By on September 16, 2010

Since TTAC is already “noted for dissing its mainstream competitors for cosseting carmakers,” we might as well not try to resist temptation on this one… because Car And Driver may have just outdone themselves. It starts with the one of the best headlines in ages:

10Best Surprise: Plastics Make the Chevy Volt’s Interior Possible

Surprise? Where? But in spite of the painfully unambitious headline, what follows is a symphony of strange. The ultimate point of which appears to be that C&D is absolutely thrilled about GM’s decision to make the Volt’s interior out of plastic. Yes, really.

After noting that plastic is ubiquitous in cars, but is “usually disguised as burled walnut or carbon fiber or anything but what it is,” C&D offers the photo shown above as evidence that Volt’s center stack represents “industrial design at its best” (an epithet that is now apparently synonymous with “looks like an iPod”). Ditto the doors, which according to C&D achieve that old design school trope “embodying the material.”

Plastic, by definition, is wonderfully malleable. The Volt’s door panels, for example, take full advantage of this, being shaped and modeled into a form that’s both attractive and practical.

Now, to be perfectly fair, I have not personally experienced the Chevrolet Volt… but this is a $40,000 car. As much as I share the author’s distaste for fake wood and carbonfiber, the prejudice doesn’t make me any more likely to rave over the plastic-happiness of any interior at the Volt’s asking price. A main reason so many automakers put fake wood and carbonfiber (and the good ones use the real stuff) is because plastic is impersonal, industrial and ubiquitous… all unwelcome adjectives at the $40k price point. The not-so-old saying “the medium is the message” applies here, and the message is that the Volt isn’t all that different from a Cruze. As this image illustrates, the Volt’s interior is clearly more pleasingly designed than the Cruze’s, but it’s not the difference between a Cruze and a CTS, or  better yet, a Sentra and a G37.

Luckily for the Volt, its drivetrain would pull in early adopters even if the interior were made out of old tupperware and duct tape. And, as C&D as much as admits, the Volt will be bought in spite of aesthetics anyway because

the car’s exterior… is aesthetically confused and not up to the rest of the advanced design.

In light of this, perhaps C&D could have focused on (say) the touch-sensitive controls for its Voltaic “Surprise” instead of trying to bring plasticky back.

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79 Comments on “C&D’s “Surprise” Plastic Paean To The Volt...”


  • avatar

    The Cruze’s interior is pretty nice. Upper trim levels have fabric on the IP.
    I dropped by a Lincoln dealer to check out similar touch-sensitive controls in the new MKX last week. A salesman informed me that the car is on hold as Ford races to fix software glitches.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      The upper trim levels also bring the Cruzes sticker to the same price range as the Sonata. No thanks.

    • 0 avatar

      I agree Mike… Looks good. I’m also glad they didn’t go with the silly popup Navigation system. It seems like such a ridiculous waste.   didn’t like it on the Audi’s, don’t like it here either.

      I am wondering how well those touch sensitive buttons work. Seems to me they would activate even if you didn’t want them to with an accidental touch.

      It would be cool if they had some type of give, or haptic feedback.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      Michael -
      That’s news to me (about apparent software glitches that is).  We’ve had 2011 MKXs on the lot for a couple weeks now and they work fine, and I haven’t heard anything about a recall, nor are there any outstanding service items listed for any of the ones I just pulled up in this area.

    • 0 avatar
      segfault

      mcs, that’s nearly always been true of fully loaded smaller cars.  A small car with heated leather, satnav, automatic, and a sunroof is not a value proposition and will likely cost more than a stripped Camry or Sonata.

    • 0 avatar
      aspade

      A Cruze with those options stickers over $25,000.
      Never mind strippers, that’s within a couple hundred bucks of a Sonata Limited.
      “Not a value proposition” indeed.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      segfault, that sort of pricing works when you’re getting more content in the smaller car than the bigger car. For example, I’m sure you’ll be able to price a new Elantra up to that price (24k) range, but if you do you’ll probably get the xenons, rear heated seats, and the automatic parking. The Snuze at that price range has almost the same equipment as a similarly priced Sonata.

      It’ll get worse with some of the 2011 Optima pricing models I’ve seen. I went on the 2011 Optima preliminary configuration site and a 24k Optima (EX + premium package and the same price Chevy has been flashing on the screen in Cruze ads) has heated and cooled front seats, heated rear seats, and heated steering wheel. C’mon – you can’t even get that stuff on the Snuze.

