By on October 11, 2010

A longtime critique of General Motors here at TTAC is that it needs to pick enduringly appealing names for its products and stick to them, instead of shuffling through some eighty nameplates for midsize and smaller cars since Toyota introduced the Corolla. Still, this approach doesn’t advocate simply freezing time, and calling every compact Chevy a Cruze from here to eternity. If you’re going to stick with a name, it has to be good, and it has to mean something.

Enter the Aveo, which is about to be replaced by another Daewoo-developed hatchback (made in the US this time), but should (if GM can be believed) represent an improvement over the unlovable outgoing model.GM’s North American supremo Mark Reuss is still wavering on the name, refusing to commit to Aveo, but unwilling to suggest an alternative nameplate. Which brings us to today’s question: is it nobler for the car to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageously poor associations with the name Aveo? Or should GM put the name to sleep, perchance to dream up a better, more enduring one? Is consistency good even if it means keeping one of the most maligned nameplates this side of “Sebring”? Aye, there’s the rub.

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84 Comments on “Ask The Best And Brightest: To Aveo, Or Not To Aveo?...”


  • avatar
    meefer

    Keep the Aveo name and don’t spend my money on a $5 million focus group test to find a new name.  I own GM for now, and this is how I vote.

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    This is too serious for sarcasm on my part: they cannot keep this name. The Aveo is the worst POS you can buy outside Asia today.  Even the Sebring is light years ahead of this sorry little tin can. First make (or resell) a car that doesn’t absolutely suck, then think about keeping the name. Never mind focus groups…any name, any name at all (other than perhaps Vega) will be an improvement.

  • avatar
    jpcavanaugh

    I am normally a fan of keeping a nameplate and building some equity into it.  But I am not sure about Aveo.  Upon reflection, I don’t really have any other good ideas.  It seems to me that they need to come up with vision of what Chevrolet is and base the universe of nameplates on that vision.  They had the idea of seaside luxury down in the 50s with BelAir, Biscayne, Del Ray and so on.  They are still selling Malibu.  But those don’t fit this car.  The Chevette was a pretty good name, but not a great car.  Ditto the Corsica.  Nova?  doesn’t do well in spanish.  Chevelle?  Chevy II?  I’m not feeling any of these.

    They have the Volt.  Howabout filling out the line with Amp and Ohm.  Or play off of the Impala – The Chevrolet Gnu or Antelope?  I’m out of ideas.  ChevroLite?  CheVroom?  Chevrolex (although that sounds like something that you would buy at the Ford parts counter.)  I’m out.

    Edit: Second wind: ChevroLittle? ChevroLess? ChevroLove? Seriously, though, Chevrolet needs some fresh names This would be a great TTAC article-ask the B&B to rename ALL of the Chevys.

    • 0 avatar

      Although the new Aveo might be good enough to warrant a name change, Hyundai/Kia have kept their odd assortment of names and managed to turn their reputation around despite them. So maybe GM could pull the same trick with the Aveo. Just maybe.

    • 0 avatar
      kjs

      jpcavanaugh: Nova?  doesn’t do well in spanish.

      Urban myth.

      dushenski: Hyundai/Kia have kept their odd assortment of names and managed to turn their reputation around despite them.

      Largely true; however, “Forte” is a new nameplate (replacing the forgettable Spectra, which replaced the equally forgettable Sephia).

    • 0 avatar
      Thinx

      They had the idea of seaside luxury down in the 50s with BelAir, Biscayne, Del Ray and so on.  They are still selling Malibu.  But those don’t fit this car.
      I don’t see why not – not all seaside towns have the same connotation.  They could name this after any of the hundreds of CA or FL seaside towns that have a more working-class, affordable and fun image.
      However, if the car is good, it can easily overcome the name.  Hardly anyone who shops for a Sonata today is actually thinking about the crappy 1st gen Sonata.  What matters is whether the new Aveo is any good.

    • 0 avatar
      Lokki

      “…BelAir, Biscayne, Del Ray and so on.  They are still selling Malibu.  But those don’t fit this car.
      I don’t see why not – not all seaside towns have the same connotation.  They could name this after any of the hundreds of CA or FL seaside towns that have a more working-class, affordable and fun image…”

      Call it the Cannery Row?

