By on August 23, 2010

Okay, everybody, take out your old Waitresses or Bouncing Souls songbooks, and sing along with me:

I know what girls like
I know what chicks want
I know what girls like
Girls like
…the Ford Edge.

Ford’s rolled 400,000 Edges out the door since the model was introduced five years ago. For reasons I cannot understand, it completely obliterated the Flex and the Freestyle/Taurus X at dealerships, outselling them combined by a factor of two or three in most months. Half of the Edges sold are registered to women, which likely means that far more than half of them were selected by, and are driven by, women. According to Ford, among buyers in this segment, “styling” ranks as the #5 reason to buy a vehicle, but Edge buyers rank “styling” as the number one reason they chose one.

So here’s the new one. Ford has made a solid effort to address the Edge’s shortcomings. It has more power, less weight (in some models), better brakes, and a much higher-quality interior. The dynamic package is significantly improved, and I had the chance to test that in a literally life-threatening situation, as we’ll see below. None of this will matter too much to the Coach-bag set, however. They’ll be blown-away by the new “myFord Touch” system… and if you care at all about the state of in-car electronics, you will be, too.

Welcome to the future. You’re looking at an analog speedometer (digital, of course, under the skin) and two full-color LCD screens that reconfigure on the fly, sometimes without your direct input, to provide information on everything from the name of that Larry Carlton track you’re hearing on SIRIUS “Watercolors” to the precise ratio of front/rear torque being delivered by the all-wheel-drive system under heavy cornering load.

The center screen is no less interesting. It’s almost endlessly customizable to meet your particular needs and it will overload you with data and gee-whiz graphics if you’re not careful. It was impossible to understand the full range of myFord Touch’s capabilities in a quickie press event, but here’s just one entirely factual scenario: You’re driving down a freeway. With the sweep of a finger, you’re visually browsing album covers to select tracks. On the left side of your speedometer is a full selection of instant fuel-economy data; on the right side, you’re browsing the contact directory on your phone. Your passenger is using the absolutely button-less center stack to “haptically” select temperature, and she’s also surfing the web on her laptop. Your rear-seat passengers are surfing as well, using the local WiFi network enabled by the Sprint WiFi USB “dongle” that’s plugged in next to your iPod. You touch the screen and are rewarded with a 3-D view of your destination city, including visually accurate depictions of individual buildings. You check and see that the weather looks good ahead and that your favorite movie is playing at 6:45pm. That gives you time to take a fast back road, so you take the next off-ramp and squeeze the downshift paddle behind the steering wheel… at which point the left-side display on your dashboard collapses and is replaced with a tachometer, shift-point indicator, and temperature gauge. You touch a control and the “dial” tach becomes a vertical-instrument tach, in the style of an WWII aircraft, and the space where the tach was is replaced by a torque-vectoring diagram. Time to hustle.

On the way to Ford’s “break stop”, I drove the FWD 3.5L Limited seen in the top photo. It’s noticeably faster and more tied-down than last year’s Edge, thanks to more power, bigger rear brakes, and a variety of minor friction and valving improvements in the front suspension. On the way back, I selected the 305-horse 3.7 Sport AWD. The extra 200cc of the Sport just about makes up for the extra weight of the AWD system and the “stunna” 22-inch forged wheels. Incidentally, this year’s Edge AWD is 40 pounds lighter than last year’s — good, if rare, news nowadays.

It’s raining with almost Biblical fury and although visibility is good, the amount of standing water on the road has slowed most traffic significantly. I’m hammering back to the hotel (readers of yesterday’s Accent review will understand why) with all available speed. Ahead of me, a long, empty dotted-yellow stretch of road… with an 18-wheeler doing 30mph up the hill. I pull into the left lane and accelerate to fifty or sixty. In many states, they won’t run a dotted-yellow past an intersection, but Tennessee does. I don’t think anything of it, since the intersection is empty, but then an old S-10 Blazer arrives at the crossroads and, without looking, simply whips directly into my path. The driver looks me right in the eye from fifty feet away and freezes like a deer, her foot full on the throttle, her cell phone falling from her left hand. There’s a gap between the S-10 and the semi-truck, with standing water shimmering menacingly. I relax my fingertips and steer lightly for the gap. With a “swoosh” I am past them both, the Edge placed less than an inch from my desired line. I look over at the passenger seat. My co-driver is reading his iPhone, completely undisturbed. “Did that woman just pull in front of us?” he inquires.

“As Felipe Massa would say… for sure.”

This is not to say that the Edge is perfect. It’s hard to understand why anybody would have chosen the previous Edge over the Flex, which offers more room, better steering, better ride, similar fuel economy, and a nicer interior for about the same money. I would continue to choose a Flex or — ssssshhhh! — a Taurus X over this Edge. If you’re shopping elsewhere, a Chevrolet Traverse also offers more room than the Edge for less money, and the Honda Crosstour is vastly cheaper with a very similar interior-packaging result. Toyota’s Venza also offers a less expensive alternative that’s bigger inside. It would also be remiss of us not to mention the fact that virtually everybody who chooses a vehicle of this type would be better-served by an actual family sedan.

Better-served, yes, but no family sedan has anything like the Edge’s panache, styling, solid feel, or super-tech interior. If you want to make a $40,000 statement of pure stylistic intent, this is your ride. The improvements in ride, handling, fuel economy (which is class-leading now and likely to be more so once the 2.0L Ecoboost arrives) and dashboard feel don’t really matter. When your neighbor sits in your 2011 Edge, hears you demand stock prices via voice control, and watches you “swish” album covers around on the main screen, how you do think she’s going to feel about her Honda Crosstour’s Commodore-64 nav screen and frumpy-ass 18″ alloys? I thought so. Ladies, your Edge is waiting.

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110 Comments on “Review: 2011 Ford Edge...”


  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    Baruth gets in touch with his softer side… who’da thunk it was possible? Nice review Jack. Thanks.

    With the edge being this good, why would anyone buy the Lincoln version? Jus’ sayin’…..

    • 0 avatar

      Good question. At least the Freestyle was recently canned and the Flex gives people a choice to opt for the same hardware in a Family Truckster package. That’s probably why women opt for the Edge — more carlike CUV styling that’s not too carlike (which is probably why the Freestyle flopped).