    • 0 avatar
      segfault

      mcs,
       
      That’s impressive pricing on the Optima.  When I configured an EX with the Premium package, it came to $25,100, so perhaps they’re still experimenting with pricing.  Either way, I’m not sure many people will pay $24k for a Cruze.

    • 0 avatar
      jaje

      If history repeats itself GM will soon pile on incentives.

  • avatar
    slow kills

    If this doesn’t have an oleophobic coating like later iPod touchscreens, the fingerprints will start showing immediately and it will look like trash.
    I can’t get into the gloss.  I’d so much prefer a light knurled texture of some sort that doesn’t feel slippery and reflect light.

    • 0 avatar

      I’m very certain they wouldn’t make this without an oleophobic coating.

    • 0 avatar
      ash78

      Oleophobic or not, I simply despise glossy surfaces in cars (and home A/V, but that’s another rant).
       
      In cars, it’s downright dangerous when the sun hits it just right.

    • 0 avatar
      DuManchu

      @ash78
      Agreed, my wife’s 09 Ford Edge has fake chrome accents scattered throughout the cabin that can create horribly dangerous reflections.  We were driving around a few weeks back, and I was nearly blinded by the reflection from the chrome accents around the shifter.  I had to cover it with a rag in the car so I could actually see the road.

      To give an example how bad it was, think of a CD left in the passenger seat that reflects the sun just right when you’re driving, then amplify that just a little.

  • avatar
    Steve65

    Uh… “industrial desing at its best”? Seriously? It’s industrial design at its worst. Apparently, the C and D writers live in a world where screen-printed labels never wear off plastic surfaces. Out here in the real world, that center stack has about a 3 year lifespan before it reaches the point wherre the user had better damned well know what each button is for, because the markings are going to be gone. With no way to repair except replacement with a new (and equally short-lived) stock item, or hand-labeling the buttons. Buy stock in the company which makes Sharpies.

    • 0 avatar
      galaxygreymx5

      I suspect these “buttons” are backlit and, if so, they’re not screen printed.  As a detailer I’m accustomed to garbage GM plastic surfaces wearing very quickly but I don’t know that this will be one of them.

  • avatar
    mcs

    A truly green interior would have used bamboo. If Asus can make a laptop with it, GM should been able to use it for at least part of the Volt’s interior – it is after all a 41k eco mobile.
    http://event.asus.com/notebook/bamboo/index2.html

    • 0 avatar

      unfortunately hundreds of acres of virgin forests are being stripped for bamboo because of its newish “green” status.
       
      Its great on its own, but it too has terrible repercussions.

    • 0 avatar
      mpresley

      “…unfortunately hundreds of acres of virgin forests are being stripped for bamboo because of its newish “green” status.”
       
      Oh my God!.  First it was the whales.  Then the rain forests.  Now it’s bamboo.  What happens when  birds start getting their beaks stuck in all this plastic, and the landfills can’t dispose of it all?  Oh, the humanity!

    • 0 avatar

      You miss my point mpresley.
       
      I don’t care if people use bamboo, but people are selecting it because of its “green” reputation (which it earned as it is highly sustainable once it is planted).  I don’t care if they use it (i plan on using it as flooring in my home) but its the reactions to the very panics that you mention that are not well thought out.
       
      Every time someone panics over something (needing to replace plastic with bamboo) the result will almost always be something worse or as bad.

    • 0 avatar
      mpresley

      Bamboo is a grass.  It grows like grass and can be harvested quickly, reseeded, and propagated.  I once had some in my back yard–the stuff grows like a weed.  But all this is ridiculously moot when we can have some nice and shiny real-live plastic on a car that would sell for 40 large or even more if it were not for government intervention in the marketplace.  In fact, if GM did use bamboo, it’d be the best thing about the Volt.  Oh well, at least with a Volt you don’t have to worry about dealing with yucky plastics for long, since the damn thing only goes 40 miles a pop–that is, as long as you don’t turn on the AC, or the high powered Dolby Digital hi-fi, in which case you won’t have to look at the plastic for even that long.  What an abortion.  Good going, GM.

  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    At least you don’t see this ABS Corgi plastic on a $40,000 car.  Oh wait, this is a Volt, not an Aveo.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    What an interface nightmare.
     
