By on March 15, 2011

“Fine. You either die a hero, or you live long enough to see yourself become the villain”

-Harvey Dent, The Dark Knight

What is it about human nature that forces us to destroy the things we love the most? Jaguar’s E-Type died long ago, shuffling off this imperfect mortal coil to take its place in automotive Valhalla. And, if we really loved the XKE, that’s where we’d let it stay, swathed in the immortality of the glorious yet out-of-reach past. Instead the E-Type is being destroyed in the name of love… and on the 50th anniversary of its birth, no less. For between €500k and €1m (depending on the number of takers) Switzerland’s Robert Palm will modify a new Jaguar XKR into this hollow mockery of the E-Type’s epic proportions and classic design cues. Called the Growler E 2011, this 600 HP beast is neither a high-quality, faithful resto-mod like the Eagle E-Type, nor a truly modern interpretation of the classic. Instead, what we have here is a wire-wheeled lesson in learning to let go.

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36 Comments on “What’s Wrong With This Picture: If You Love Something, Let It Go Edition...”


  • avatar
    alfred p. sloan

    Whatever, that car looks good.

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    I don’t see anything wrong with taking inspiration from one of the most beautiful car designs ever.
     
    Parts of this I really like, but it does have a few major flaws to my eye.  The rear fender is cut oddly around the wheel, obscuring the top edge of the tire and not flowing with the rounded sculpted fit of the front wheel cut.  The front fender vents evoke a Mercedes SLR or Chrysler Crossfire – in either case they look out of place here, a simple one piece sculpted vent, if any is needed at all, would look better.  The chrome mirrors and thick chrome band around the back end and in front of the tail lights looks out of place and cheapens the effect of this car.  A Jaguar should derive its wow factor from the attention to detail in the flowing body lines, not from tacked on bits of chrome.

    • 0 avatar

      Disagree on the chrome bits as they’re very much like the orig., but otherwise Agreed.
       
      This guy even Improved on the original, as it doesn’t have the ugly hump-back as a coupe, where the vintage only looked good as a ragtop.
       
      Also, I don’t think he’s doing the car any service by going Quad-headlights instead of glass-enclosed Duals in the front sidepods like the original.
      -Even if he did want to update them a tiny bit and make them look more near a Vantage.
       
      As for the side extractors, a simple oval/long teardrop with a chrome slash through it in the same position as the Aston ones, and maybe a jaguar-head lozenge on the slash, would have been a better choice.
       
      +It’s off the images here, but another fault you can see on AB is that the designer’s logo looks like a 50′s Corvette emblem. -Totally wrong message and another necessary deletion.
       
      Either way, you have to admit the guy has stones to take on this, of all designs. -What’s he going to try next, and Alfa 33 Stradale?

    • 0 avatar
      BigOldChryslers

      I disagree about the back-end.  I’ll go further and say that, if the Mercedes SLS had this fastback roof and rearend treatment, it would look much better.
       
      I’m not keen on the front clip.  Two headlights would definitely look better than four.  Otherwise, I like it.

    • 0 avatar
      Steve65

      I like the rear wrap-around chrome pseudo-bumber. The shape of the rear wheel cutout actually more closely approximates the original than the front does – it’s one of the details that makes it instantly identifiable as an emulation of the E-Type. I could definitely do without the scallop cut out of the fender and door. IMO it would look better without that detail. I’m guessing that for €1m, they’ll shape the sheetmetal any way you want them too.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      My thinking on the chrome is that on the original the chrome bits where functional bumpers, now bumpers are integrated into the front and rear body of the car, so the chrome just looks as if it were tacked on (tackily) for decoration – and this is coming from a guy who usually likes chrome.
       
      Similarly the fender cut does look a lot like the original, but I wonder if the original had to be done that way due to techniques available at the time, or if it was done for a design purpose.  On this one it makes the car look too ‘slammed’ for my tastes, I’d prefer a wrap around treatment that didn’t obscure the tire, but I don’t have the money for one of these anyway, so, my opinion probably doesn’t count for much on them.

  • avatar
    Mullholland

    Ed—I think you’ll have the role of villian on this one. Sure it’s just a plaything for the über-wealthy but I think it’s quite nice. A beautiful reinterpretation of a classic. Heroic, even.

  • avatar
    Philosophil

    He’s probably just peed off at the continuous lineup of boomer-oriented retro’s.
     