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    Nice write up Jack. I just recently got the chance to play with one of the 2011 models myself. The biggest improvement with the electronics is that you don’t actually have to use the buttons for almost any function anymore. Almost every radio/climate/navigation/phone feature is available by voice command, and you don’t have to go through multiple voice menus anymore – you just say what you want, and for the most part, the car does it. Here is a video showing how it works.

    As far as pricing goes, yes, if you go crazy with options, they get up there, but a 2011 Edge Limited FWD with Navigation is about $35,800. A Chevy Traverse 2LT FWD with navigation is $37,500, and a Honda Crosstour EX-L with navigation FWD is $35,500. Granted, the Chevy has an extra row of seats for the higher price, but that lines up with Flex and Explorer pricing, and I wouldn’t call the price difference with the Honda vast. The Edge also costs less than either, base model to base model.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      Michael, the Equinox is a lower competitor.
      That would be the Escape’s level.

    • 0 avatar
      Silvy_nonsense

      @ TrailerTrash

      Michael is just reporting data he’s pulled from the tool. The Equinox may not be an equivalent vehicle, but for whatever reasons consumers are frequently comparing it to the Flex.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      Silvy…

      Anybody that cross shops the Flex against the Equinox totally explodes all research and logic.

    • 0 avatar
      Z71_Silvy

      Michael, the Equinox is a lower competitor.
      That would be the Escape’s level.

      Not according to Ford…Ford officially compares it to the Equinox.

      My guess is because if they compare it to a lower class vehicle (it is more of an Escape competitor) it will make the lackluster 2011 Edge look better…it’s like the lipstick on a pig argument.

  • avatar
    musiccitymafia

    “For reasons I cannot understand, it completely obliterated the Flex and the Freestyle/Taurus X at dealerships, outselling them combined by a factor of two or three in most months. Half of the Edges sold are registered to women, which likely means that far more than half of them were selected by, and are driven by, women.”

    The Edge is hot. The other two, not so much. And is it really surprising that more women pick a car with an underpining derived from a Mazda than those derived from a Volvo. Still … $40k seems quite steep. Good for Ford. There was a lot of internal pressure to use only one underpinning (simplicity in plants, economies of scale, etc). Which do you think has the higher profit margin?

    • 0 avatar
      holydonut

      Ignoring fleet sales, I’m guessing net of incentives the Flex actually has a lower margin than the Edge when comparing similar vehicle classes. That is, the mix of AWD/FWD/engine will probably be a major factor for the average margin calc. But for similar powertrain types, I would not be shocked to see the Edge as a better vehicle in terms of profitability.

      Those Flexes just don’t move in bulk unless you make some extremely attractive offers to offset the negative value many buyers place on the styling.

      The general appearance of the Flex is just too much of a hurdle. Most women dislike the look of the vehicle, and the extra room, interior materials, handling, etc don’t make up for times when people simply think the car is ugly.

      Women may only buy half of the cars, but they’re influential in over 3/4 of car purchases once you start entering the realm of family-mobiles.

    • 0 avatar
      lawmonkey

      And to quote my grandmother, an avowed Z car and Jag enthusiast, when looking at a Flex: “That thing us UGLY.”

  • avatar
    ajla

    Welcome to the Future!!!
    _________________

    What happens when the Edge becomes self-aware?

  • avatar

    “And is it really surprising that more women pick a car with an underpining derived from a Mazda than those derived from a Volvo.”

    Vast majority of women wouldn’t know that, no offense. The Freestyle was simply too carlike in its looks to be taken seriously as a CUV. The Edge, on the other hand, hit the sweet spot.

    • 0 avatar
      Silvy_nonsense

      John, in fairness to women, most -people- probably don’t know what platform was used for the car they drive.

      I’d expect those of us who read this site to be aware of that kind of stuff but most people just don’t care.

  • avatar

    I drove one of these new back when they were released and was thoroughly unimpressed. This past week I had a chance to sit in a 2011 refreshed Edge as well as the new Explorer.

    I will make a prediction now, the Explorer is going to cannabalize the crap out of the Edge. Ford doesn’t need three crossovers, two of them are going to die. This review is written about one of them. The Flex is the other. Which isn’t a bad thing IMO.

    The Edge is about as worthless of a truck/SUV/AWD-thing there is on the market. It doesn’t surprise me at all that women are buying this thing and cite styling as the primary draw. It certainly doesn’t have anything else going for it.

    The Edge seats five in a pinch, the cargo area is scant and oddly shaped for real packing. It uses a lot of fuel and it’s really ugly. But hey, at least you can see over other cars on the road. That’s something I suppose. Pretty much all of the competition offers a better crossover for what people actually buy crossovers for. The refresh of the Edge didn’t address any of that, but with the Explorer I guess Ford already did.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      TriShield, you made a big point that I didn’t squeeze into my 800 words: The Explorer will also have this myFord Touch business and that will help it cannibalize the Edge.

      With that said, there’s going to be a big market for five-seat crossovers until the market gets sick of them. The Highlander hasn’t killed the RX350.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      Thinking back, I’d say the award for the first true style oriented crossover goes to Nissan for the Murano. Yes, there were some crossovers before that, but the Murano really took the styling direction completely away from SUVs and CUVs, and made it what it is today.

      The Edge follows the same formula of all the practicality of a sedan but with a higher seating position, more aggressive styling, and only marginally worse fuel economy. Toyota recently entered the field with the Venza, and Honda with the Crosstour, so there is a market there. Also look at vehicles that recently redesigned to be more like the Edge – the Kia Sorrento and the Cadillac SRX, and sales of both have skyrocketed. In the Kia’s case I guess the definite improvement in style and substance helped, but the SRX lost a row of seats, went to what a lot of people would consider an inferior FWD layout, and lost cargo space and utility, yet people can’t seem to get enough of them.

      Crossovers can’t all be lumped together into one segment anymore. You have distinct classes like small utilitarian vehicles (Escape, CR-V, Rav-4), mid-sized style driven sedan replacements (Edge, Venza, Crosstour, Equinox(maybe), Murano, Sorrento) and then the large SUV-replacements that depend more on utility (Highlander, Pilot, 2011 Explorer, Traverse). The differentiation may seem arbitrary, but it seems to exist in customer’s minds, and with that being said, the Edge is probably the best in that middle category.