    The iPod works because you’re always looking at it when you use it and because it’s a simple, one-wheel control that does one thing: parse categories of music and media.  It works really well when you’re walking or sitting or whatever and it’s your sole focus.  It’s exactly the kind of ergonomics you don’t want in a car.
     
    On one hand, you have BMW and Audi, which has a similar menu structure, but require you to look away from the road for long periods to navigate the tree.  It’s the same interface style, but you’re controlling all sorts of functions.
     
    Then you have this, which is iPod like in it’s lack of tactile feedback.  Or rather, it’s lack of tactile feedback.  On the iPod this is ok because you’re always giving it full attention.  In a car, this is stupid.  Deeply stupid.  It doesn’t matter if it was made of plastic, metal, wood or unobtanium: having poor tactile feedback in a car is a dumb thing.
     
     
    Want to see good controls in a car?  Have a look at a Camry LE: big, chunky, ugly dials and buttons that you can operate with mitts on without looking at them.  This smacks of the same logic that sees other electronics companies trying to knock the iPod off it’s perch by matching features and design elements all while ignoring the human interface theory that makes the iPod a success.
     
    Personally, I don’t mind that it’s plastic.  Many, many modern car buyers don’t care, either: the idea that “wood+leather = luxury” is rapidly becoming an anachronism.   Good human interface design, though, never goes out of style.

    • 0 avatar
      Silvy_nonsense

      “Want to see good controls in a car?”

      No, actually I don’t want to see them at all. I shouldn’t have to use my eyes nor should I have to take my hands off the wheel to adjust climate and entertainment controls. Buttons and knobs aren’t going anywhere anytime soon, but focusing on center stack design isn’t where it’s at anymore.

      Ford’s SYNC voice recognition is an example of “good controls in a car”. Voice recognition is safer and doesn’t involve deciphering befuddling pictograms. If you are concerned about safety and ease of use it doesn’t get any safer than keeping your eyes on the road, your hands on the wheel and simply saying what you want.

      “Many, many modern car buyers don’t care, either: the idea that “wood+leather = luxury” is rapidly becoming an anachronism.”

      That’s just ridiculous. When entry level cars have leather seats and the top of the line spec includes vinyl seats, then you might convince me that plastic is important to luxury car buyers. Name one car that could conceivably be considered a luxury car that has eschewed the use of leather, wood or carbon fiber in lieu of plastic as its used in the Volt. I can’t think of a single luxury car brochure, TV or magazine ad that has ever bragged up “plastic” as a luxury finish nor do I know of a single person who has ever said “Why can’t they just use more plastic instead of this awful wood and leather?”

    • 0 avatar
      Z71_Silvy

      Ford’s SYNC voice recognition is an example of “good controls in a car”.
       
      Yeah…..when it works.  It needs A LOT of work.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      No, actually I don’t want to see them at all. I shouldn’t have to use my eyes nor should I have to take my hands off the wheel to adjust climate and entertainment controls.

      Good luck with that.

      SYNC isn’t bad, but it’s not great, either.  It’s certainly not as easy as twisting a knob for heat, fan speed or volume, or press a preset for a radio station.  Voice control has been “just around the corner” for years, along with handwriting recognition; grabbing a big knob that’s within your sightlines, meanwhile, works really well.

      There’s no need to discard a control model that works really well.  You’re right that it’s not going anywhere, but don’t look for something like SYNC to supplant tasks that a knob can do better anyway.

      When entry level cars have leather seats and the top of the line spec includes vinyl seats, then you might convince me that plastic is important to luxury car buyers

      Look how many cars are moving away from leather or wood and to things like brushed aluminum, piano-black, high-gloss enamel, clearcoat or creative illumination.  Wood-and-leather is a last-century luxury paradigm, inherited from horse coaches and furniture.  Modern concepts of luxury are being driven by high-end consumer electronics.

      And yes, you can ape this look with plastic, just as we’ve been aping wood and leather with plastic.  Instead of plood and pleather, we get plaluminum and plarbon fiber.  The nice part, if you can say it that way, is that plastics are better at looking like metal or CF than vinyl is at looking like leather, or resin like wood.

    • 0 avatar
      tbp0701

      My first thought at looking at the photo is that the slew of similarly-shaped tiny buttons will probably necessitate more stringent crash test and e-nannie regulation.