  • avatar
    gslippy

    Some nameplates must expire, such as Sebring.  I’m not so sure Aveo deserves the axe.
     
    Good nameplates have been ruined by subsequently bad/unloved cars – LeMans, CRX/Z, GTO, and 500 just to name a few.
     
    The Toyota Corolla example is a little different, since even the earliest versions were well-regarded at the time.  So there is no need to change a winning name.
     
    Hyundai has managed to keep the Elantra name going a very long time, after a rather spotty start.  If GM can improve the Aveo, then keeping the name might be OK to do.

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    Come on – Nova!
    Make a special edition with a six-tape-changer option and really tiny wheels.

  • avatar
    BDB

    They successfully salvaged the Malibu nameplate, so why not keep “Aveo”? I don’t think its anymore damaged than “Malibu” was in 2007.
     
    Now, if they really had balls they’d call it a Metro!

    • 0 avatar
      Patrickj

      Metro is actually a good idea, though they could do worse than keeping the Aveo name.  Never heard anybody complain about reliability of the Metro.

    • 0 avatar
      BDB

      I can’t comment on the reliability of the old Metro, but I do know it was a synonym for “cheap crap”, fair or not.

    • 0 avatar
      James2

      My late grandma had a Metro and I can’t imagine a worst POS. Actually, it’s still in the garage and, okay, it beats walking… but just barely.
      Keep the Aveo name. People who bought one obviously don’t know any better. If the new one’s any good, then it’s a pleasant surprise.

  • avatar
    mjz

    Corsa or Monza. Memo to Mark Reuss, please also waiver on the Buick Verano name. Call it the Calibra instead. Please.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Unfortunately, the Monza of the ’70s was one of the worst built cars ever foisted on the American public. It is a nice name, but some may be reminded. Corsa would be great. It was an uninspired little coal cart of an Opel, but not many know that here. The name sounds good. As for Calibra, I suppose it was a nice enough car in Europe, but it sounds almost as contrived as other recent GM proposals.

    • 0 avatar
      1600 MKII

      Hey – how ’bout Vega? Great name name, poor (-est) execution.
      But seriously, the Monza of the early – mid 60s was a pretty good car. I think Chevy should dig into the dustbin and choose a name – any name –  from the past that actually meant something…
      I mean, Brevia – Wha? Elantra? Corolla? The Japoreans can get away with this s**t because they’re not (or weren’t) expected to use something that spoke “western”.
      Metro? Still not bad…Coyote? American fer shore. Chamois? Another goat/antelope thing – should at least work in Europe. Corvair spoke of speed within a certain size range and also spoke Chevy-ese.
      Whatever – pullease – no more computer generated names….
      Just my thoughts
       

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      CJ, the Monza wasn’t known for exploding when rear ended or having the engine grenade at 50,000 miles.  For a small car in the 70s, that made it pretty decent.  And it wasn’t bad looking.  By today’s standards it wasn’t much of a car, but in it’s time it got more respect than an Aveo does today.

  • avatar
    Jimal

    Monza.
    Please send the check to:
    Jimal
    P.O. Box…

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      I like Monza but heck I don’t see anything wrong with Aveo either.  The first Corolla was not as good as a Corolla is today.  Build, improve, build, improve, its not that damn hard GM!

    • 0 avatar
      Jimal

      I agree, but if they’re going to change it…

    • 0 avatar

      +1 Jason – you and others hit on the heart of the matter. Bring it out and keep refining the hell out of it. How much did GM lose by establishing the Saturn brand with a decent if not notable car, then beat the crap out of it by failing to follow through with a world-class motor?

  • avatar
    Jason

    The problem isn’t the name…if they make a fine automobile today named “Aveo” now then the name will mean “good car” by 2020.  The point is the car, always the car.

  • avatar
    SV

    I actually don’t mind the name Cruze. To me it brings up images of “cruising” down Route 101 in a Bel-Air, which is probably something like what Chevy was going for. Of course the car itself doesn’t match those impressions at all, but…there you go.

    As for Aveo, I’m not sure what should be done about it. On the one hand, Chevy hasn’t had any truly good subcompact names in the past; on the other hand, Aveo doesn’t exactly have a good image. I suppose I do like a previous poster’s suggestion of Monza, though it seems almost too sporty-sounding for this car.