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      Nullo, the CUV award goes to Toyota and Honda. They created the CUV segment with the Highlander and Pilot.

    • 0 avatar

      This differentiation is also aided by the cost boundaries. I bought my RAV4 in January 2006 when it was a hot product with no discounts and only wrote a check for $25,560. This is what saves Escape from being obliterated by Edge.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      JJ –
      The original Pilot and Highlander still had very SUV-like styling, I was bringing the Murano up as an example of the first real 5 seated crossover meant to be a sedan or car alternative as opposed to an SUV alternative. You could be right about Toyota paving the way though, the Lexus RX came out before the Murano and had the original swoopy styling.

    • 0 avatar

      I’m with NulloModo on this one. Both the Edge and the Venza are clearly inspired by the Murano.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      Um…what about the CX7?

      Seems to me, after reading all of these reviews today, this car seems slow.
      I agree that the Exploer with ecoboost or Edge next year with ecoboost are better choices.

      Still lean towards the CX7(turbo) in this middle area until the above are tested.

    • 0 avatar
      Silvy_nonsense

      TriShield, who cares that the Flex isn’t a great “truck/SUV/AWD-thing”? You’d have to be a fool to actually expect it to be. Since you’re not a fool, what’s your real agenda? Why do you even care? Why is that even important?

      Only an idiot would buy this vehicle expecting it to fjord streams, climb boulders and tackle hills so steep that the vehicle’s maximum approach angle actually matters. I’m pretty sure that oil exploration company and utility company fleet buyers, construction workers who need to bring a loaded pickup into and out of a muddy as he11 construction site, etc. are all aware that this vehicle won’t meet their very unusual, specialized needs.

      Some say that the Flex and new Explorer aren’t “real” 4×4′s. Turns out that outside the insular world of this and similar forums, the vast majority of the population just doesn’t care. This point is demonstrated by the 400,000 units sold to date and the fact that, since going on sale, the Flex has outsold every other mid-size crossover. Clearly being a “real” 4×4 (whatever that is) doesn’t matter in the marketplace. Good on Ford for figuring that out.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      Silvy

      While I applaud your intensity and in fact agree with your point, the Flex is not the car you are referring to but the above reviewed Edge.
      Perhaps that is why I was confused on your earlier entry above.

      I asked Michael Karesh to offer an explanainion soon of these modern AWD systems as I have become totally confused.
      Is the Swedish Halifax on the Ford as awesome as it is said to be?
      Is the MKS different from the newest Explorer???
      Is the Audi or Subaru AWD systems better?

      Front to rear or rear to front systems …WHICH actually perform as needed and how fast.

      I WISH somebody would address these and bring us up to date.

    • 0 avatar
      nrd515

      Ugly? That’s funny, when the Edge came out, it was one of the vehicles that made me think that Ford had finally exited it’s decades long styling nightmare. It’s not something I would buy, but IMHO it’s not bad looking at all.

  • avatar
    mrhappypants

    I’m not going to bother going to Ford’s website to see if it’s available with a stick. Why punish myself?

  • avatar
    tbp0701

    Maybe some people, particularly women, just like saying things like, “I’ll swing by to pick you up in the Edge,” rather than “the Flex,” “the Freestyle,” or “the Taurus.” One sounds kind of cool, maybe with shades of U2, while the others sound potentially painful, trying too hard to be trendy or a bit dated, respectively.

    I’ll be curmudgeonly and wonder about using a touchscreen interface in a vehicle, since it demands someone look at it rather than the road. Then again, dozens of buttons probably isn’t any less distracting.

  • avatar
    pariah

    What I don’t understand is why the Escape exists.

    • 0 avatar
      Truckducken

      This question was answered in a recent TTAC discussion by one of the best postings ever: “Women with dogs”.

    • 0 avatar
      faygo

      Escape is much cheaper, more truck-like, smaller and has way less technology in it than Edge/Explorer. it’s definitely got a place in the market, IIRC it’s been one of the sales leaders in the small SUV segment for basically ever.

      the chrome grilled Edge is a bit much, but it takes on a completely different look when blacked out. white with the blacked out grille has a strange stormtrooper look which is interesting.

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      The Escape exists because Toyota and Honda haters need something to buy.

  • avatar
    John R

    “For reasons I cannot understand, it completely obliterated the Flex and the Freestyle/Taurus X at dealerships, outselling them combined by a factor of two or three in most months.”

    I guess Ford needed an answer to the Infiniti FX and Acura MDX?

  • avatar
    dwford

    The Edge appeals to the sporty Murano intenders, The Explorer (which is much larger) will appeal to the Pilot/Highlander/Traverse crowd, while the Flex appeals to the urban early adopters. 2 of them are built off the same platform, so development costs are cheap. Th Escape is around because even after 10 years without a full redesign its the #1 compact crossover/suv.

    We have the same overlap at Hyundai. The AWD Tucson is only about $1000 cheaper than the larger, smoother riding Santa Fe, and we find buyers for both.

    Remember, buyers, don’t always make the rational choice – if so, most would be driving sedans.

  • avatar
    Kevin Kluttz

    The front end looks like a chrome (plated plastic) sea cow. Or maybe a giant walrus. Ugggly. Butt ugly. Where did Ford come up with the idea to imitate multi-blade razors, anyway?

    • 0 avatar
      Kevin Kluttz

      I am not allowed to edit my comment, so I’m replying to myself.

      And with all those nice distractions for the woman, girl, whatever drives these abominations, in addition to the squalling spoiled brats that will obviously be tagging along, I will be looking in my rear-view mirrors to see one of these coming at me at full speed at a stoplight or sign with the mommy unit looking down at her screen trying to figure out how to make it cooler in there because little pookie-pookie is too hot and screaming at the top of her lungs. That’s how I see the usefulness of a touch screen for a woman to use. They don’t even know how to check the air in a tire, much less navigate a street.

    • 0 avatar
      Amendment X

      +1. Doing this in a Porsche (where you know the target demographic will learn EVERY SINGLE ASPECT of the system because that’s how Porsche owners are) is one thing. Doing it in a mainstream kiddie carrier is a mistake – the last thing this target demographic needs is more distraction.

