By on February 7, 2011

Chrysler is proud of the fact that they did NOT release their Super Bowl ad on YouTube like most of the others. “While many sponsors revealed their advertising plans for Sunday’s Super Bowl, the Chrysler brand remained tight lipped to create a stronger impact for the reveal of their new marketing and advertising campaign featuring famous Detroiter, Eminem,” their press release says.

Their unprecedented 120 second spot (in the advertising world, that counts as feature-length) supposedly sold the new 2011 Chrysler 200, and (we gave you fair warning) introduced the brand’s brand new tagline, “Imported from Detroit.”

Chrysler should apply for funds from Detroit’s city development agency, because the ad is mainly an ad for Detroit, with the Chrysler 200 as a product placement. Why? As the off speaker says, “Because when it comes to luxury it’s as much about where it’s from as who it’s for.”

Chrysler is playing a risky gamble with this ad. The power of the national identity of a brand is overvalued, and often, it turns into a liability. This is why large international brands usually try the utmost to disassociate themselves from where they are from. With everybody knowing that the Italians are calling the shots at Chrysler, the gamble becomes twice as risky.

No wonder that Detroit is ecstatic about the ad. “Detroit had a presence on that very important national stage — and a message,” jubilates the Freep. However, the Detroit paper had to concede: “Don’t know if it will sell cars. But Sunday night, it sold a city.”

Like any audacious gamble, it could be a win or a lose. Give us your odds.

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81 Comments on “Chrysler Has A City To Sell To You...”


  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    A hood rides anyone?  Definitely the first ad I’ve seen for the Chrysler brand that has teeth like the recent ones for Dodge and Jeep.

  • avatar

    I guess “Imported from Auburn Hills” didn’t have the same ring to it.

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    From the original Sh*t my dad says (regarding the Tigers I think): “I wanted to see Detroit win.  I been there.  It’s like God took a sh*t on a parking lot.  They deserve some good news.”

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    I liked the the no-holds-barred dramatic nature of the ad, and it was certainly pretty to look at with the cool camera shots.  I don’t know if I would have picked Eminem for spokesman in a midsize sedan ad, but I guess he has name recognition.
    I didn’t realize Chrysler was going to try to position the 200 as some sort of luxury car.  I imagined they would have trouble getting people to accept that it was more than a warmed over Sebring, getting anyone to accept that it’s a premium product is going to be a major uphill battle.

  • avatar
    mdensch

    I’m pretty jaded, I’ll admit.  But that ad works for me.

  • avatar

    Gorgeous ad. Just brilliant. But effective? It seems like a weird way to advertise a Chrysler 200, of all things. I can’t help but imagine how that ad would have worked if the car had been more obviously worthy of it — if Eminem had been driving a Mustang, say, or maybe a CTS, or hell, even a 300. That’s the preconception they’d like to shake, of course, but it may be hopeless with that particular car.

  • avatar
    Jimal

    I thought the ad worked well. It went for national identity without resorting to the Stars & Stripes and fireworks. Eminem, while a bit of a polarizing figure, is from Detroit and wasn’t over the top. Well done.

  • avatar
    findude

    Awesome ad. Probably the best of the evening.
     
    There are still no Chryslers on my short list of cars to buy, nor is Detroit on my list of places to go.

  • avatar
    threeer

    One of my two favorite ads (both car related, go figure).  With all of the knocks on Detroit, this was done extremely well.  Say what you want about Eminem, but the ad had presence and drama.  Now if Chrysler could just make cars that lived up to this…here’s hoping for some positive spin for the Motor City off of this.

    And the VW commercial with the mini Darth Vader was just too cute to mention…too bad my two favorite commercials deal with auto manufacturers that are selling less than spectacular vehicles (though the Mercedes ad with P. Diddy had a ton of eye candy…Pagoda Benz, anybody??).

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      threer: You just stole my thunder! Totally agree. The best ad was the VW one followed by Chrysler’s, hands-down! Chrysler is stiving for relevance, and like Lee Iacocca once stated in his first book (paraphrased), “if you’re going down, might as well start screaming, someone may just hear you.” Well done, Chrysler, well done!