    Wasn’t Chevy toying around with renaming the new Aveo the Viva for a while? If they go back to the renaming idea, I bet that’s the name they’re using. For what it’s worth, I think it’s kinda blah; energetic, sporty and such, but also kind of girly.

    • 0 avatar
      M 1

      Yeah, I was thinking Cruze has a name that could still go places in the right hands, too. I suppose the current offering is as eminently forgettable as almost every other sedan on the market today, which means in my mind, at least, the name is recognized but has no particular association.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    I can go with Monza.  Has some history, wasn’t an especially bad car for its day, and it’s kinda fun to say.  Aveo, on the other hand is awkward to pronounce and it has a pretty poor reputation as the worst of the current eco mobiles.  Metro could work too.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      My Monza had the Vega engine. New Hampshire roads caused the front suspension to fall apart while I was driving it. Even when brand new, it stranded me on numerous occasions. AAA actually cancelled by road service due to excessive calls. I dumped the piece of crap after about 18 months of ownership.

    • 0 avatar
      Jimal

      And how old was was Monza when this occurred?

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      Brand new from the dealership. It was a 76. I think I got rid of it with less than 20k miles. I can’t remember all of the failures, but I think one was related to the transmission. Once, when it was in the shop for a warranty repair, the dealer loaned me a brand new Chevette and it died on me as well shortly after leaving the dealer. Not long after that, I started working as an engineer in the auto industry and observed first hand some of the problems in the assembly plants that led to the problems I had. I saw cars with with known issues get shipped without repairs in order to meet production.
       

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      mcs, my  girlfriend and I drove Pintos.  Do you really want to start trading 70’s small-car horror stories?  I’m not saying the Monza was a good car (we’re talking 70’s GM after all), but it wasn’t making headlines. You make a good point about the Vega engine, but at least the Monza had other engine options so they all didn’t suffer a premature death, and they didn’t have as bad a rep as the short-lived Vega.

  • avatar
    thirty-three

    Why don’t they call it a Chevy Sprint?  It was a better car than the Aveo.

  • avatar
    crm114

    Has any member of the TTAC crew seen a new Aveo (or whatever) in person? I’m curious as to whether it really looks this good in person, or if it’s a standard “good from afar, but far from good” GM.

    • 0 avatar
      BDB

      All the “New GM” interiors I’ve seen in person so far look (and feel) pretty damn good in person as well as in photos. Maybe people have pointed this out already, but not enough: Bob Lutz did wonders for GM interiors. From Rubbermaid parts bin to class-competitive and in some areas class-leading in a few years.

  • avatar

    I’d call it “The Star”…it’s bigger than it looks. hey GM, if you use this one I want compensation. you’ve stolen enough from me already.

  • avatar
    speedboatsteve1

    Korette
    Silkster
    Kimster
    Wondo
     
     

  • avatar
    Syke

    Keep Aveo.  Then if the car turns out to be as good as it has to be (to get over the previous generation) it’ll be fun watching the Aveo-haters choke.

  • avatar
    ciddyguy

    Not a bad looking car but not distinctive enough (too much like the Fiesta in shape/style) and that’s not necessarily a bad thing purely from a style POV but the drawback is it I think can be easily mistaken with the Fiesta in some cases.
     
    That said, Aveo is an OK name, I’d rather have them use something like the old Sprint name, or Metro (technically both were the same car, just different generations of the same), Vega is an OK name but I’ve always liked the Chevette (the original car despite it’s humble beginnings as a remade Vauxhaul/Opal Chavette/Kadett even though it was never a fabulous car back in the day but was not a bad car by GM standards) But it was the name itself that I like as well and I think it CAN work here as well.
     
    BTW, I test drove a red Aveo in I think 2006 and it was an OK car, nothing fabulous and not terribly sporty, nor speedy, the current Fiesta and Fit run circles around it from purely a performance perspective and its suspension was a bit on the soft side if I recall and I saw a blue one about a year ago who’d aged something major in about 2 years time (it was a badly faded metallic blue one too).
     