    • 0 avatar
      Silvy_nonsense

      Wow, comments consisting entirely of misogyny and stereotypes. Pitiful.

    • 0 avatar

      What’s more pitiful is the amount of truth in those comments. If you don’t believe me, watch the soccer mom crowd wrangle their SUVs through the mall parking lot.

      They don’t need any more distractions.

    • 0 avatar
      KINGRL

      @ silvy Aug 23- Yes they do sound like a group of misogynists. Do any of you have wives,girlfriends or daughters? If the Edge is not for you o.k., but WOW please respect the ladies.( or go on a date once in a while!!! with a female that is!!hahahahaha)

  • avatar
    BMWfan

    Just what we need. More technology to distract drivers. I guess all of the soccer mom’s out there will have to engage cruise control so they can use their last available appendage to surf the web while driving. It is great to see that we can develop better technology than our competitors, I just wish it was put to better use. Perhaps a better mass transit system, or a significant upgrade to the air transportation control system would be in order.

    • 0 avatar
      Silvy_nonsense

      Ford didn’t develop a better mass transit system or a better air transportation system because Ford isn’t owned by the government or an airline. I pretty sure that Ford sees mass transit and air travel as competitors to their core product, cars, and that explains why they spent their money developing a system that has helped them sell, wait for it… more cars.

    • 0 avatar

      I got a chance to ask Alan Mullaly to compare technology at Boeing to that at Ford. At Boeing, he headed the team that developed the first all digital flight deck, and he told me that their task at Boeing was to make the pilot’s job easier, to take a large amount of information and present it to the pilot in an easily assimilated form.

      Besides the gee-whiz factor of a lot of the infotainment, if done right it makes driving easier, more fun and safer.

      Frankly, if they can figure out the safety aspect of it, I can see Ford opening up a Ford App Store, just like Apple does with its phones and third parties would develop software applications that would run on Ford’s OS. Just as Apple checks those third party apps for compatibility issues, so would the Ford App Store. The problem is, if an App locks up your phone, it’s not someone’s life at stake, so you’d want to be really, really sure that those Apps won’t mess up the way the car runs. If it could be done it could open up a whole new world of car customization.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      While Ford is trying to increase the capability of the Sync system, I think the ultimate goal is to have Sync act as a gateway between the driver and whatever devices the driver might have, rather than an application platform on its own.

      The Sync Applink function for example give voice control and complete integration of the Pandora Internet Radio app through Sync. Check out the second video on this page for a demo . All in all, it’s slick, and you can see how doing it this way makes the whole process much safer allowing the driver to stay focused on the road. iPhone support may already be out, if not, it should be coming soon.

  • avatar
    B-Rad

    Bouncing Souls FTW!

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    Quick! Which one is the Ford Edge? I bet you can’t tell.

    A

    B

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    IMHO, the old front end was better looking. This Edge looks like it was done by the same stylist who did the RAM truck. How semi-like can a vehicle be and still meet all crash standards?

    • 0 avatar
      Disaster

      Agreed. Ford’s HUGE chrome grills look even worse than Acura’s. The MKX got a similar styling downgrade. Can’t wait for the big blocky grill era to be over.

    • 0 avatar
      supremebrougham

      You know Dan, I was thinking that same thing yesterday while walking through a Honda lot, and stumbled across a Crosstour. But my first thought was that if a Neanderthal could be a car, it would be the Crosstour. I mean look at that face, it’s downright scary! In the Edge’s defense though, after looking at one yesterday, I felt that at least Ford got the detailing down on it…the styling may be out there, but up close the materials looked good I thought.

  • avatar
    AnthonyG

    ‘You’re driving down a freeway. With the sweep of a finger, you’re visually browsing album covers to select tracks. On the left side of your speedometer is a full selection of instant fuel-economy data; on the right side, you’re browsing the contact directory on your phone. Your passenger is using the absolutely button-less center stack to “haptically” select temperature, and she’s also surfing the web on her laptop. Your rear-seat passengers are surfing as well, using the local WiFi network enabled by the Sprint WiFi USB “dongle” that’s plugged in next to your iPod. You touch the screen and are rewarded with a 3-D view of your destination city, including visually accurate depictions of individual buildings.
    You finally look in the direction of the road ahead and OH DAMN is that a stopped semi in front of us? watch out for that bus! BANG!

    • 0 avatar
      Silvy_nonsense

      I basically agree with you, but my feeling is that people who don’t pay attention while driving simply don’t pay attention while driving. MyTouch just gives those dopes something to focus on while brain dead. It’s not like they used to pay attention and no longer do because of MyTouch, those drivers were never paying attention in the first place.

      Eventually Ford will issue a press release saying “Insurance industry data shows drivers of MyTouch vehicles have fewer accidents” -or- the insurance industry will raise the rates on MyTouch equipped vehicles if data shows those drivers have more incidents. Time will tell.

  • avatar
    mjz

    Talk about distracted driving. Maybe this is TOO MUCH technology.

  • avatar
    jj99

    The Edge has a number of issues:

    1) It seems as Ford is throwing a bunch of electronic gizmos that are not needed and upgrading the interior on a vehicle that rides on a dated Mazda 6 chassis. That Mazda chassis might be from 12 years ago, but this estimate may be off by 1 or 2 years. Not even the Mazda 6 uses this chassis anymore. I think Ford is covering up an old design with lipstick. Not to mention Toyota engines put Ford engines to shame. It is possible Ford may not have the cash to bring this vehicle onto a newer chassis, so lipstick, lipstick, and more lipstick.

    2) The 07 and 08 Edge vehicles had quality problems and the used car guide by Consumer Reports does not recommend these vehicles. I suspect 09 and 10 Edge vehicles have not been around long enough to show their problems. Bottom line is a poor quality track record.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      Jj -
      The CD3 platform debuted 8 years ago with the 2003 MY Mazda6. Since then it has been enhanced, expanded, and reworked to underpin a number of vehicles. The version of the platform under the original Mazda6 isn’t the same one you see under the older Edge, which isn’t the same one under the new Mazda6 or new Edge, which isn’t the same one as under the CX-7 or CX-9. An underlying platform still leaves a fair bit of room for development and customization to fit the needs of a particular vehicle. Platforms themselves age gracefully if designed with flexibility in mind, and can easily remain practical and current through multiple generations of a vehicle.