    • 0 avatar
      Jimal

      I’m going to have to disagree with the VW mini Darth Vader ad. I just don’t know what all the hype is about. Kid dressed up in a costume when it is no where near Halloween failing at fictional Jedi mind tricks until dad panders to him with the remote starter on his Passat. So what? And the Star Wars thing is completely and utterly played out. I used to be a huge Star Wars fan… until the second set of movies came out and the world became saturated with Star Wars everything. Move on.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      Jimal: I’m not a “Star Wars” fan either, except for the originals, but I felt the ad was the best because of how all scenes worked so well together – how it was produced, the sheer quality of the work done and how it all came off.

  • avatar
    Morea

    And in a related item, there was a BMW add proudly describing how their little SUV (X3 I think) is made in South Carolina and exported all over the world, presumably even back to Germany.

    Detroit is still the big leagues in the auto world.  You don’t think Marchionne is personally excited to be running a Detroit auto company?

  • avatar
    lmike51b

    Definitely one of the better ads, if not the best.  But all of that for a Chrysler 200?

  • avatar
    autobahner44

    Spot-on fantastic and compelling advertisement for a car that is mediocre at best.

  • avatar
    SVT48

    Well, they showed they know how create an ad that grabs your attention and stood out above the rest. Now, can they build some cars that do the same?

  • avatar
    JJ

    I like the ad itself, it’s just that neither Detroit nor the product appeal to me. The product will be available to me as a Lancia in the near future, but of course as car enthousiasts we all know it for the Sebring it really is.

    That said I think Chrysler may have made a smart move here. They focussed on one of the only reason some people might buy this product, namely its nationality. They know they can’t compete on product at this point so instead they try and make people feel good about buying a Chrysler for different reasons, like support or at least sympathy for the home team. They need to sell some of these puppies and this might just be the best way to do it. Focus on the ‘idea of the product’ rather than the harsh realities of the product itself.

    It’s a bit like yesterday’s episode of TopGear where a car I somewhat dislike with a passion, the Mercedes S65 AMG, suddenly came to life for me when I saw it driving through the miserable, rainy Albanian countryside. I was all ready to start hating on it but then I kind of found myself understanding the appeal of that car all of a sudden.

    Or like a Maserati Quattroporte; you know a 7-series, A8, S-Class, Lexus LS or Jag XJ are better…But the Maser is Italian, it’s pretty and it makes sweet noises…just enough to sway the decision in its direction for some.

  • avatar
    mdensch

    I think the commenters, here and elsewhere, who think that the ad is about the 200 are missing the point.
     
    The car is a prop and serves as a metaphor for Chrysler which is a metaphor for Detroit which is a metaphor for the U.S.  Looking deeper into the message, it’s time to set aside the cynicism and self loathing and face the reality that we (all of us) really are as good as the rest of the world.

    • 0 avatar
      OldandSlow

      Yep, the ad dovetails nicely with the Jeep GC ad that used the theme that we still make things in America.  The Detroit motif in this ad, with George Foreman’s fist and all the other imagery, plays to that theme.

    • 0 avatar
      dave-the-rave

      Absolutely agree. More than launching the 200, they are relaunching the Chrysler brand. (And it certainly needs that).

    • 0 avatar
      pgcooldad

      OldandSlow,
      Gonna have to correct you on this one. That was Joe Louis’s fist.

    • 0 avatar
      OldandSlow

      Oops, that’s right!

    • 0 avatar
      Signal11

      That jingoistic Jeep ad was cringe inducing and as an American who works mostly overseas was quite frankly embarrassing to watch.  It went for “we know how to make stuff” but ended up reading as an attempt to sell the concept of America because they had nothing else to sell.
       
      On the other hand, the 200 ad was tasteful and well made, which by association gives me the sense that the actual car and/or brand might also be tasteful and well made.
       
      If we were to personify the two ads into salemen, the Jeep ad is a guy who’s essentially waving a flag screaming “America!  F*ck yea!” while the second guy seems like an underdog making an honest comeback.  And if there’s anything that we Americans are supposed to like…

    • 0 avatar

      Old and Slow, that’s Joe Louis’ fist.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Mercedes S65 AMG, suddenly came to live for me when I saw it driving through the miserable, rainy Albanian countryside.

