By on September 16, 2010

If you want to offer hybrid cars, but don’t have the money / time / run rate / wherewithal to do it yourself, who’re gonna call? Toyota. But who would have imagined that haughty Daimler picked up the phone, dialed 0081, and said: “Let’s talk?” Daimler considers joining the growing list of automakers that source their hybrid systems from Toyota City.  Toyota is in talks to provide technology and core components for hybrid vehicles to Daimler, after having been approached by the Germans, says The Nikkei [sub].

Toyota might sell Daimler motors and batteries, “in addition to technology.” The Nikkei further heard that “the automakers will also consider forming a broad alliance that would also cover cars powered by fuel cells.”

That’s probably a feel-good move to make Daimler engineers think they can bring parts to the party as well. And wasn’t Daimler in bed with China’s BYD for EV breeding purposes? Something that bugged Daimler’ Chinese joint venture partner BAIC? Or maybe the falling fortunes of BYD have prompted Daimler to look for a more dependable partner to electrify their cars?

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10 Comments on “Daimler’s Next Hybrids: Made By Toyota...”


  • avatar

    SHOCKING!! hehehe. had to do it.

  • avatar
    jimboy

    What happened to the hybrid program developed by  DCX, GM, etc…, the one used on trucks? The people at Daimler/Mercedes seem particularly clueless lately when it comes to engineering. Maybe they were relying on Chrysler too much for that?

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      That would be the two-mode system.  it’s a good product: a full hybrid system that drops into an existing car and can handle a lot of torque.
       
      The problem is that the two-mode transmission is a big bastard: it fits in the GMT900 and was, barely, used in the Chrysler Aspen.  I don’t think it would fit in any passenger car; it was supposed to be scaled down to fit in the Vue hybrid, but I don’t think it ever made it.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      It’s in Daimler’s MB M-class hybrid.

  • avatar
    Dr Strangelove

    Wasn’t there some hype recently about Nissan’s new hybrids leaving Toyota’s in the dust, and didn’t Daimler form an alliance already with Renault/Nissan?
    Daimler seems to be wandering around a little aimlessly of late.

    • 0 avatar
      iNeon

      HAH! “of late”
       
      Comedy this delicately transparent is hard to come by, Mister Strangelove. Quite hard to come by. You deserve a medal.
       
      In other news: Just one more reason to stay away from Daimler and Toyota both. Daimler for being an ‘engineering’ company that can’t engineer– and Toyota for being sad sacks-of-shit, whoring themselves to any old John for a buck. Anyone founding relationships with Daimler after the DCX years has no morals or values, and should be scrutinized accordingly.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    Maybe Honda should make the same choice.
     
    Oh wait, then they’d still have to surround the hybrid drivetrain with an interesting car.

  • avatar
    Paul Niedermeyer

    Let’s not forget that both Daimler and Toyota have a stake in Tesla.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    I’d rather call the Ghostbusters.

  • avatar
    chitbox dodge

    Why is it that most every car company out there refuses to do their own homework anymore? Toyota, the Koreans, and Ford seem to be the only ones left who don’t pay to crib, and even then there is quite a bit of overlap in makes.
    I guess this is just another sign of the times. We just can’t have hugely exhorbitant corporate salaries and sound “in-house” engineering fundamentals at the same time. The more I think of how cheap these guys operate, the more it makes me want to get out of my car and walk.


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