      Compared to Toyotas V6, the Duratec 35 makes more power and returns better fuel economy. The design is entirely modern, with this engine family coming out only in 2007, and features modern technology like dual variable cam timing. The Duratec 35 is also ready for DI as can be seen in the EcoBoost variants, and will likely be DI standard when the next major redo of the Edge happens in a few years.

      Regarding reliability, there were some early teething issues regarding things like the rollup headliner fabric for the full roof sunroof and the weatherstripping between the rear spoiler and hatch glass. These have since been resolved. The only real mechanical issue had to do with early AWD units and a potential leak in the power takeoff unit. Again, this has since been resolved. All major mechanical, and electrical systems for the Edge have been bulletproof. CR seemed to have some issues with the brakes on eraly models, which some other reviews echoed. I never felt them lacking in normal driving, but the brakes have been upgraded in the 2011 models to appease the naysayers anyway.

    • 0 avatar

      The leaking PTU is the big one. Hopefully they’ve fully resolved it with the 2011. We have one report of this problem with a 2010, so even in the fourth model year it wasn’t entirely resolved. Very common with the 2007s and 2008s. With these years I advise people to go FWD.

      http://www.truedelta.com/car-reliability.php

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      I checked the Mazda 6 platform. This is what I found. That Mazda 6 platform was available in the US for model year 2003, which dates it to 2002. However, that same chassis was available outside the US for model year 2002 Mazda 6 and Mazda Atenza. This means consumers outside of the US were purchasing that chassis back in mid to late 2001. So we are looking at nearly a 10 year old chassis underlying the Edge. For reference, this chassis is the Mazda GG platform.
      It appears that Mazda 6 moved on to an upgraded chassis called GH around 2008 or 2009, and it appears Ford Edge skipped this upgrade, and stayed with the old GG chassis. Why is Ford skipping upgrades? As technology advances, it is almost certain the Mazda GH is better than GG. It is possible this Mazda 6 chassis upgrade is being skipped in order to conserve cash. Personally, I would rather have a newer chassis design than electronic wiz bang nick nacks.
      In the meantime, Pilot, Highlander, and Traverse are riding around on newer chassis designs.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      Jj –

      GY is what underpins the Mazda wagons, it isn’t used in any US market vehicles. GH is the Mazda name for CD3-2 , which is what underpins the 2011 Edge.

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      Nullo, you might be correct. The 2011 Edge might have been upgraded with a platform from 2008 Mazda 6, which is on par with the competition.

      TTAC should investigate this possible chassis upgrade. If true, it is a major advance for the Edge, and should be noted in the vehicle review. The 2010 and earlier Edge was riding on an old chassis design.

    • 0 avatar
      faygo

      I don’t understand the obsession with something or another being based on an “old” platform. worrying about that sort of thing is far too inside baseball for 99.99999% of the buying public and should be for even 99.999% of the informed enthusiast population.

      if the platform, regardless of it’s age, is able to deliver a segment-competitive product, the manufacturer would be foolish beyond belief to redesign it to a “new, improved” version just because. it’s what engineers would like to do (they like to design new shiny things) but using a proven platform and evolving it over time is far more efficient.

      no one complained about BMW maintaining large parts of the chassis on multiple generations of 3 series and 5/6 series. no one criticizes VW for using the Golf platform across a seemingly infinite variety of products (you can give them stick for all the seeming duplication and self-competition, but that’s got naught to do with the engineering/finance decision to use the common platform).

      even in cases where the platform itself was let age for far too long (about to be replaced Focus is a good example) it wasn’t the underlying chassis/powertrain performance of the Focus which gave everyone heartburn, it was the plain-vanilla wrapper on top of the platform and knowing that others got the better C1 platform long ago.

      at some point, the level of evolution in platform technology reaches a point of far diminishing returns and we get into an evolution stage which doesn’t require all-new platforms. super lightweighting and hybrid/BEV-specific applications being the exception of course, but as yet, those are not a significant enough part of the market to generate their own unique variants. even the Volt is Cruze-based, albeit with a unique floorpan to allow for the battery pack…

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      faygo, mechanical engineer knows that advances in computer technology and analysis software results in much better chassis designs. 10 years ago, the analysis an engineer could run on a chassis was very limited when compared to today. And, 10 years from now, breakthroughs in analysis software coupled with even faster computers will make today’s chassis seem stone age. It is an arms race in engineering, and I would never purchase a vehicle with a dated chassis design.

      As I said, if the 2011 Edge has the updated 2008 Mazda 6 chassis, this is a major improvement, and it closes a huge gap with Toyota and Honda. I hope Ford is working on the next Edge chassis, because the Japanese likely are. I hope Ford is smart enough to make this fact known so Consumer Reports updates their statements.

      TTAC … Does the 2011 Edge have the new 2008 Mazda 6 chassis?

    • 0 avatar
      Educator(of teachers)Dan

      @faygo Continuing to use old platforms either demonstrates lack of money (Chrysler for many years) or lack of imagination (GM & Ford mostly) but your right, it’s kind of a peeing contest arguing about platforms. I depends on what you do with what your given. And can you make the various vehicles built on the platform “feel” different.

      The Impala is pretty good (well at least the LT and LTZ models) given the age of the w-body. The Chrysler Fifth Avenue discussed in the CC is pretty good given it’s origins and long life.

    • 0 avatar
      Silvy_nonsense

      jj99, you are not reporting Consumer Reports data correctly.

      The ’07, ’08 & ’09 front wheel drive and the ’09 4WD edge are all rated at “Above Average Reliability” overall by Consumer Reports. (There is no CR data available yet for 2010 models.)

      Only the AWD ’07 & ’08 Edge are rated at “Below Average Reliablity” overall due to the frequency of minor transmission, brake and drive system problems. The other fourteen tracked categories were rated as average, better than average or significantly better than average.

  • avatar
    Jseis

    My wife loves the Edge but as it’ll never tow my boat, no dice. She loves the Flex as well but it’ll barely tow my boat (I like it as well). Then we stopped by the dealer and saw and test drove an Adrenalin (Black 2010 and last model year). While it won’t tow like my Expedition, she really likes it (something to do with the same engine as our GT)…What Ford is on to is “practicality with styling/performance” and women like buying cars. I don’t need a full size truck anymore. Kids are out of college. We’re downsizing somewhat…to many choices.