    I would only agree with this IF the ad featured at least one of the thousands of Hoxha-era bunkers! Now that would be something that would be a stand-out! Just sayin’…

  • avatar

    “What does this town know about luxury?” the ad asks.
    “Nothing!  Absolutely nothing!” I shout back at the TV.
    But I have to admit, the ad was perfectly done.  Kudos to the many people who brilliantly created a short film based on the theme of Detroiters as underdogs trying to create a uniquely Detroit-based luxury car.
    But in the end, I wondered what luxury features Detroiters would invent that were unique to the city. Anti-carjacking measures? Better security devices? Heated seats were already invented, by the Europeans.
    I really do love the ad, although the Beatle one was better in that it made me curious about the car itself.  The Chrysler ad makes you curious about a city but not necessarily curious enough to want to visit.  Here in my cozy home in Palm Beach County, Florida I think I am better off staying put.
    And enjoying real luxury, on Worth Avenue, which is the most amazing three block auto show you have ever seen.  Just walk down there and you’ll see cars you didn’t even realize were made.
    D

    • 0 avatar

      Do a little research… many “luxury” features now widely standard were actually created at GM, for Cadillac — including the first automatic transmission. I think including heated seats, too.

    • 0 avatar

      David, I really don’t know how to say this, so I’ll be blunt.
       
      You sound like a HUGE stuck up, condescending dick, and you’re totally ignorant to automotive history.
       
      If you knew anything about cars beyond which ones are the most expensive, you’d know Cadillac was the standard of the world when Ferruccio Lamborghini was still making gas heaters.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      All I could think of was the white dude trying to look intimidating and too-cool-for-school. Much ado about nothing as far as I am concerned.
      I’ve seen the car and liked the pics.
      As for Detroit – the perfect of America gone wrong. Greed and apathy took Detroit down. I hate to see the history there lost.

    • 0 avatar

      You are right that Cadillac was highly innovative at one time, decades ago.
      Of course this is an ad for Chrysler, not Cadillac, but that doesn’t matter.  We’re talking about the American auto industry in general.
      When I think of Detroit, for better or worse, I think of cars that were built at some point after I was born. Miserable cars.  Cars that fell apart moments after they left the factory. Cars we should be embarrassed to admit we made or owned. Detroit’s cars are better today, but the bitter memory lingers.
      The ad was trying to say that today, right here, right now, Chrysler has something to say about luxury.
      Others have pointed out the rather non-luxurious characteristics of the car being shown off in the spot.
      I was asking, what is it that Detroit knows about luxury, after “going to hell and back”?  What would be uniquely Detroit innovations, today?
      I wasn’t asking about yesterday, I was asking about today.
      I think it’s a fair question.  Maybe I am a jerk.  But you can’t win an argument by attacking the messenger. The ad was an emotional message about Detroit.  I am responding with my own emotional reaction, which is that for decades, Detroit made some of the worst cars on the planet.
      So I’m trying to ask an interesting question.  What would be uniquely Detroit luxury, in this day and age?  What can a Chrysler 200 bring the world that the world needs, specifically because it was from Detroit?  The ad is claiming there is something.  I’m calling them on it.  What?
      D
       

    • 0 avatar

      The Chrysler ad makes you curious about a city but not necessarily curious enough to want to visit.  Here in my cozy home in Palm Beach County, Florida I think I am better off staying put.
      Try Kercheval in Grosse Pointe, almost any street in downtown Birmingham, or Orchard Lake Rd near Pontiac Trail.
      The concours formerly held at Meadow Brook, now held at St. John’s in Plymouth is one of the top 2 or 3 concourses in the US (Newport and Amelia Island are the other two). The Detroit Autorama is one of the two most prestigious custom shows in the country.
      Your friends in Palm Beach wish they had as much style as a 1940 Lincoln Continental or a CTS-V coupe.
      As for style, the Detroit area was home to three great architects, Kahn, Yamasaki and Saarinen.
       

    • 0 avatar

      What would be uniquely Detroit innovations, today?
      Many of the features on today’s cars first appeared in concept form in a GM Motorama car, one of Exner’s Ghia built concepts or an advanced Ford design. I was at the GM Heritage Center today and the Buick Centurion had been loaned to them by the Sloan Museum in Flint for the recent memorial service for Chuck Jordan (who drew the Centurion). The Centurion had a working rear view camera.