    • 0 avatar
      talkstoanimals

      @Z71_Silvy – I’ve been living with Synch for about a year now and it works extremely well.  What makes you say it needs a lot of work?

    • 0 avatar
      MikeAR

      Psar, I got to say it, when you are right, you do get it almost perfect. It’s a shame about politics, but in most everything else about cars, you do get it right.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      @psar: +1 on everything you said.

  • avatar
    eastcoastcar

    Be interesting when all those little narrow buttons get finger residue and dust around the button opening, and more interesting when that flexible circuit board behind all those buttons starts to fail in the heat over time.   This is not a modular car that is for sure.  The owner will be hung with maintaining an electric drive train, transmission, and battery as well as a gasoline engine and  A/C, etc.  Let’s see if this car can be on the road for 10 years.

    • 0 avatar
      BryanC

      Those aren’t narrow little buttons.  They’re capacitive.  The bumps you see are just indicators as to where you should put your finger, but there’s no actual pushing on the button to actuate anything.
      This brings up a different set of problems, since if you have gloves on (in the winter, for example), your gloved finger will not actuate the capacitive sensor.
      But still – there’s no need to physically depress those narrow little bumps, they’re not buttons.

    • 0 avatar
      SunnyvaleCA

      <i>”Those aren’t narrow little buttons.  They’re capacitive.  The bumps you see are just indicators as to where you should put your finger, but there’s no actual pushing on the button to actuate anything.”</i>
      One method of navigation is to feel for the buttons.  But you are saying that the act of just feeling for where to position your fingers is going to activate the buttons?  Cars get more ridiculous all the time.

  • avatar
    Sinistermisterman

    Shiny plastic. Niiiiiiice. Just wait until the sun shines in through the side window and you want to skip to the next track on your CD… instead of button labeling, all you’ll be able to see is a fantastically shiny mass of plastic from all the reflected light.
    Oh well, at least it’ll be dribble proof.

  • avatar

    That console looks like it would last the life of the car… so, maybe two years?

  • avatar
    Nick

    GM…ENOUGH WITH GREY ALREADY!!!

    • 0 avatar
      talkstoanimals

      Amen!  The fetish for grey plastic interiors has been my biggest gripe with GM since the ’90s.  At least they’ve stopped using those awful, jello-mold, light grey knobs and swtiches, though.

  • avatar

    I’m okay with not trying to make the plastic look like carbon fiber or wood or rhinoceros horn, but some taste and ergonomics would be nice.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    1) That looks like a check in kiosk at the airport. 2) Those buttons will be great when driving with gloves.  3) $33k for that interior?!?!

    • 0 avatar
      GarbageMotorsCo.

      LOL! I was actually going to comment how the plastic looks like the same quality that comes on the tv screens on a 727 which have been in service since the 60′s.

      Reeks of cheap.

  • avatar
    Hank

    “an epithet that is now apparently synonymous with ‘looks like an iPod’”
     
    Hey now, I have a second gen iPod Shuffle…made of aluminum…and an iPhone 4 made of glass and aluminum.  The Volt only wishes it were made of such good materials.

    If you ask me, the Volt IP looks more like the TV/bed remote combo on a hospital bed.

  • avatar
    Boff

    Once, on another message board, I waxed rhapsodic about the “sumptuous rubberized vinyl” that our BMW’s interior is constructed out of. Hoo-boy I caught some flak for that…
    I do find it odd to see C&D slagged (again!) for praising something the editor of this site has not even sat in. I wouldn’t be too impressed to read someone criticize a movie they hadn’t seen just because Roger Ebert reviewed it favourably.

  • avatar

    Body by Fisher.  Interior by Fisher-Price.

  • avatar

    That’s decent looking plastic, there’s just too much of one casting.  The shiny stuff should frame another “grain” of plastic, preferably with a thin strip of a third finish (like chrome) separating the two.  You know, for $40,000.
    Like most GM products, its not the material…it’s the execution.

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    The Volt’s dash looks like a fancy PDA. Perhaps that’s the intent. It doesn’t float my boat.

  • avatar
    folkdancer

    Many cities or counties here in Arizona are passing laws against texting while driving.

    It will be hilarious when we start having laws saying we can’t use dashboards while driving.

  • avatar
    mistrernee

    Oooo… Dolby Digital and DTS!  Those are two very important bits of information that needed to be on the centre console.
     