  • avatar
    stationwagon

    I would rather have a Ford Taurus, to me this is nothing more than a lifted and bloated, Ford Taurus.

  • avatar

    The exterior of this car looks ridiculous. I’m hating the new grill.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Practical Dave M. love(d) the Taurus X and is vexed why it failed. Dave M.’s wife bought a loaded Edge and loves it. I personally don’t like it’s width and low-capacity cargo area. Nor the way it drives – too heavy for me.

    But yeah, Ford got a wheelbarrow of cash from us….

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    That console is an ergonomic disaster.

    I like touch screens and generally have no trouble with “plastic” UIs on consumer devices, but in an automobile you want static, tactile controls that you can operate without looking at them.

    Take the iPod or iPhone, for example. It works really well when you’re standing, sitting or possibly walking because you can work with it’s (very visual) interface easily. When your eyes are off it’s screen, it’s nearly impossible. Compare that to, say, the Fisher Price console of many cars with good ergonomics: big, distinct and admittedly tacky buttons you can use without looking at them.

    I’m surprised Ford is making this mistake because previous iterations of Sync (and the IP in the Fusion Hybrid) were good steps away from having to look at the infotainment or telematics system, and thusly safer**. This is big, fat step backwards.

    ** Ford has, admittedly, made the same mistake Honda has in it’s more premium cars, and that GM makes in everything: lots and lots of elegant looking but visually-indistinct buttons. Toyota, despite making some of the tackiest consoles on existence, does this right.

    • 0 avatar
      Silvy_nonsense

      Your argument is seriously undercut by the fact that MyTouch has a very effective voice recognition system. For those buttons that need to be used with any frequency, the controls are on the steering wheel and can be triggered by your thumb. It doesn’t matter what happens on the dash because you rarely have to use the controls located on it and you really shouldn’t be reaching for the dash at all.

      Frankly, dash or console buttons of any kind are a massive step backwards when steering wheel mounted controls and effective voice recognition systems are available.

      I wonder if Ford plans to extend MyTouch to other switched controls like the window, lock, sunroof and mirror actuators?

    • 0 avatar
      PeriSoft

      The problem I have with voice recognition:

      a) I feel like an idiot. If I’m going to have voice recognition, I want to start commands with “Computer -” and have Majel Barett reply. Anything else is unacceptable.

      b) I don’t want to have to turn down A State Of Trance to raise the temperature. I know voice recognition has improved, but I doubt it can recognize my command over 97db of Dutch club music.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Frankly, dash or console buttons of any kind are a massive step backwards when steering wheel mounted controls and effective voice recognition systems are available.

      I would say yes, except that there are no effective voice recognition systems available, and many manufacturers have gone mad vis a vis steering-wheel audio controls. Acura, for example, often equips a wheel with so many buttons that you’re forced to study the damn thing for quite some time.

      We already know what good ergonomics are; why many designers (and not just in automobilia) choose to ignore them or attempt to supplant them with inadequate substitutes is puzzling and irritating.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      Peri –

      Well, you can’t just say computer, and I don’t think has the rights to Majel Barett’s voice yet, but there is always hope. All you have to do is hit the voice button on the steering wheel and say the command after the beep. The system automatically dims your music for a moment to give you time to give the command.

      Psar –

      I can see a lot of buttons potentially being a problem for someone who drives a lot of different cars often, but aside from car salesmen, road warriors, and automotive journalists, there aren’t many people who have more than two or three cars in their daily lives. I really liked the previous Ford steering wheel with the two stacks of thumb buttons, but this new one is supposedly going to be easier once someone is familiar with it.

      Your comment about no effective voice recognition systems being available is off though – Sync is already very good, especially if you take a bit of time to learn the little tricks, but the 2011 version is heads and tails above even previous versions of Sync. Old sync accepted about 1,500 commands, new MyFord Touch Sync accepts about 15,000, and you don’t have to go through multiple menus to get to them. There is a voice training mode to let the car learn your voice, but it almost always gets it right the first time.

  • avatar
    jj99

    I checked the Mazda 6 platform. This is what I found. That Mazda 6 platform was available in the US for model year 2003, which dates it to 2002. However, that same chassis was available outside the US for model year 2002 Mazda 6 and Mazda Atenza. This means consumers outside of the US were purchasing that chassis back in mid to late 2001. So we are looking at nearly a 10 year old chassis underlying the Edge. For reference, this chassis is the Mazda GG platform.

    It appears that Mazda 6 moved on to an upgraded chassis called GY around 2008 or 2009, and it appears Ford Edge skipped this upgrade, and stayed with the old GG chassis. Why is Ford skipping upgrades? As technology advances, it is almost certain the Mazda GY is better than GG. It is possible this Mazda 6 chassis upgrade is being skipped in order to conserve cash. In the meantime, Pilot and Highlander are riding around on newer chassis designs.

  • avatar
    lawmonkey

    I’m very curious about the gadgets and gizmos, moreso than in the rest of the vehicle. I think the knowledge that they will be deployed in other Ford products damages the allure of the new Edge considerably, however it is bound to get a good initial boost from them.

    One thing I am worried about – tech can become second nature, unless it has context sensitive controls. My 2007 VW GTI had this – the steering wheel buttons would do different things depending on what mode the radio/menu was in. Meaning, if you pressed down, in might not change the radio station but just move a cursor down on a menu. Having to take your eyes off the road to see your current context is bad, as it not only involves a glance but a mental calculation that takes your primary focus off of calculating how close you are to hitting someone. We’ll see how this is handled in the Ford system. I’m not particularly optimistic, and think that the system will grow like the BMW system into bringing BACK some of the dedicated buttons.

    • 0 avatar
      Silvy_nonsense

      When Ford surveyed buyers, MyTouch was a top reason that buyers chose a Ford over a competitor’s product. MyTouch is selling cars and Ford wants it deployed ubiquitously throughout the Ford and Lincoln lineups. MyTouch is already available in a number of Ford products and has been for some time, so there has never been much, if any, allure to the gizmos in the Edge over other Fords.