  • avatar

    I’d kill it with fire. The Aveo nameplate is damaged goods at this point.
    I’d see if Lacetti is being used somewhere in the US. It’s not like anyone outside of the Top Gear cult would be familiar with that name…

  • avatar
    akitadog

    Keep the Aveo name. Why? Because, outside of car enthusiasts and auto mags, no one has really even thought about the Aveo. I mean, the only people who even considered one were those who couldn’t afford anything else. The average commuter does not hate on the Aveo, if only because they don’t ever think about it. If anything, the Aveo suffered more from anonymity than the understanding of its poor quality by the masses. That understanding was reserved for the auto-insane, like us.
    If GM markets this striking hatch correctly, it will get people to pull the name from the deepest recesses of their brains and finally put a face to the name, as they say, “Oh, yeah, the Aveo. Looks pretty good.” It might even sway a few Fiesta/Mazda2/Fit intenders.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      @akitadog: +1
       
      This is true.  “Aveo” doesn’t really have any negative equity to it.  It hasn’t a lot of positive equity, either, mind you,  but what negative equity it has is associated with “Chevrolet” and not “Aveo”.
       
      People who buy them seem to like them and, personally, I’ve found to be an entirely capable subcompact that’s saddled with a powertrain a decade behind the competition.  Otherwise, it rides well, drives well enough and is very well-packaged (better than the Fiesta, at any rate).  Assuming the new one fixes the powertrain, it’ll sell well (and better than the Fiesta, if it’s not cramped).  You could scrap the name, but there’s no real point to doing so as, again, it’s the “Chevrolet” (and, by inference, “GM”) that’s the problem.

      For goodness sakes, though, don’t bring back any of the historical names. All of them, from the perspective of mainstream buyers, are tainted. Monza? Citation? Chevette? Metro? Sprint? Are you nuts? Anyone of the demographic likely to buy an Aveo will have instant flashbacks to any one of a number of clapped-out, craptastic GM econocars. Sure, you, the enthusiast, might fondly remember the Chevette you kept running through highschool, but the non-enthusiasts remember a very different, and much less pleasant, car.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick

      +1
      Exactly what I was thinking.
      Or they could go with ‘Gnat’ or ‘Sunfish’.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      psar…

      I am a Ford guy, I guess, so I like you am disappointed with the Fiesta package.
      Not sure how the web praise keeps coming.

      By the way, doesn’t this car look like a love child of the Subaru/Focus one night stand?

  • avatar
    Jeff Waingrow

    Jason: Couldn’t agree more. Is there a dumber name anywhere than Camry? Maybe Miata. The point is, make a good car and the name will come along for the ride.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      I must agree. It is the product. Camry started as a box on wheels with a stupid name, but it made the people who bought it happy and went from there. I had a girlfriend with a 1st generation Camry who was insulted when someone confused it with my Audi 4000S quattro. I was completely befuddled at the time, but now I understand her reasoning. Her previous cars were two pre-GM Saab 900s and a Jeep Cherokee, all of which stranded her regularly. For her, the Camry was a revelation: a car that could be counted on to get her where she wanted to go. She still had it five years later, long after I’d been through two Audis.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      The “Miata” name is interesting, Nowhere does the name appear on mine. It plainly says: MX5. As far as the name “Aveo” goes, although I like “Nova”, “Aveo” works as well, especially if it is a decent car. You see lots of them on the road, so someone likes them.

  • avatar
    Paul Niedermeyer

    I was fairly impressed with the overall package (roomy), and the interior, at the Paris show. It looks to be a very substantial improvement over the old Aveo. If it drives decently, this may be a reasonably competitive car.

  • avatar
    dougjp

    We should just stop “pussy footin’ around” about this. Call a spade a spade. Name GM’s new small car after the “greats” from GM’s past executives. The symbolism wouldn’t be lost on many taxpayers, I’m sure. And some may even buy it on the mistaken belief they would be helping get their bailout money back!
     
    Call it a “Wagoner”, he he :D
     
    Oh yeah, the entry level version with the most cost cutting would be called the “Henderson” model. And the version with the oversized chrome wheels would be the “Lutz” version!!