    I hope those are stickers that peel off, but if not I really hope they light up bright blue all the time and don’t get dimmed at night.

    • 0 avatar

      Having the logos light up all the time would — of course — be counterproductive to the Volt’s ostensible goal of conserving fuel and utilizing electricity to result in a more efficient, yet still usable, real-world vehicle.
       
      It would also reveal hilarious lack of foresight and gross incompetence on the part of today’s GM.
       
      So yes, it’s a safe bet they all light up. I wouldn’t be surprised to see neon lighting under all the seats, too.

  • avatar
    CliffG

    I think this is like the video of the kids passing the ball, and since you are asked to count how many passes you fail to notice the gorilla walking through the middle.  While y’all are worried about the buttons, the knuckle basher shifter is being overlooked.  Only people with small hands and paying close attention need apply?  Or is shoving the gear lever into the tunnel some sly, er, not so sly, er, head in gutter, sorry.  I’ll leave now.

  • avatar
    obbop

    I liked the dash of my 1969 Dodge Dart.
    Still miss it.
     

  • avatar
    newfdawg

    GM is obviously trying to make the interior look like an I-Pod.  That shiny expanse of plastic
    may look good now, but wait until it gets covered with a nice layer of dust.  Better yet, wait about
    three years when all the screen printing begins to wear off and that shiny plastic gets covered
    with scratches.  That’s enough to turn me off the Volt already.

  • avatar
    segfault

    Way too much shiny plastic, and way too many controls with no tactile feedback.  What works for an iPod doesn’t work so well for a car.  Also, Apple would never have the “Dolby Digital,” “DTS,” and “DVD” advertising logos displayed, for the same reason they don’t let Intel pay them to put “Intel Inside” advertising on their computers:  It’s tacky.

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    I’m not sure what the deal is with TTAC and plastic. There aren’t many alternatives – you’ve got plastic, dead thing (either wood or cow), and metal. That’s it. Unless you’re going to make the whole interior out of dead thing and metal, it’s gonna have some plastic in it. Probably mostly. Complaining that something has “lots of plastic” is absurd; complaining that it has the wrong kind of plastic makes a bit more sense. TTAC writers seem to confuse the two, or expect readers to automatically parse the former as the latter.

  • avatar
    441Zuke

    parking brake is intresting. not really for so many buttons  i am a firm believer of knobs hvac and whats with the feather button. I like the big blue button it starts the car i guess

  • avatar

    I have sat in the Volt and can say the interior (and the whole car) is genuinely impressive in person.  Much more so than you would get by looking at this photo online.  The centerstack was really styled to be a contrasting color though so the available black or iPod white would look much better.

  • avatar
    Z71_Silvy

    Looking at that picture…the only issue with it is that GM is doing something incredibly stupid and following a Ford example and using this “hardly thought out” touch capacitive technology.
    And any place where the temp gets below 50 will have issues with this ill-conceived technology.
     
    These automakers are really not doing any good by having form before safety and function.
     
     

  • avatar
    MarkySparky

    What’s the over/under for number of times the average Volt owner will activate hazards whilst attempting to eject a CD?  I say fifteen.  Eject goes on the right!!!!!
    2003-vintage Buicks light up different buttons when playing different media sources (no need for “SCAN” to be lit when playing a tape).  Why couldn’t GM have made the dash flat and (mostly) blank, with backlighting for labels as needed (al la macbook charge light)?  That seems like a natural evolution of the technology…  The “always visible/printed labels” are only needed for primary functions (sound/nav power, hazards, vehicle start, etc), not “<<SEEK” or “RPT”.  Those should not be visible unless it is likely i will need to need “INFO” or “CONFIG” in the next 0.25 second rightward glance while driving.  If you can reduce heater valve knobs to capacitive chicklets, you can damn sure leave the ugly GM sans serif off of them!
    Verdict: this looks like the demon spawn of a LiteBrite and a microwave, but damn if people don’t dig shiny interiors in their new car. ;)

  • avatar
    geggamoya

    Mmm…. Graynuts..

  • avatar
    HoldenSSVSE

    Stunning amounts of hatred for the Cruze and Volt coming from people who have never even sat in a Cruze or Volt.