      As far as the controls go, remember that the MyTouch system can control most functions by voice command. You hit the steering wheel button to alert the system that you are about to give a command, then you speak the command. You don’t need to use the button to scroll through the menu, change the song, adjust the volume, etc. You can do all that and more by just saying it. The system recognizes many phrases for one action, so you don’t have to memorize a list of commands. “Radio on.”, “Stereo on.”, “Turn on the radio.” will all do the same thing.

  • avatar
    portico

    I own a 09 Escape. The Escape already has plenty of technology on it. I suspect that whatever new gadgets FOrd comes up with they will eventually find their way on the Escape. I live in Northern Va and see very few Edges on the road. I see a ton of Escapes all over the place. I am afraid to say this, but its almost as if the Escape has become a trendy pick among the upper middle class in this area. It’s like Ford is the new cool brand to be associated with. This never would have happened even 6 years ago. Ford has really rebranded itself in this area and the Escape benefits from it. I was at my local Ford dealer the other day and the salesperson was telling me that the Escape and F150 sell better than anything else.
    Who would have guessed that this would have happened in such an affluent area.

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      portico, I see exactly the same on the east and west coast. Almost no Edges, but Escapes everywhere. In fact, I see as many Escapes as I see Rav4 and CRV.

    • 0 avatar
      Silvy_nonsense

      The Escape is four thousand dollars cheaper and has been on sale for nine years vs. the Edge’s three, so one would expect to see more…

      Sales of the Escape are down ~30% over the same period last year, whereas Edge sales are up 33%, fwiw.

  • avatar
    carguy

    That new front end does not look like good news for pedestrians. Nor does it bode well for front visibility. I guess soft-roaders need some macho visuals to set them apart from mini vans and station wagons.

  • avatar
    csf

    My wife drives a 2008 Mazda CX-9 (not CX-7) which we are very pleased with. Last year it was rear-ended and in the body shop for 28 days. They gave us an Edge as a rental.

    Understanding the Ford was a rental vehicle, but still only had 8,000 miles on it, I can say without hesitation that everything in the Mazda was more refined – engine, transmission, handling, braking, interior materials, comfort, controls, etc, etc. I must say I was disappointed – I wanted the Edge to be great, and while it was not bad it was not outstanding either.

    I’m glad to see the upgrades Ford has made . . . . perhaps it will ride like a Mazda now.

    • 0 avatar
      RandomDudeUSA

      I agree the cx9 seems to make the most direct comparison to the edge. We are very happy with our 2009 and the 3rd seat is a plus as is the cargo room (w/3rd seat down). I figure why buy a mid/full size crossover that can only carry 5 passengers, I can get a wagon or sedan that can do that & get better mpg.
      Mazda is often overlooked but I think they have a pretty nice lineup and can be had for less than comparable brands…try to find another 7 pass, awd, leather, 270hp, moonroof, Bose for under 29k

      and to the guy that says the edge will not tow his boat but a flex will…WTF kind of boat is that? And this will not tow like your expedition nor will it get mileage like a focus, nor will it float like a boat..-insert obvious statement here-

  • avatar
    TimCrothers

    The Mazda CX-9 you drive is actually a Ford CD3 car and was designed almost entirely by Ford engineers. The Ford Edge is the opposite and is mostly Mazda. So The Mazda driving experience you love so much is really a Ford and the Ford you dislike is really the Mazda. The Mazda3 (Ford Focus) and Mazda5 (Ford Grand C-Max) are the same way almost entirely Ford designed cars.

    • 0 avatar
      PartsUnknown

      You’re a little off here. The CX-9 3.7 liter V6 shares engine technology with Ford’s Duratec series, but the transmission (Aisin) is different, and the exterior, interior, steering and suspension are Mazda-engineered. The Edge and CX-7 share a platform, but the Edge has a Duratec V6 while the CX-7 has a Mazda-designed turbo 4. And again, each company did it’s own interior and exterior design, as well as suspension development. Same story with the Mazda3 and Focus. The Focus is still on the old platform while the Mazda3 is an all-new design. The Mazda5 has been around since 2005 and has nothing at all in common with the recently introduced C-Max.

      The beneficial Ford/Mazda partnership has led to sharing of technology (particularly engines) and basic platforms, but each company does their own design and engineering. Saying that Mazdas are “almost entirely” designed by Ford is patently false, as is the assertion that a Ford is “really a Mazda.” Far too simplistic – like me saying that my Taurus X is “really a Volvo.” Not true.

    • 0 avatar
      csf

      I thought the CD-3 platform, on which both the CX-9 and Edge are both built, was designed BY MAZDA for Ford, and used in many other vehicles as well.

      I do not dislike Fords – I requested the Edge as a rental because I assumed it would ride and handle like the CX-9. It did not. For example, the Aisin built 6 speed transmission in our Mazda was far smoother than the Edge.

      We bought the CX-9 as we needed the third row of seats. Of course the Edge does not provide that option. The Edge was not bad, but based on our rental I would have not bought it. Hopefully the new upgrades have improved it.

      Obviously, different modifications to the same basic platform result in substantially different vehicles.

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    It’s only a misogynistic stereotype if it isn’t true.

    This one is true.

  • avatar
    jj99

    Ouch. MotorTrend.com has a road test of the 11 Edge, and the claim is the brakes are a “fatal flaw”. This could be a deal killer.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      To be fair, the first 60-0 stop was fine, but subsequent ones stretched out as much as 30 feet beyond the competition.

      How often will the buyers for this car panic-stop it three times over the course of a couple minutes?

    • 0 avatar
      Z71_Silvy

      Ouch. MotorTrend.com has a road test of the 11 Edge, and the claim is the brakes are a “fatal flaw”. This could be a deal killer.

      It certainly should be a deal killer…..Ford has a very well documented history of going cheap on brakes.

      Look at the pitiful brakes on the Taurus SHOW.

      What if your tires only worked properly the FIRST time you tried to do something? What if your heater only worked the first time? How about the AC? Fuel pump? Steering wheel? Turn signals? Windshield wipers? Defrosters? Etc?

  • avatar
    portico

    Silvy, I am talking about 08-10 model years. I see very few Escapes before these years.

  • avatar
    Z71_Silvy

    While this so-called “new” Edge represents a rather pitiful MCE (horrid exterior, bland interior with questionable materials), the bigger question is why? Why does the Edge still exist?

