By on March 15, 2011


YouTube user Bajabusta has done us quite a service by uploading so many old Car & Track road tests from the late 1960s and early 1970s. We watched the ’72 Volkswagen 412 exhibit some scary trailing throttle oversteer last week, and now it’s time to watch a classic Detroit land yacht make its stately way around a test track.
As the C&T testers found, the ’71 Marquis was a dream during long highway drives, but totally out of its element when called upon to heave its vast bulk around a turn. Since this review was done before the 1973 OPEC embargo, no mention was made of the car’s no-doubt-execrable fuel economy.

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72 Comments on “Vintage Road Test: 1971 Mercury Marquis, Get Your Dramamine Ready!...”


  • avatar
    Halftruth

    Watching this thing corner was painful to say the least..

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      Yeah, they “handled” really badly. I had a loaner of the Ford version of this car in 1974, and it was scary bad. It was crap brown, with a tan vinyl top. It shook like it was going to come part when I went over 48 MPH, and made some amazing noises at all speeds. It only had 38K on it!
       
      I had it for 3 days, and was so happy to give it back and get my car back.

    • 0 avatar
      Diesel Fuel Only

      If you think that’s bad, check out the braking on the Chrysler 440 review.  The wheels look like jiggling jelly.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      Uncle Buck drove one of those pigs:

  • avatar
    joeveto3

    Awesome.  Chocolate brown, white top, hidden headlamps.  If gas were free, I’d be driving one of those today.
     
    Hey, whose turn is it go looking for the hubcaps?  One, two, three…Not It!  Nose goes!
     
     

  • avatar
    GS650G

    “Ride Engineered by Lincoln Mercury”

  • avatar
    Zackman

    That leanie-beanie into the turn reminds me of my old 1952 Chevy – my first car. That thing looked to want to lay down like an old dog when making a sharp turn!

  • avatar

    That brown paint is simply stunning.Plus, indirect Panther Love.

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    That’s not a nice way to treat a “living room on wheels.”

  • avatar
    BuzzDog

    Got to love those double-whiteline tires that were popular on luxury cars. My Dad’s 1970 Ninety-Eight was originally shod with them; I think B.F. Goodrich made them.
     
    I almost expect to see a blindfolded diamond-cutter in the back seat saying, “Perfect. Beautiful.” Or perhaps a few years later, an SNL “rabbi” performing a bris…although the latter was actually done in a disguised LTD II.

    • 0 avatar
      supremebrougham

      Ah yes, “The 1978 Royal Deluxe”…
       
      If I recall correctly, I believe they used the Mercury Cougar version of the LTD II.
       
      One of my all-time favorite SNL spots!

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      “Got to love those double-whiteline tires…”

      BuzzDog: I had a pair of Firestone Wide Ovals with thin red walls on the above-mentioned ’52 Chevy! Thanks for reminding me of that!

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      Actually it’s the Royal Deluxe II. And the road they used to film the bit was the infamous Little Neck Parkway near where I grew up. Not really a parkway at all but a wide, craters-of-the-moon riddled boulevard on the edge of Queens.

      My godfather had a love of British cars. I once went with him on a test drive of a Vanden Plas Princess Mk II and we immediately headed for Little Neck Parkway to test the ride.

      “A beautiful boy.

      <pause>

      and

      <pause>

      a beautiful car!”

    • 0 avatar
      mazder3

      For the youngins who weren’t around for SNL’s early years or for those who want to relive it, the “ad” for the “Royal Deluxe II” is on Hulu.

  • avatar
    86er

    At least they were pretty hard to roll.

    Next up: we race my old 1986 Chev 1/2 ton at LeMans.

  • avatar
    dastanley

    Those bias plies just turn to dust in the corners.  I owned a used 71 Ford Custom 500 (the stripper Ford version of the car in the video) and the 351W 2BBL was a dog, but it got me where I was going.  When I replaced the bias plies with radials, it made a huge difference in ride and handling.  But even so, the car was still a pig in the streets of Atlanta.  When I floored it, the clowd of blue and black smoke from the single exhaust was both fun and embarrassing, depending on who was around.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      Apparently the Lincoln-Mercury division agreed about the tires, and by 1973 radials were standard, making it very popular with…. chauffeurs?