    I think it’s a fine looking car, myself.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Ostensibly, this is why the FT-86 is in the pipe**—because Gen-X and the leading edge of Gen-Y is just, maybe, almost worth exploiting.
       
      ** and why Lucas “revisits” Star Wars every six months and why they’ve made one Tron and three Transformers movies.  We don’t get many cool cars because, let’s be honest, cars are expensive, movie tickets are cheap and G-X and -Y are still under the Boomer’s financial heel and will be for quite some time.

    • 0 avatar

      He’s probably just peed off at the continuous lineup of boomer-oriented retro’s.
      What on earth would make you think that?

      Ed—I think you’ll have the role of villian on this one.
      Someone should have said something along these lines, oh, about three years ago. By now I’m not just used to playing the villain, I’m almost beginning to like it. To keep with the Dark Knight theme, I’m not a monster. I’m just ahead of the curve.

  • avatar
    cvarrick

    It should come from the factory looking like that. IMO it’s an improvement on the original, it does the long hood short deck without looking like a rolling phallus.

  • avatar
    210delray

    Growler?  Isn’t that something you take to your favorite micro-brewery for a refill?

    • 0 avatar
      tallnikita

      No, a growler is something that sits under the water surface and sinks ships.
      Great looking car, why not give today’s rich something other than a blinged-out SUV or a hyper sports car.

    • 0 avatar
      Sinistermisterman

      You’re both wrong. In the country where the E-type originated (Britain), ‘Growler’ is slang for something else completely. I nearly pissed myself laughing when I first read the name.

  • avatar

    A few useless details have to go, and I’m not sure about the wire wheels, but I kind of like it.  But really for that kind of money I’d rather have a real XKE, get a nice XK120, maybe a XK coupe, and still have money left over for a nice new shop.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    The shape is ok. The details are a little odd.  The wheels are ghetto fabulous.
     
    Which is to say, they ruin the whole thing.

  • avatar
    mazder3

    Meh. Looks better than most reinterpreted classics, and for €1M who gives a hoot. It’s their money, let ‘em do what they want with it.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      The flip side to a society where we let you do what you want, more or less, with your money is that you have to accept our freedom to criticize you for what you do with your money.
       
      The latter part of the above eludes many people, and they get very defensive when criticized, claiming that critics “have no right” to tell them what to drive/eat/live in/have sex with/whatever.  And they’re right—I don’t have the right to tell them what to do.  I do have the right to call them an idiot for what they’re doing, though, because calling someone an idiot (with explanation and, occasionally, citation) is not the same as preventing them from doing it.

    • 0 avatar
      M 1

      Unfortunately, the latter part of your explanation seems to elude even more people.

  • avatar
    twotone

    Beautiful car. I’m sure one of the US custom car shops could put this together for well under that price.

  • avatar
    Steve65

    Carping about detailing aside, it’s instantly recognisable as a modernized E-Type, and I like it. I’d have to insist that the hatch hinge on the side rather than the top though.
     
    Anybody but me ever noticed that in many ways, the BMW Z8 is a dead ringer for an E-Type roadster?

  • avatar
    tonyola

    I’ve been seeing this around the blogosphere for the past week. Overall it looks pretty good, but it needs the following changes:
     
    1. Two eyes on the front. Not four.
    2. Lose the side vent or at least the little grille-thing in it. This is supposed to be a Jag, not a Corvette.

  • avatar
    Mullholland

    I’m not a monster. I’m just ahead of the curve.
    Thanks for the clarification. Still don’t know if you’re funny or delusional.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    I have to side with Ed on this one.  The E-type is damn near perfect(aesthetically, not mechanically), there’s nowhere to go but down when imitating it.  But it’s not a terrible looking car, and it’s a Growler, not a Jag, so I rate this a solid “whatever”.

  • avatar
    Mullholland

    I’d avoid digging too deep into the distinction.
    Thanks for the advice. I thought you’d be all about digging deep into what distinguishes one thing from another.

  • avatar
    Almost Jake

    I don’t particularly care for the old E-Type, but this car looks very nice. Better than most other Jaguars.

  • avatar
    Boff

    This is by far the best aftermarket rebody job that I have ever seen.*
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    *File under Praise, Faint.

  • avatar

    I beg to differ. This one is even better than the original, like a constantly updated classic by the factory itself. Much like Morgan is still doing. Better, call it more contemporary and more practical, proportions for starters. The Swiss guy only never seem to get the headlights right. Latest pictures suggest that he is still tinkering with alternative shapes.


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