    • 0 avatar

      I must admit to preferring warmer weather.  Tough to teach an old dog new tricks in that regard.
      But here’s the thing: The ad is tricky.  It doesn’t say Grosse Pointe knows luxury.  It says Detroit does, and its hard-working people do.  The ad put me in a certain mood, a certain mindset, had a certain emotional punch that doesn’t include Grosse Pointe in the meaning of “Detroit”.  Let’s say that it’s difficult to associate the word “Detroit” with “Luxury”.  The ad tries to make this association.  I like the gutsiness so on one level I am rooting for them and on the other level I just don’t see how the two words come together.  Does that make better sense?
      That’s pretty impressive about the Buick Centurion concept, though. I’d better ask, because I don’t know: What make first introduced rear view cameras in a production car? I’ve always associated them with foreign makes, not domestic. Certainly in the ensuing years after Centurion, the Big Three made a lot of cars that really could have used rear view cameras.
      D

    • 0 avatar

      Detroit has it’s own, unique luxury. You have to understand that Detroit has always been a blue collar city, and hopefully always will be.
       
      If you want to understand that, you need to understand Detroit. Detroit was once a great city, full of well paid workers who lived off GM, Ford and Chrysler’s dollar, and lived quite well at that.
       
      The rest of America was also living quite well. There was a time when the average worker could buy a luxury car with a big V8, leather interior and all the gadgets necessary to impress their friends, The average worker could afford a Buick, Mercury, Oldsmobile, or high end Dodge or AMC. If you had “made it” (Most of the people who had were still blue collar workers, by the way) you could afford a Chrysler, Cadillac or Lincoln.
       
      That is the true legacy of Detroit luxury. Cars that your average blue collar worker could afford, haul their family around in, and yet still outlast your blueblood European cars. It’s funny seeing someone these days talk about how American luxury cars suck, yet hold up Germans, British and Italians as somehow better, when they all break on every day ending in the letter Y.

  • avatar
    Trend-Shifter

    Roots, the definitive sequel.       

    Gutsy creative advertising, love it!  Keep the momentum rolling.  
       

           

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    I was suprized it was a 200 ad and not a 300 ad.  The funny thing is that Eminem had been featured in a “Brisk Ice Tea” ad earlier in the night (as a claymation character) and he said; “I’m not a spokesperson because after someone asks me to do it I usually find out the product is crap.”  Does that mean the 200 is something Eminem has driven enough to give it his stamp of approval?  After the commercial was over my 25 year old fiance (who basically only enjoys stuff off his first album) said to me; “Isn’t that an old man’s car?”  (Speaking of Chrysler in general.) I replied; “It’s only an old man’s car cause the old folks were the only loyal buyers left.  Let’s see what Chrysler can do.”

    Forgive me for getting on my soapbox for a sec.  Chryser always fired my immagination more than GM did.  GM always has seemed to me (at age 33, and I say this having owned GM products the first 8-10 years that I had a licence) like a company that was too big and to dumb to succeed.  A company full of good ideas and then they would find someway to shoot themselves in the foot.  Chrysler on the other hand always seemed like they had the best engineers who would then be hampered by low volume sales that would force them to sell the same basic components for decades on end.  Diamler tried to “GM” Chrysler by cheapening their basic parts and interiors and forcing them to accept “German Engineering.”  I guess deep in my heart I want to see Chrysler succeed more badly than I want to see GM succeed. 

    • 0 avatar
      OldandSlow

      GM – whose headquarters is in the heart of Detroit – doesn’t have the cojones to feature a commercial with a Detroit theme.  The UAW 200 is assembled in Sterling Heights, MI.  The 300 is assembled by the CAW.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      +1 to both of you. Chrysler had the looks but none of the ones my family and friends owned seemed to last very well and I’m not brave enough to see if I could get 200K miles out of one like I have repeatedly with VWs and Hondas I’ve owned. Taking a $20K chance is too risky for me.

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    The ad was great, but: I hate to break it to the announcer, but I don’t have to rely on the media – I’ve been to Detroit a couple of times, and the place has had the ever-loving piss beaten out of it. When you’re told not to walk the five blocks between the MGM Grand and Cobo hall – even in broad daylight – you know something’s wrong. And it’s deserted – it’s like a video game level without any enemies added. Freakish.
     
    One of my cab drivers said he doesn’t walk around downtown without a gun…
     
    Now, the Audi commercial – now you’re talking. The cell block full of ‘rioting’ wealthy, furiously tapping their brandy glasses, was classic.