      BTW, I would _love_ to see the return of ‘at the sign of the cat *growl!*’

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      @Nullo Modo: I too, would love to see the return of the “Sign of the Cat”. But I think we’re too late…

  • avatar
    supremebrougham

    My grandparents had one of these when I was quite young. Same car, but there’s was green on green. I’ll have to ask them what happened to it…This one makes their 1997 Grand Marquis LS look like a European sports car in comparison.

  • avatar
    VanillaDude

    Buyers of this car remembered unpaved roads, stripped metal interiors, Conestoga wagon rides, dust filled hot interiors, mohair, gasoline fumes, backfiring, crank starters, and hard metal surfaces inside and outside of cars.

    So to these buyers, the Mercury Marquis was what they considered to be a modern marvel. Driving at it’s finest. Air conditioning, silent rides, the sensation of being disconnected from the road and flying through the air, tufted soft fabrics with deep pile carpeting, electric windows, cigarette lighters and ashtrays for four smokers, a padded vinyl carriage styled roof with padded vinyl side trim, four speaker stereo radio, arm rests, 4800 pounds of mass surrounding you – well, that is what passed for modern to people who remembered early motoring and roads.

    When we consider where the US was when it came to auto transportation just forty years earlier than this, we can better understand what a modern marvel and futuristic machine a 1971 Mercury Marquis was in it’s time.

    Just as we look upon this vehicle forty years from 1971 and are shocked at what passed as acceptable road cars, these buyers from 1971 were shocked at what passed as acceptable road cars in 1931.

    Without a historic background as to the life of these 1971 buyers, we cannot always understand the appeal of popular purchases made in 1971. They were as intelligent as we are. We are not really all that different from them. I believe if we were all returned to 1971 with a 1971 mindset, we would find this car appealing too.

    • 0 avatar
      cfclark

      Buyers of this car remembered unpaved roads, stripped metal interiors, Conestoga wagon rides, dust filled hot interiors, mohair, gasoline fumes, backfiring, crank starters, and hard metal surfaces inside and outside of cars.

      My assumption is that this is why my grandma (born 1911) and grandpa (born 1907) had a ’75 model of one of these…they had gone through the Depression and this car would have represented everything they had not had back then (Grandpa drove a bread van for a living for a number of years, and a Marquis would have been about as far from a 1930’s-40’s bread van as I can imagine.)

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      That’s…. a very interesting and insightful perspective.  Well done.
       
      I still hate cars of this ilk—that doesn’t change—but it’s at least gives me a more rational basis for criticism.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      Fast forward 100 years, and our roads, while immeasurably more sophisticated, are still terrible and getting worse.  There’s still a place for this type of vehicle (of course in a bit tidier package).

      Road feel is vastly overrated as a quality in an automotive conveyance.

      Now, before you reach for the reply button and say, “hey, don’t impose your views on me, 86er”, I have reached this conclusion based on the quality of Saskatchewan roads and highways and the dearth of these things called turns that would necessitate quicker steering ratios, stiffer suspension and the like.  I don’t need to feel every expansion joint just to avoid a little undulation around a curve or over a frost heave, thanks.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Road feel is vastly overrated as a quality in an automotive conveyance.

      I’d agree with you, were not every car I see in Montreal**  equipped with punch-you-in-the-kidneys suspension tuning.  Combine that with the fact that a) three times as many people live there than in all of Saskatchewan, and b) Montreal’s roads are still the worst I’ve seen in North America. So obviously someone values them, and Montrealers aren’t much more maladjusted than average.

      ** not that Toronto isn’t bad—it is—but Montreal is still ahead in the “Why fill in the potholes if they’re just going to get chunked out again in 48 hours?” game.  Toronto, at least phones in an effort

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      @86er: And the older you get, the more interested you are in a smoother ride. As I approach 50, I’m finding the sport suspensions on my cars just a little too intrusive these days. I’m thinking the next car will be more isolated than the ones I have now.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      Professor Psar writes: Montrealers aren’t much more maladjusted than average.