  • avatar
    Birddog

    Keep Aveo. Build the RS version. And make damn sure it looks exactly like the one pictured above with the power to back it up.
    Don’t MAKE me buy the Fiesta GM!

  • avatar
    Doc

    Unfortunately, the name should be dumped. It is not a bad name but you need to escape from the image of the last car. (I am taking everyone’s word for it that the previous Aveo was bad, I have not seen one up close or driven one).
    People could forgive Kia and Hyundai for cruddy cars because these were new companies (to the American consumer) so some misses are to be expected. GM has been making cars for too long to still not know how to build one yet.
    By the way, it drives me crazy when the name gets kept even thought the car has completely changed classes. Thunderbird comes to mind. Pontiac also did this with the Lemans name bringing it back as an economy car.

  • avatar
    pleiter

    When companies roil the waters with new names on every refresh, the knowledgeable  folks get suspicious, like the company is trying to sweep the name under the rug to avoid CR black balls. And the owners of said vehicles also have to explain why their vehicle doesn’t exist anymore. So roiling the name is a loser. Just go back to the last GM small-car  name that everyone lov

    • 0 avatar
      benzaholic

      Shall we assume your last sentence was cut off because there IS no “last GM small-car name that everyone loved”?
       
      Well, maybe there are names we liked, but not a GM small car we loved.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Aveo is fine. Like someone else posted, the car barely has name recognition among the wider population as it exists now. Only the folks whose credit is total crap or parents buying the cheapest car they can find for their kids to trash are aware of the Aveo or the Accent, or the Yaris for that matter. And again, like someone else posted, if the succeeding car is better than the first, the reputation will increase and even wash back on the older model (i.e. Civic, Accord, Corolla, etc.). Leave the name alone and concentrate on making the car great.

  • avatar
    obbop

    Chevy Capacitor.
    The hybrid version would be the Chevy Electrolytic Capacitor.
    The sub-editions instead of LX, EX, etc  could be the microfarad, picofarad, etc.
     

  • avatar

    Whether or not they rename it, it’s still an Aveo.  They might as well keep the name.

    It wasn’t so long ago most of Hyundai/Kia’s names were the worst cars on the road.  Most of their vehicles still bear their original names but little else.  Good products make the difference. 

    They can rename the LaCrosse back to LeSabre while they’re at it.  And can Verano for Skylark or Century.

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    Aveo is a meaningless name for a meaningless little car.  So I guess its a perfect match.  Or was, the new Aveo looks like tuners would have fun with it.  Maybe just up the ante and call it an Aveo CRX or something, and then eventually drop the Aveo name altogether.

  • avatar
    JuniperBug

    In 2008 the aircraft maintenance arm of Air Canada – up to that point referred to as Air Canada Technical Services (ACTS) – split off to form its own company. The new head honchos spent one million dollars developing a new name and logo. The resulting new name:

    Aveos.

    At least GM did it first and probably didn’t spend 7 figures on it.

  • avatar
    niky

    Anybody who thinks there’s no negative equity in the Aveo name obviously hasn’t had the misfortune of experiencing the car. No Corolla was ever this bad. Poor handling, no power, poor economy despite having no power. It was a singularly horrible car whose only saving grace was that it was somewhat competently screwed together.
     
    Chevrolet should signal a clean break with its Daewoo roots by giving this car a new name. Viva is fine. Avia would probably work.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      Avia = Aveo just like Festiva = Fiesta.
      Yeah – you’re going to confuse people.
      Keep the name, fix the car. I don’t mind the current car but give it a better engine (MPG) and put something larger than 13″ tires on it. Maybe 14″ at least. Doesn’t need 17″ wheels though Encroaches on the interior.

  • avatar
    SunnyvaleCA

    Judging by the size of the front grill, they should call it the Aveo Clubsport….
    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/audi-a3-tdi-clubsport-to-burn-oil-rubber/

  • avatar
    dwford

    Bad names can be rehabilitated. Witness the Ford Taurus. Or the Nissan Altima, or the Infiniti name. Or Buick. Or Cadillac. Good cars marketed well solve everything.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    Well, for starters, from what, exactly, is the word Aveo derived? Does it have a meaning? It just seems like a bunch of letters thrown together.

    Which brings up the second point: it’s a four-letter word with three vowels that all need to be pronounced. Doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue.