  • avatar
    Da Coyote

    Using my extensive experience as a beta tester for GM (e.g., I was stupid enough to purchase one of their productsw) , they have a long and distinguished tradition of not getting things right on the first, the second, and even the third try.  Their one engineer is vastly outnumbered by the zombi Obamatypes and clueless MBAs who know nothing about making things at all, let alone making things work properly.
    May they and their Volt rest with the Yugo.
     

  • avatar
    ronin

    Splendid, now it’s only a matter of time until the 73 Vega interior receives its proper due.
     

  • avatar
    jdmcomp

    Two things going on here, one is the expectation that govt will wind up buying the vast majority of these abominations and so they cannot look too good and secondly, those sold to the public will be bought by the extreme left enviros who just love showing off by wearing a hair shirt to prove their credentials.

  • avatar
    M 1

    I don’t think a single commenter replied to the actual point, which was that C&D is positively giddy about The Miracle of Plastic. Maybe they recycled an article from the 50′s. Either way, if it wasn’t for TTAC, I wouldn’t know what C&D thinks about anything, as it has never been on the worth-my-time list.

  • avatar
    Steven02

    Are plastics welcome at a 32k price point?  I am sure the Leaf is going to have a good amount of plastic as well.
    I am not sure it is a bad thing when I see it in the volt.  It looks nice if you ask me.  I know how many complain about ugly plastics, but I don’t see this as an ugly plastic.  Now righting an article praising plastic for looking like plastic is odd.
     
     

  • avatar

    Doesn’t anyone else see the irony here? They’re making an electric car because the world is running out of oil. So they take all that oil saved by not having a piston-pony under the hood and use it on the dashboard? Brilliant!

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      You expect cars to be made with no plastic?

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      The world is not running out of oil.  If it were so, inflation-corrected prices wouldn’t be the same as they were in 1973: http://www.inflationdata.com/inflation/images/charts/Oil/Gasoline_inflation_chart.htm.  There are other forces at work.

      The Volt does have a gasoline engine.  It just won’t use as much gasoline as others.

      Every car has plastic in its interior.  It’s just that the Volt could do it better.

    • 0 avatar
      srogers

      I believe that the current price of oil depends on how much suppliers have stockpiled and how bad they want to sell it vs. how much demand there is to buy it.
      Price is a pretty poor indicator of how much oil remains in the Earth.

  • avatar
    Audi-Inni

    It’s impressive, or perhaps not, that you (Ed) can blog so emphatically about an interior you haven’t even seen.  The picture is just of the center stack – there appears to be more traditional plastic (vinyl), which it seems you approve of more, on the dash. Just can’t miss an opportunity to get your digs in to the mainstream rags – even when it’s not warranted, eh?

  • avatar
    deco_droid

    I’m sort of surprised as the new GM “halo” car, the Volt dash is so similar to other GM dash designs i’ve seen lately – i.e. the tall center area with the two trapezoidal air vents look.  Do you have to order a Camaro to at least get a unique design?

  • avatar

    Steven02: “You expect cars to be made with no plastic?”

    Ummm…yeah, I do. Look at what Henry was doing, ninety years ago!

    http://www.chanvre-info.ch/info/en/article1864.html  Soy waste is still plentiful. Hemp can be grown virtually anywhere on the planet. This pisses off the cotton growers which is one of the big reasons why it’s illegal.
    If we could hog-tie the oil companies and let the farmers grow some of this stuff, and let loose the modern day chemists, billions in farm subsidies could be saved and the tax base would grow significantly. We could all then breathe a little easier.

    To me, plastic has always been synonymous with cheap. Putting in a Rolls Royce will never change that, and the extensive use of it in a car that is supposed to be a ‘planet saver’ will never make any sense to me.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    For all my criticism of the Volt, I do like its exterior looks very much.  It might be nice to get a used-up one someday and pimp it with a strong V6, akin to the Olds diesel retrofit program.

  • avatar
    Advo

    I’m not fond of that black strip below the side windows. Looks out of place somehow like it’s some attention-getting plastic thing tacked on instead of well-integrated design.

    Nowadays, autos and products have to look good in photographs or pics on the net because that’s where people first encounter it. All the pre-release speculation, first looks, reviews, blogs, forum comments, and whatever-else information is floating out there in cyberspace will perhaps influence one’s mind one way or the other before seeing it in person (or in a controlled-image advertisement or brochure, made to emphasize the best and minimize the worst).

    The Honda Crosstour is one vehicle that is said to look better in person yet is panned heavily based on only having seen photos alone.


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