      Hmmmmmm… not touchin’ that one.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      “–4800 pounds of mass surrounding you–”
      You realize that describes most of the SUVs on the road today?  Things really haven’t changed all that much.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      “And the older you get, the more interested you are in a smoother ride. As I approach 50,…” Geozinger, you ain’t seen (or felt) nothin’ yet! Wait’ll you turn 60! Having said that, I do like my Miata, but in smaller, non-freeway doses beyond back and forth to work on occasion.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave W

      The last American car my dad owned was a Studebaker. In ’71 he had a SAAB 96 while my mom had a LTD wagon. There was no question which car was more fun to drive ( I eventually bought the 96). It was also no question which was the choice to take 6 people on 2 week road trips.
      I still like station wagons but being in my 50s I guess that vertigo /seasickness is more of an issue then jolts as we just bought a fiesta.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      @Zackman: I’m the youngest of four, and based on seeing what happened to my parents and my sibs, I have an idea of what’s going to happen to me. However, my siblings didn’t have a couple of rollover accidents and rear end collisions to prep their knees and back disks for degradation like I have. Woo hoo!
       
      Like my sibs tell me, getting older ain’t for p*ssies…

  • avatar
    tonyola

    Dad had a ’72 Marquis Brougham pillared sedan for several years – metallic navy blue with a white top. Very handsome car as well as being trouble-free and high quality. The 429 4V in his car offered a good deal more oomph. While the handling was just as hopeless in stock form as the test car, Dad put in harder shocks and better tires with more air than the ultra-soft recommendations. The car could actually take corners without threatening to scrape off the door handles.
     
    Bud is right about the Marquis being very close to Lincoln. There really wasn’t much reason to spend the extra money for a Continental – it had a bit more room and a tad more power but it was dynamically no better or plusher than the Mercury. Though the Marquis shared the basic platform with the Ford LTD, there was no question that it was a huge step up. The Marquis Brougham sold very well in the early ’70s despite being as expensive as a Buick Electra 225. For several years, the pillared hardtop Brougham was the single most popular Mercury.

    • 0 avatar

      When I was 7 years old, my Father special-ordered for my Mother (they were 29 and 30 years old back then) a brand new 1972 Mercury Monterey Custom 4 door pillared hardtop in Medium Blue Metallic w/ a blue vinyl interior and a white vinyl top – The Monterey Customs came w/ the 400 cid Cleveland V8, C6 transmission, Power Front Disc Brakes & Power Steering as standard equipment.
      Dad ordered it w/ AC, the Decor Package (nicer trim), Tinted Glass, Turning Lamps (they replaced the front marker lamps mounted ahead of the front tires – a white lamp within the larger housing came on to light the way when the turn signal was activated) Front & Rear Bumper Guards, Radial Whitewall Tires, an AM Radio, Rear Fender Skirt Delete and undercoating (we lived in Upper Michigan when the car was purchased).  I recall years later Dad saying that he wished he had ordered the Right Hand Rearview Mirror, an AM/FM Radio, Power Doorlocks and Cruise Control – but that was the only dissatisfaction ever voiced about the Monterey.  The ride was majestic, the car felt solid & never rattled, we enjoyed acres of space for ourselves and all the luggage we could pack, the A/C was nearly silent and quick to cool us to sub-arctic temperatures in the summer and it looked more expensive than it cost.
      It took us cross-country numerous times – including the trip where we had numerous blowouts due to the aftermarket Firestone 500’s (You thought the Explorers in 2000/2001 were the first time this happened?) – but with a whole new set of tires we made it to California just fine.  Other than that – it was oil changes, a new CV joint at about 80,000 miles, new engine-cooling hoses at about 95,000 miles, the occasional lightbulb, and a replacement body panel below the rear bumper after Mom reversed down the driveway after a snowstorm and skidded into a snowdrift leaving the panel stuck in the snow…
      As it aged the metallic paint gradually faded, but the vinyl never split – inside or out – the engine never leaked oil and the transmission always held the correct gear.  That car lasted over 100,000 miles and 11 years, and it would have lasted longer – even after after my Mother purchased her first Volvo in 1983 – but I drove it into the side of a Karmann-Ghia…
      …I still miss that big, handsome blue Mercury.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick

      Brian your dad really missed out…he could have ordered a ‘Snapper’ edition Mopar.

    • 0 avatar
      zenith

      I’ve owned 3 Ford LTD versions of this chassis-one with standard suspension and 2 with HD. The HD suspension firmed-up cornering without wrecking the ride. Going from the 26psi inflation recommendation to 32 also helped cornering and did nothing to ruin that wonderful sense of isolation from the bumps. Don’t know why Ford didn’t just go with max inflation all around instead of recommending a “normal” inflation and a trailering inflation.