    • 0 avatar

      When you’re told not to walk the five blocks between the MGM Grand and Cobo hall – even in broad daylight – you know something’s wrong. And it’s deserted – it’s like a video game level without any enemies added. Freakish.
      The irony is that downtown Detroit is so deserted as to be pretty damn safe. My lovely life partner and I made the walk from Cobo to the MGM during NAIAS and we saw all of two people along the way. Ditto the walk from Cobo to Greektown. We had a bag full of important things (computers, passports) and we never once felt even close to threatened by anyone. If downtown were a war zone, at least something would be happening… as it is, Detroit feels like a ghost town.
      It’s been said (by someone flying over Eastern Europe) that communism is the only economic system you can see from the air. Detroit has a similarly grandiose air of failure about it. It reminds me of visiting Eastern Europe in the late 90s… both felt like a sight-seeing trip to the ash heap of history. But if Eastern Europe can recover from its decades-long nightmare, it’s possible for Detroit as well. Walking around the city though, that seems like one incredibly far-off vision.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      The problem with deserted cities is that there is no one to hear you call for help when it all goes sour for some reason.

  • avatar
    Ironghost

    Detroit should be proud of that ad.

  • avatar

    I’m sure that our commenter on Telegraph Road will agree that this ad got cheers in Dearborn and down at the RenCen as well. You usually want the teams in your own team’s division to go far in the playoffs.  I’m interested to see if the shorter form ad edits will be as effective.
    At first the idea of pitching the Chrysler 200 on luxury seemed inappropriate for a mass market midsize sedan (Toyota and Honda don’t sell the Camry and Accord based on luxury, at least not in their ads) but it’s the most crowded segment there is and you need something to distinguish yourself. Chrysler’s been working hard at upgrading their interiors so maybe pitching the 200 on luxury makes sense.
    From the ads for the 300, and now this, it’s clear that Chrysler is trying to use upscale style as a selling point.
    One of the things that makes the ad effective is that it shows stylish buildings, things, and people in Detroit. The man in the cashmere coat crossing the  street, Marshall Fredrick’s Spirit of Detroit statue, the Rivera murals, the beautiful and ornate Fox Theater, interesting office buildings and nice homes. Architectural giants like Kahn, Saarinen, Yamasaki, and Wright worked in Detroit. Did Harley Earl and Edsel Ford not have a sense of style?
    On a cinematic note, the ad has an atypical view of the Detroit skyline. Normally the downtown skyline is shown from the Windsor side of the river, or facing downtown from the north. This ad includes an angled shot from the middle of the river on the Belle Isle bridge.

    • 0 avatar
      pgcooldad

      I’ve seen the church and the three smoke stacks many times but can’t recall it’s location. Other than that it was fun seeing how many landmarks I recognized, which only means I’m getting older :(

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    Loved the add. Perfect eminem song in the background. If your familiar with the lyrics the add is more meaningful. Brilliant!

  • avatar
    JMII

    Good spot, but I am an Eminem fan.
     
    Everyone at our party quickly voted the VW Passat Darth Vader ad #1, it was just too cute.
    I thought the BMW ad was good too, but nobody else got it: a popular Germany luxury vehicle is built only in America and shipped around the world. This really is a big deal. I thought the Z4 roadster was also made in this plant, but that wasn’t mentioned.
    GM was promoting the heck out of the Cruze and doing their best to make the Volt look good, but as I warned my wife: its an average looking car, you might pass one on the road and never notice it.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    The ad had a nice look to it, although it didn’t show much of the car.  Until the end, I thought it was going to be an ad for a re-vamped 300.
    For a certain group of viewers (who are, to varying degrees pissed off at the apparent failure of the domestic auto industry), this may have the effect of getting them to the showroom to look at the car.
    Let’s hope they’re not disappointed.
    On the subject of car commercials, I thought BMW’s commercial showing that the new X3 was designed and built in America was good.   I thought the Audi commercial was kinda funny, as was the VW “Darth Vader” commercial.  If there were other car commercials during the game, I don’t remember ‘em (I have a vague recollection of some commercial for the Volt).
    The “Chrysler from Detroit” commercial was, at least, memorable.  I’m way out of eminem’s demographic; his presence didn’t detract.
    But all commercials — this one included — are implied promises: that the product truly is what it is portrayed to be.  And, if the product disappoints, no commercial is going to save it.

  • avatar
    geeber

    The ad itself is quite good, but if the goal was to sell Chrysler 200s, I’m not quite sure it succeeded. Most people outside of this message board don’t care about Detroit at all, and if they do know anything about it, they realize it’s not a great place to visit.

    And the car itself is nothing spectacular…the ad is pitching it as some sort of small luxury car. But the 200s I saw at the Philadelphia auto show weren’t competitive with a Fusion or an Accord, let alone a near-luxury car.

