 was designed better, it would be a better transmission because the gear ratios are much more optimal, the weight is less, and the shifting effort is much better.

    But unfortunately, due to design flaws as well as assembly issues, there is a lot of risk in buying a manual transmision Mustang. And for those of us who might want to use one on the track, even more risk because it’s very likely that any and all warrenty service will be denied. The problems extend right from the start of the 2011MY right thru the 2012 Boss models. Huge mistake to buy one of these now.

    -Jeff
    DrivingEnthusiast.net

    • 0 avatar
      Sinistermisterman

      “Huge mistake to buy one of these now.”
      +1
      Absolutely. If you fall into the enthusiast category when shopping for a manual Mustang (which I’m sure a fair few people do), then I’m sure enough people will know about the problems and will steer clear of buying one until Ford announce a fix for it.

  • avatar
    340-4

    Coming soon to Mustang DIY forums:

    How to get that Mayhem badge off of your car without damaging the paint.

    Next month: rebuild your 6-speed stick – in your kitchen!

    • 0 avatar

      Good one!
      That’ll be very common, because if an owner drove the car with any enthusiasm at all, your warrenty coverage wil be ended. Look what happened to this guy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6IhadvWIX6o

      And this is very common for performance Fords. The entire history of SVT was riddled with these kinds of issues, culminating in the disastrous 2003 Cobra (most total engine replacements of any Mustang ever) and the Ford GT (suspension control arm replacement and other parts at 40k/car). This is the reason why SVT isn’t the same engineering and product organization that it once was. Very possibly it’s also why Coletti suddenly left.

      • 0 avatar
        SP

        I never heard of any problems with the 03 Cobra or the GT. Can you point me to some reference material so I can read up?

      • 0 avatar
        faygo

        @JW Fisher :
        SVT has _nothing_ to do with the Mustang GT nor it’s transmission.

        SVT is integrated far more into mainstream engineering processes at Ford currently than it was in the past and there is none of the cowboy mentality which was apparently commonplace in the Coletti days.

        the current products speak for themselves.

        based on the tone of your web site, you seem to have a bit of an axe to grind, perhaps justified, perhaps not.

      • 0 avatar
        faygo

        @SP :

        the two major issues with the Ford GT were :

        1) supplier quality issue with manufacturing process on the control arms which required all cars to have new arms fitted and a “no drive” order was issued for cars in the hands of owners, a rare situation. there was the potential for the suspect parts to break in use, so not driving the cars was the best option, albeit an embarrassing one. Billet arms were provided as replacements and a new supplier and manufacturing method was implemented. I believe the billet arm’ed cars are valued due to the bling factor of billet anything, but I may be mistaken.

        2) rear main seal leak due to finishing/tolerance issues on the crankshft. repair procedure was a Speedi-Sleeve which required pulling the transaxle.

        while respectively potentially scary and annoying but harmless, at least GTs didn’t burn to the ground due wheelarch liner glue problems like the Ferrari 458. there were a number of other smaller issues and service bulletins issued to resolve them.

        I am not aware of ’03 Cobra issues, I’m sure JW will inform us.

      • 0 avatar
        MikeAR

        If I remember the 03 Cobra had IRS issues. They broke mostly because drivers dumped the clutch to much while drag racing. It was more of a driver issue than mechanical. I had an 00 Cobra R with the same IRS and never had problems because I didn’t do that kind of thing.

        THat whole name is stupid and it should be a lesson to not do social media marketing. You appeal to idiots and lose intelligent customers.

  • avatar
    seabrjim

    All I have is gear whine that started at about 1500 miles.Even when coasting in neutral. At 3000 miles it isnt going away. havent had the problem of not going in gea either. Fingers crossed. 2011 gt 6 speed,4 months old.

    • 0 avatar
      faygo

      likely the rear axle, not the trans. it’s something the dealer should be able to diagnose and resolve, stick axles are not exactly new technology after all :-)

  • avatar
    obbop

    I wonder why so many folks downplayed the spark plug spitting Ford engines?

  • avatar
    mazder3

    Ford should come out with a ZEV Mustang:

    “The Electric Mayhem!” Wakka-wakka!

  • avatar
    Ry_Trapp0

    whoa whoa whoa jack!!! the getrag trans are not FAILING(I.E., breaking), they are having hard shifting issues. there are plenty of 10 second 600+RWHP full weight mustang GTs with 100% stock getrags(aftermarket clutch aside), and not one has broken(which is quite surprising based on previous GT trans). this is a VERY young trans, and, just like the 5.0l, there will be some issues that will take a few years to work out. the TR6060 is an upgraded version of the old T56, and is STILL having issues in the 2012 shelby GT500.

    as far as the ‘mayhem’ name is concerned, it was voted on by mustang fans on facebook.

    • 0 avatar

      Not broken? Metal bits in the bottom of the tranny, broken off teeth, and broken shift forks. That doesn’t mean “broken”? Look at all the pictures in the forums.

      Not to mention owners trust and dreams broken.

      Obviously another great example of Mustang engineering here. Their engineering and testing process is obviously broken, too. Or if not broken, then just plain crap.


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