  • avatar
    nova73

    Dad traded in his ’66 Tempest on a new ’70 Marquis Colony Park wagon.  I remember asking him why he was trading in our beloved Tempest.  He explained that soon the Tempest would need new shocks and brakes.  Besides, the Marquis had the most interior space of any car.  When I contemplated this, I felt reassured.  The Marquis had a 390, probably a 2V.  I recall it was a reliable car, except for occasional carburetor trouble.  A torque monster, the 390 was quick enough off the line.  The wagon lived up to its claim of spaciousness, hauling a ton of gear on vacations or scouting campouts.  I cannot recall attempting any extreme handling maneuvers; no doubt they would have been memorable.  Unfortunately, we traded it in for a ’76 Volare wagon with a 225.

    Years later I noticed an ad in an old magazine for the Colony Park.  The caption said, “If Lincoln made a wagon this would be it.”

  • avatar

    I must admit I look at the big Detroit barges of this era with some humor; I started driving in 1982, when most examples I encountered up close were beat-to-shit hoopties driven by my punk- and/or metal-head friends who slapped Dead Kennedys stickers on them and did drunken burnouts in the 7-11 parking lot.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      I recall a friend had a 78 New Yorker as a hand-me-down.  It was a little tired, but even then in my pre-car buff days, I approached it with a certain amount of appreciation for what they were going for there.  Seats that stretched out to the horizon, with more metal in it than some of those combines that my dad prepped and delivered.

    • 0 avatar
      dastanley

      I’m with you Murilee.  I started driving in ’81 and what I saw most in the high school lot were old Beetles, and clapped out late 60s, early 70s barges.  A very few Datsuns, Hondas and Toyotas thrown in.

    • 0 avatar

      I started driving 10 years later but then, I was the only one at the high school parking lot still driving a pre-1975 boat (a ’68 Buick Wildcat 4 door hardtop). The second oldest car was a mid seventies Cordoba and most students were riding FWD econoboxes from the eighties…
       
      It wasn’t an economical ride but as soon as I got rid of the bias ply tires that were on it, to replace them with a set of used radials, it got decent handling! 3.42 posi axle, 360 hp and 475 lb ft of torque were enough to make this barge nervous!
       

  • avatar
    MAQ

    Back in 1982, I bought a used 1973 Marquis Brougham with all the extras in Kentucky and drove it to California. It had the optional 460 engine with a two-barrel and could run on regular gas. Great ride in the most of comfort but, as the article says, you had to slow dramatically for turns. A true land yacht!
    I drove it for a couple of years in LA but then took it to Cabo San Lucas in Baja where it lived out its days. With its pale yellow paint and green “landau” top, it was a great favorite of the locals as most of the taxis down there then were LTDs but none with the 460.
    Many times I was hailed by tourists thinking it was a cab. I even gave a few of them rides. I would start out speaking Spanish and, mid-way, switch to English just to play with them.
    The low compression meant I could run it on local gas with no problems.
    After about two years, I sold it to a local and it was later lost in a hurricane. I’ll always remember the “Old Yellow Dog” with great fondness.

  • avatar
    tonycd

    Just after I got my driver’s license, my father had brought in his pride-and-joy ’69 LTD for a complete tune-up. It was a fleet car, but he had paid extra from his own money to grace the car with the then-new 429 top-o’-the-line engine option. He let me drive the thing — once.
    When it was newer, I had ridden as his ignorance-is-bliss passenger as he picked passing-duel fights with Caddys up to 100 mph on the Interstate. Now I was finally at the helm of the beast myself. Even as the neophyte I was, I immediately recognized the rough outlines of what I was dealing with. In all its obese, 400 hp (though underrated, I’m convinced, by the factory), drum-braked, bias-ply glory, the thing was limitlessly and effortlessly powerful, utterly unconnected with the road beneath it, and quite simply pillowy death waiting to happen. I was in awe of the power, but glad to park it and get out alive.
    A few years later, I was driving my ’71 GM intermediate on the crown of a 4-laner at 35 in a few inches of slush, and it drove itself inexorably into a post, insensitive to every one of its controls. I remember the car nostalgically, but during my ownership it suffered a wheel bearing failure, a carburetion adjustment problem, and other stuff we’d never tolerate in modern cars. Thank God they don’t make ‘em like they used to.