    • 0 avatar
      HalfMast

      “but if the goal was to sell Chrysler 200s”…

      I don’t think it was.  I really think this was about Chrysler as a brand more than any individual car.  In the past 10-15 years, associating a car with Detroit was a drag on it’s perception and value.  Instead of fighting that, they are trying to address it head on, while also trying to position Chrysler as both a luxery brand and an import-fighter.  It’s a lot to accomplish in a single ad, so while they wanted to feature a new car, I think they decided the car was less important than the brand on this one.

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      “Most people outside of this message board don’t care about Detroit at all”

      I can’t cite any study, but I disagree that most people don’t care about Detroit. I think Detroit is the Rocky Balboa of American locales, and a lot of people would cheer like crazy to see it get off of the mat and throw some more punches. The ad plays on that love of a determined spirit unwilling to quit even when beaten down.

      Whether the 200 lives up to that spirit is another matter, tho.

  • avatar
    HalfMast

    For those wondering about the car choice…  the director was quoted in an email to another (lesser) car blog that they went with the 200 over the 300 because it’s actually made in Detroit (well, suburb).  300 is made in Ontario.  Good catch to the ad guys!

    Plus, if you think about the fact that the average consumer doesn’t know that 200 used to be pronounced “Sebring”, it is a new car without the baggage of an old model to go with it.  300 may have been a better car, but tell me that you don’t start running a list of stereotypes in your head when you see the 300!  And Eminem behind the wheel would reinforce at least half of those stereotypes!

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      +1 My thoughts exactly. Angry -insert ethnic group of your choice- who feels it necessary to be intimidating to be cool but to me comes off as a bit plastic and superficial and doesn’t seem to be able to smile.

      Doesn’t compel me to join his peer group at all nor drive any car he drives. In fact just like the mullet’d Camaro crew of my youth I find myself with a strong desire to separate myself from them in both personal style and with what I drive. Doesn’t mean I can’t be friends with them, just don’t want to be like them.

  • avatar
    rwb

    Everyone loves it, huh? I was cringing. Pure schlock with that nice breathless veneer of the turnaround theme.
     
    All for the new Sebring.

  • avatar

    Definitely made me reconsider Chrysler. The pivot to luxury is an interesting gamble at best, laughable if it fails.
     

  • avatar

    Chrysler hit it out of the park with Motor City, leadership, panache, and aspiration. no zero percent, no rebates, just the message and the car…shades of Iacocca. nice job, and a tip of the hat from your friendly Buickman.

    Only negative is calling it the 200. Can’t build equity like on an Imperial. Pontiac died using alpha numerics and Lincoln Is suffering the same way. Whoever thinks this should continue is nuts. See Mulally going back to Taurus. Kill 200 nameplate asap!

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      Chrysler hit it out of the park with Motor City, leadership, panache, and aspiration. no zero percent, no rebates, just the message and the car…shades of Iacocca. nice job, and a tip of the hat from your friendly Buickman.

      Now we know what Buickman’s ad strategy would be for GM if he was given the keys to the kingdom.  And honestly I think it would work for certain GM vehicles.  For Cadillac (esp. the Escalade) for Buick LaCrosse and Lucerne, for the Impala and Silverado, if GM wanted to do a “Were American MFers, get over it” would actually play well. 

  • avatar
    340-4

    Great ad. Well done, Chrysler.
     
    Plus, y’know, I’d like to think that Detroit can rebuild itself just like Chrysler and the Sebring-200.
     
    I’ve checked out the car. It’s a huge improvement and looks great. Plus, it’s a lot of car for $25k.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      But… will it last or be all used up in 120K miles? My friend’s Sebring is a mess and the other brands they own have all been fine.
      Don’t think I’m being a snob b/c my VW has had it’s issues as well.

  • avatar
    cdnsfan27

    Those of you who have read my posts know that I’m a die-hard Ford man, I haven’t owned a Chrysler product since my 73 Dodge Charger but damn if that Chrysler ad didn’t give me goose bumps. Yes its an ad for Detroit and for Chrysler in general moreso than the 200…but it tells people that Chrysler is back and Detroit is coming back. If all you know about Detroit is what you get from the news and “Detroit 187″ then this is an eye opener. Kudos to Chrysler and its ad company.