    Finally, it sounds a little too close to that other rolling turd, the Suzuki Aerio (even though it was replaced a few years back by the SX4).

    I say scrap Aveo and come up with something with a little more meaning or, at least, is easier to pronounce. Personally, I’d like to see something outré, like ‘Varmint’. Hell, it couldn’t be any worse than ‘Soul’, ‘Cube’ or ‘Juke’.

  • avatar
    Amendment X

    I liked the Chevrolet Spark name, kinda has that catchy, uplifty feel you are supposed to get from owning a small car. Isn’t a Chevy Spark is coming as a different model?

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    I’d go with a little history, so Nova or Monza would do.  Aveo was complete rubbish…flush that name.

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    From a different perspective – how much does it really matter? Before I started reading ttac, as I was looking for my saab, I had no perception of segments, cross-shopping, platforms, facelifts, or anything else. I lookes based on price, specs, and features. Particularly at the low end, you have to remember that buyers do -not- see the car world like enthusiasts. The incessant industry navel-gazing probably does more harm than good at the low end. I looked at Sonatas because I rented one and liked it, and thought they looked awesome for the price. I knew nothing and cared naught for Hyundai’s industry resurgence, its repositioning itself in the market – blah, blah. Show me the car.

    The fact is that 99% of car buyers use names for reference only. Unless you try to sell the Crapwagon SX, I suspect that the enthusiast sound and fury signifies nothing.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    There is no reason to waste a new name on this generation Aveo. Built by the UAW, it will offer a worse ownership experience than previous Aveos. Buying 17 inch tires won’t be a treat for budget customers either.

    • 0 avatar
      John Horner

      Chevrolet builds a whole lot of well respected trucks using UAW workers as does Ford.

      By the logic that UAW = bad, non-UAW = good, F150s and Silverados should be gathering dust on dealer’s lots whilst all the smart customers are buying non-union built Nissan Titans and Toyota Tundras.

  • avatar
    John Horner

    Come on GM, have some stones and call it a Vega! Almost nobody in the target market for one even remembers the original Vega :).

  • avatar
    nichjs

    (Note: I’ve not had time to read every comment, so ‘pologies in advace if this is repetitious.)
    This is actually a very profound dilemma for GM, and will be a litmus for whether the “new GM” as a misnomer or not.
    The decision to reuse the Aveo nameplate is really a commitment thing:  Is GM willing to build a car which they will then endeavour in improve andimprove with each iteration?  Are they going to embrace continuous procuct devemlopment improvement, and create a saga of improving vehicles, just as the rising stars Kia and Hyundai have?  Someone has already mentioned the Camry, they were tinny, but the name *now* represents a quality product (whether it’s your cup of tea or not).  imagine how seriously the design/engineering team take the task of re-designing the mondeo / passat / taurus / fiesta / F100 and so on.  there’s a real heritage to live up to, and to beat.  This is the culture which will create saleabnle cars, and keep Generous motors in business, maybe even (gasp) returning some money to all you US tax payers!! (I’m a brit, so in equal fiscal penury, just on t’other side of the pond).
     

  • avatar
    7th Frog

    I say call it a Nova. I, for one, have some great memories of that nameplate. Growing up my Mom drove a 69 Nova that my parents had painted silver and black. I loved that car. I also owned and drove a 1987 Chevy/Toyota Nova during my college years complete with “SS” stickers. It was a manual with no power steering and no A/C. Many great memories when I owned that car and the aveo sort of resembles it.
    Monza is good, too.
    I think it looks better than the fiesta, BTW.

  • avatar
    GrandCharles

    Ditch that name plate, use one already inhouse, like 7th frog said: Nova or maybe bring back Metro or sprint, there not as much hate for these two compared to pissed off aveo owner about to renew their location or purchase…

  • avatar
    mjz

    Chevy is going to introduce a car smaller than the Aveo that will be called the Spark.

  • avatar
    Nick

    Or they could adhere to the principle of truth in advertising and call it the Chevy Low Financing.

  • avatar
    Nick

    Back in era best forgotten, there was an execrable captive import called the Vauxhall Viva.
    If GM still owns the name, I think Chevrolet should call this the Viva.


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