  • avatar
    Contrarian

    My dad bought a 4-door 1971 Marquis Brougham, also green vinyl on green. It has a 429 2BBL which i eventually changed into a 4 barrel, reducing the mileage from 12-13 down to about 11-12. The week after I got my drivers license, my younger brother, my dad and I piled some luggage in it and drove from Milwaukee to Edmonton Alberta to visit relatives. I drove almost all the way there and back and hurtles across the Canadian praries, between horizon to horizon grain elevators, at around 100MPH while my dad slept. I remember slowing down to about 60 through the small towns and feeling like we could get out and walk that speed. For a person who was destined to drive a lot of highway miles in the intervening years, this trip was a wonderful baptism-by-fire. The car got us there and back in as much comfort and safety (well comfort anyway) as anything made almost 40 years later.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Thank God for bajabuster and his archives of Car and Track TV shows. It was one of the things I loved most about the old Speedvision, and one of many things I curse the Speed Channel for taking off the air (again). Stupid all NASCAR all the time programming policy…
     
    When I grow up, I want to be Bud Lindemann…

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      I get my fix of 70s Detroit performance iron watching The Rockford Files on Netflix.  Pretty amazing what they could do with an old Firebird, and it’s fun watching the land barges of the day try to keep up.  You’re almost guaranteed at least one car chase per episode!
       
      Try to avoid the episode where he’s driving a rental Vega out in the desert.  Possibly the most excruciatingly dull chase sequence ever committed to film.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      @Russcycle: Used to love the Rockford Files as a kid. Watched it every Friday night, religiously. Until I found out about girls…

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      “Try to avoid the episode where he’s driving a rental Vega out in the desert.  Possibly the most excruciatingly dull chase sequence ever committed to film.” Russycle: No, that honor has to go to the movie “Duel” when Dennis Weaver struggles to get to 55mph in his Valiant, complete with over-dramatic effect and over-anxiety! I think he was in the same desert, too.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      @Zackman: Oh man! I remember Duel! What a torturous movie! There’s two hours of my life I won’t get back. That came out long before everyone had cable and 200 channels, so anything automotive on TV was worth a shot. Except that movie. UGH.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Heard of Duel, but never saw it.  Steven Spielberg’s first film, I believe.  Nowhere to go but up after that, I guess!

    • 0 avatar
      mazder3

      @Zackman and geozinger
      Would you believe that that slow-moving POS made-for-TV movie is highly rated by movie critics? 86% fresh rating on Rotten Tomatoes. ***** in the Video Movie Guide. Why? It’s JAWS on the highway!!! Excellent cinematography!!!! Full of suspense!!!! It shows man’s struggle with machinery in the fast paced modern world!!!!! It’s Steven Spielberg’s first feature film!!!!!! It won an Emmy for Outstanding Achievement in Sound Editing!!!!!111!!11!!!ELEVEN!
      Blah, blah, blah, tl;dsi, the only good part is when that prehistoric Peterbuilt goes flying off the cliff, taking the weakest Valiant ever with it.

    • 0 avatar

      Duel was based on a short story originally published in Playboy by Richard Matheson
      You can read it here:
      http://www.kobobooks.com/content/Duel/sc-CfHzcnU2BkCv51ulWv36VA/page1.html?scRedirect=true#1

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      @mazder3: Yeah, I saw that on IMDB. We must have been much more easily entertained back then, I guess… But the guy has done a few really good ones since then.

  • avatar
    GS650G

    You could do three cheerleaders in the back seat of that thing, no doubt about it. A Smart4two fits nicely in the trunk along with golf clubs, keg of beer and luggage.
    Woe to any foreign import car that tangles with that battering ram front end. Armed with a 429 V8 we are talking full breech of the barricades

  • avatar
    gator marco

    When I see one of those early 70’s Marquis, all I can think of is the REAL Hawaii 5-0, “Book’em Danno!”

  • avatar
    Jerry Sutherland

    A lot of guys wouldn’t spend a few hundred bucks trying to win one of these big 70s Mercs in a raffle but this guy did.
    http://www.mystarcollectorcar.com/2-features/stories/198-1976-mercury-grand-marquis-the-raffle-prize.html

    • 0 avatar
      cfclark

      That was my grandparents’ car, the two-door version, in a royal blue though, and a ’75. They bought it the summer before my grandpa passed away, and my grandma kept it for a long time, I want to say the mid-to-late-80s. The doors were larger and heavier than she was by a factor of two, I’m sure. I remember that it was massive, quiet (the loudest sound inside was the click of the turn signal relay), and comfortable for us kids when we went to visit. My aunt had a four-door in sort of a p*ss yellow, with a puke-green vinyl top, same year.
       