  • avatar
    mtymsi

    Just based on the number of comments on this thread the ad was obviously an attention getter which is ultimately all any type of advertising can do.
     
    I have not seen a review of the 200 yet but I’m reading many comments saying that all it is is a Sebring. I would withhold my judgment on that until at least reading a review and looking at/driving the car.

  • avatar

    A classic…except for the car. Chrysler currently doesn’t have a car good enough – or at least perceived as good enough – to work in that spot.

    The backstory is that Eminem was as good as written off as yesterday’s news when he did last year’s Recovery album. It was a comeback as glorious as Elvis’s in ’68, Neil Sedaka in ’75 or Santana’s eleven years ago. From Eminem’s or Detriot’s standpoint, I think this was the absolute perfect time to produce this spot. Too bad Chrysler doesn’t have a compelling enough product to match. If this could’ve been pulled off when the 2004 300 was being rolled out, it would’ve been the modern-day video equivalent of “Somewhere West of Laramie”.

  • avatar
    jimboy

    @ bertel – A lot of luxury marques advertise their roots. Who doesn’t know that mercedes/audi/ porsche are german, or that ferrari is italian? Luxury makers advertise ‘german engineering’, and ‘italian style’, so your comments vis-a-vis not advertising nationality are incorrect. btw, I am proud to drive an ‘american vehicle’ that is actually built in Canada. For the 200 haters, this is not about selling the 200, per se, but moving Chrysler upmarket. Using the 200 was a risky move, but that is the vehicle that will be the volume seller for the brand in the future. This model is a stopgap until the new 200C arrives, but considering the work they put into the refresh of the sebring, I have high hopes for the next gen 200.(C)

  • avatar
    Motorhead10

    The ad was brilliant – simply because it generated the hype based on a questionable vehicle and a deserted city (PeriSoft’s earlier post was spot on). Perhaps any one who buys the vehicle or visits Detroit will feel duped.

    I imagine many of the B&B were in Detorit for the show a few weeks ago. The place was barren – it snowed several inches and there were no plows, nobody cleared the sidewalks (no stores occupied, so no store owners). It was an absolute mess. Obviously there are places on the planet that have it worse than Detroit – But for a motorhead, there is no more pitiful place on earth. Every time I go there, I feel like that native american dude crying by the side of the road in the pollution commercial of the 70s. Such a cool city with awesome auto history – and its like “Escape from New York” (You a cop? I’m an a**hole). Friend of mine that lives in Michigan was telling me his son just bought a condo in the downtown area – paid $7,000. Any way, I’m flying to Detroit with my sons in August for a Tigers game and the Dream Cruise.

    • 0 avatar
      mtymsi

      And the Dream Cruise isn’t in Detroit, it’s in the suburbs. Having lived in metro Detroit for all but two of my 56 years I have witnessed the complete destruction of a once vibrant city. I think Detroit is so dangerous I will not go near even the suburban borders. Not to mention how poor police response time is and EMS is even worse. Two thirds of EMS vehicles aren’t even on the road, they’re sidelined waiting for repairs and have been for at least the last six months.
       
      To venture into the city of Detroit is to put one’s life at substantial unnecessary risk.

    • 0 avatar
      faygo

      @mtymsi :
      sorry you’re so scared of the city.  I’ve _never_ felt uncomfortable, let alone unsafe in the city anytime I’ve been in the last 10 years.  park on the street, walk to venues, at night, after the bar, during the day, whenever.  I guess you either have an (irrational) heightened sense of fear or have had (or been told about and choose to think that is the norm) bad experiences.

    • 0 avatar
      mtymsi

      The fact of the matter is Detroit has a substantially higher violent crime rate than do its suburbs. This includes car jacking and armed robbery. How many times have you seen on the news people robbed and sometimes killed at a gas station?
       
      Also, the incidence of serious auto accidents is far higher in Detroit. Again, it’s a regular feature on the news to see vehicles crashed into houses and commercial buildings. Happens with way less frequency in the suburbs.
       
      Not too long ago they reported on vehicles being stolen parked around Detroit restaurants and suggested patrons park elsewhere. Really, where?
       
      Detroit’s suburban population is about four times what the city’s is yet there is no where near the amount of crime. Car jacking in the suburbs is a rarity, in Detroit it’s commonplace.