      That car may seem inappropriate for today, but you can’t beat a $200 car with 35,000 miles on it–for what you’re not shelling out in car payments, you can buy a lot of fuel for that beast, not to mention a CD player to replace that 8-track.

  • avatar
    skor

    Difficult for us to understand why cars like these sold in such large numbers back in the day, but like other already stated, that’s what the people who bought these sleds wanted.  I have a neighbor who is in his 80’s, to him, the hallmarks of a quality car are quietness, smoothness and good straight line acceleration.

  • avatar

    The body roll in those curves is absolutely terrifying. There’s a Motorweek review of the 1990 Chrysler Imperial somewhere on Youtube that is similarly eye-opening.

  • avatar
    gottacook

    @tonyola: One reason these cars were a step up from the equivalent Fords was the longer wheelbase, a distinction Mercury retained versus Ford all the way up through the 1978 model year.
     
    I recall clearly that 1971 and 1972 Marquises and Montereys nearly always displayed taillight lens damage in short order – was there ever a more vulnerable taillight?

  • avatar

    My dad had a 1972 Monterey, fairly loaded, in an ugly shade of baby sh*t green. As I recall mileage wasn’t terrible, maybe 12-14. My father liked it so much that he replaced it with a black ’74 Grand Marquis Brougham. Now that was a living room on wheels. AC so cold you could use it to chill your drink. Actually, with radial tires, the car had some grip, or maybe the understeer was so bad that you couldn’t brake the rear end loose. Whichever it was, the car was smooooth out on the highway. The fact that all that weight got around corners without the tires chirping was impressive.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Everyone is justifiably making fun of this thing but sadly, it’s about 1,000 pounds lighter than the popular Lincoln Navigator.

  • avatar
    Nick

    What the hell was up with car colours in the 70s anyway?

    • 0 avatar

      They were awesome and they need to come back.

    • 0 avatar
      Diesel Fuel Only

      Even premium brands suffered.  Rolls-Royces with dual tone exteriors with matching dual tone leather/piping (you could custom order anything, after all) in all sorts of colours that remind you of one part of the digestive process or another.
       
      I even once saw a pic of a Mercedes 600 in some sort of metallic green with Emerald green leather seats and darker green carpeting.  Bad as any Buick or Mercury ever was.

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      @Sajeev +infinity.  And give me more contrast in interior colors, and not just if I plunk down big bucks for leather.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      Dan and Sajeev,

      The closest I ever saw to colour variety in the 70s tradition was green/green ’97 Marquis I saw for sale last year.  Quite the thing to see.

  • avatar
    supremebrougham

    @86er
    Sounds to me like you saw the offered-for-1997-only Vermont Green. It could be had with the Willow Green interior.
     
    Can you tell I worked at an L-M dealer back then???  :)

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      Hi Richard,

      It was spectacular, especially because it seemed so out of place in 1997, when everything was moving inexorably towards the monochromatic Borg.

      Ah well, I’ve got my anachronistic exterior and interior chromatic schemes for my respective vehicles, will wait out the storm. 

      Maybe the Return of Colour was heralded by the choices you see in the Malibu; or maybe it’s a false dawn.

  • avatar
    LandShark

    I remember whan I was about 5 my Dad, who was a police officer, had a city take home car. It was a 1975 Dodge Monaco four door with a 440. It was brown with white painted top. I’ll never forget the joy of climbing onto that brown vinyl bench seat in the summer only to end up with third degree burns on my thighs. Or the absolute awesome growl as the secondaries on the four barrel would open up at full throttle. This early experience had it’s affect on me. In high school I drove a 1969 four door Malibu light green with green vinyl interrior. I currently own a 1971 Mercury Marquis like the one above, only mine is a two door, brown with brown vinyl top and parchment brown interrior. The 429 is a beast of a motor and I am currently in the process of installing an intake, cam, and 770 holley carb. I love the stares I get when cruising down the freeway. I think the best feature of the car is the ’70s Dukes of Hazard style CB antenna on the trunk. It really compliments the 800 pounds of factory chrome.


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