    • 0 avatar
      faygo

      @mtymsi :
      I don’t watch the local (or any for that matter) news, so I’m not forming my opinion based on that, rather my personal experience.
      as noted, I’ve never felt afraid while in town.  I’m not walking around with money hanging of my pockets nor usually driving jack-worthy cars, but you’re missing out if you irrationally avoid the entire city due to local news or statistics.  your loss – enjoy your insulated world in the suburbs.

    • 0 avatar
      mtymsi

      In other words you’re saying you are totally unaware of Detroit’s documented crime rate.
       
      Call it an isolated life in the suburbs if you want, to my mind it’s a much safer life. And btw, I’m only one of hundreds of thousands of people that feel that way.
       
      Why do you think Detroit’s population is a fraction of what it used to be? Why do most Detroit residences have iron grates on their doors and windows? You don’t see that in the suburbs.

    • 0 avatar
      faygo

      no, I’m not afraid of the city because it has a higher crime rate.  if one doesn’t put oneself into dangerous situations in dangerous areas (relatively speaking) then I don’t see the risk.
      your view is that to even set foot across the city lines is to court certain disaster, mine is to be prudent and enjoy what the city has to offer.  IMHO, it’s your loss, but that’s your call.  it’s unfortunate that that’s the choice to make, but you might drive a Sebring too, so everyone has a right to make poor choices :-)

    • 0 avatar
      mtymsi

      You seem to think that I’m in the minority of suburban people that will not go to Detroit. The fact of the matter is I’m in the vast majority.
       
      It isn’t as though the suburbs are sleepy bedroom communities, there is as much going on in the suburbs as in Detroit, probably more.
       
      If you think there’s a lot to do in Detroit now you should have seen it 30 or 40 years ago when it was a vibrant city. The fact of the matter today is you are at a substantially higher risk of being a crime victim in Detroit than in its suburbs and if you are a victim the police response time will be much slower. Let’s face facts here, the city of Detroit has lost so much of its population the current city administration is trying to consolidate what is left so they can provide the necessary municipal services. Today if you need EMS you may die (and people have) before they arrive because the coverage is so thin an ambulance may have to be called from the other side of the city. That doesn’t happen in the suburbs. Detroit has about 17 EMS ambulances active out of a fleet of about 45 with zero private ambulance companies.
       
      Detroit is a whole different world than its suburbs.

  • avatar
    Motorhead10

    let me correct my nits you choose to pick - I’m flying into Detroit Metro with my sons, going to a Tigers game at Comerica and going to Berkley, Bloomfield Hills, Bloomfield Township, Ferndale, Huntington Woods, Pleasant Ridge, Pontiac and Royal Oak for the Dream Cruise.

    • 0 avatar
      mtymsi

      Since this thread centers on the Chrysler Detroit commercial I am merely pointing out the Dream Cruise is not located within the city of Detroit not picking your nits.

  • avatar
    supremebrougham

    You think Detroit is bad? You should try spending some time out in Ypsilanti!!! My grandparents beautiful and somewhat picturesque subdivision, Gault Village, has in the last three years went from safe and family friendly to being full of thieves and drug dealers. Anymore, Ypsi is now referred to as “Little Detroit”. It’s a shame really, as it has so much wonderful history…
     
    I liked the ad. It kind of reminded me of the one Ford did back in 2000 where it showed all it’s brands and had Charlotte Church in it. I like ads that tug at the heart strings.
    And lastly, for the “scientific sample”, most of the people on my Facebook friends list from SEMI really liked the ad too.

  • avatar

    A good ad, perhaps even a great one — theatrically. Alas, I doubt it will do a damn bit of good for Chrysler.
     
    I really don’t think many people outside Michigan really care if Detroit lives or dies; those who might likely won’t be swayed by Eminem, or the 200. I need a better reason to consider a reimaged Sebring — the car’s merits, perhaps, if it has any? — and that wasn’t provided here.

  • avatar

    It beats the holy hell out of “If you can find a better car, buy it.” to which the only response is “Aye aye, sir.”

  • avatar
    VanillaDude

    It is a good ad and a good metaphor.
    Detroit is to cities what the Sebring is to cars.

    But there was one very misleading statement about “been to Hell and back” – as far as I am aware, Detroit has been to Hell, but it has not come back. The idea that Detroit has rebounded to what it used to be is an outright lie.

    Detroit is still an absolute failure and so it Chrysler.

  • avatar
    LectroByte

    Kunstlercast #143 pretty much ruthlessly deconstructs this commercial.
     
    http://www.kunstlercast.com/


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