    Sure, Ford will chest thump about how it’s sold 400K units since launch……like that is some sort of magical milestone (rather than the arbitrary number that it is)…but it’s sales were down over 20% last year. And there is MAJOR overlap in terms of price with the Flex and Flex II (<– Explorer) and there is a size overlap with Ford's OTHER 5-seat, 3500 pound towing capacity SUV…the Escape.

    Ford's SUV line-up is so cluttered and full of overlap, the appliances will cannibalize each other in sales. Escape, Edge, Explorer, Flex, Expedition…it's crazy.

    It's more and more clear every day that Ford is quickly turning into the old GM…….

    • 0 avatar
      Loser

      It’s more and more clear every day that Ford is quickly turning into the old GM…….

      And undeniably clear to even the most extreme GM sycophant… the “New GM” is still the old GM.

      http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/gm-our-internal-controls-over-financial-reporting-currently-not-effective/

    • 0 avatar
      TimCrothers

      I know, 5 different Ford SUV/CUV’s is crazy just look at Toyota they only have 7………Oh. And Nissan only has 6…… oh. At least Chevy only has 5 just like Ford. Good thing GM doesn’t make Buick’s and GMC anymore or they would have 9 non luxury SUV/CUV.

    • 0 avatar
      AnthonyG

      Only if you hate Ford!

      As loser says, only GM can be GM, old or new!

    • 0 avatar
      Z71_Silvy

      Loser…
      The new GM is clearly not the old GM as the new GM just posted a profit…something the old GM hadn’t done in years.
      ——————
      Tim…
      First…get your facts straight….Chevy has 4 suvs….and did you just compare all of GM to the Ford brand? If you take all of the Ford appliance suvs on sale today…you would have 10….Escape, Edge, Explorer, Expedition, Flex, Mariner, Mountaineer, Lincoln Edge, Lincoln Flex, and Lincoln Expedition.

      But I like how you justify what ford is doing by saying, “but Toyota does it…..”. Not a very strong argument….

    • 0 avatar
      TimCrothers

      No Chevy has 5 crossovers/SUVs, the HHR, Equinox, Traverse, Tahoe and Suburban. And yes the HHR is a crossover because GM explicitly calls it one. http://www.chevrolet.com/vehicles/2011/hhr/overview.do Title: 2011 Chevy HHR & HHR SS TurboCharged | Crossover Vehicle | Chevrolet.

      Ford/Lincoln only makes 8 total, the Escape, Edge, Explorer, Flex, Expedition, Lincoln MKX (Edge), Lincoln MKT (Flex) and Lincoln Navigator (Explorer). Mercury is as DEAD as Pontiac or Saturn. GM is way crazier with 12 the HHR, Equinox, Traverse, Tahoe, Suburban, Enclave, Acadia, Terrain, Yukon, Yukon XL, SRX and Escalade. Even Toyota/Scion/Lexus’s 11 isn’t that crazy, xB, Venza, Rav4, FJ Cruiser, Highlander, 4Runner, Sequoia, Land Cruiser, RX, GX, LX.

      And Silvy you still haven’t explained how the Ford SUV/CUV’s overlap.
      Ford Escape Compact/5 pass
      Ford Edge Midsize/5 pass
      Ford Flex Large/7 pass
      Ford Explorer Off-Road Towing Midsize/7 pass
      Ford Expedition Heavy Duty Towing/8 pass

      Obviously the Chevy Traverse and Tahoe are redundant because both are Large AWD 8 passenger SUVs, wouldn’t you agree?

    • 0 avatar
      Z71_Silvy

      Timmy,

      The HHR is not a SUV/CUV. What a stretch that was. According to the site YOU LINKed…under ‘SUVs/CROSSOVERS’…it lists 4.

      And Mercury is not dead just yet AS THEY ARE STILL MAKING THEM.

      Try again.

    • 0 avatar
      Loser

      Silvy..TRY AGAIN,

      You said “The new GM is clearly not the old GM as the new GM just posted a profit…something the old GM hadn’t done in years”.

      Ford has been making a profit longer than GM. Using your above logic would make Ford better than GM and your claim about Ford quickly turning into the old GM hypocritical.

      After welching on it’s obligations there’s no excuse for GM not to make a profit…but as you know but chose to ignore, GM questions it’s own profit facts.

      From GM itself…

      “We have determined that our disclosure controls and procedures and our internal control over financial reporting are currently not effective. The lack of effective internal controls could materially adversely affect our financial condition and ability to carry out our business plan.”

      “Until we have been able to test the operating effectiveness of remediated internal controls and ensure the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures, any material weaknesses may materially adversely affect our ability to report accurately our financial condition and results of operations in the future in a timely and reliable manner. In addition, although we continually review and evaluate internal control systems to allow management to report on the sufficiency of our internal controls, we cannot assure you that we will not discover additional weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting.”

      Sounds like the old GM to me.

    • 0 avatar
      TimCrothers

      http://www.gmfleet.com/suvscrossovers/
      What’s the first entry on the list? HHR. Point Set Match. Hell, I under counted GM’s SUV/CUV count because it also includes the CTS Sport Wagon. So GM has 13 models.

      Also, you can’t order any Mercury anymore. What’s on the lots and car transports is it. No more orders fleet or consumer whatsoever allowed. But if you count unsold cars on the lot as “alive” then Saturn and Pontiac are still alive too.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    No doubt due to 330 pounds of extra flab, Motor Trend clocked the Edge Sport at 7.6 seconds to 60 vs. 7.1 seconds for the 25-hp weaker but much lighter base Edge lacking AWD.

    I don’t know if they tested an green or anemic Sport model vs. a broken-in/ringer base model, but a half-second difference?

    Also, I’m sure having to lug an extra offensive tackle’s worth of weight around can’t help the driving dynamics.

    This is why automakers shouldn’t throw the “Sport” moniker around so freely.

  • avatar
    Macca

    Nice review and great Commodore 64 reference! It is kind of interesting how car tech lags so far behind – like the introduction of USB ports into automotive sound systems. Forget your various DAPs; just give me a 64GB thumb drive (nice compare/contrast with the 64KB RAM in the C64…) with folder searching capability on the head unit. I’m kind of going on a tangential rant here, but however overwhelming and distracting it may be, it’s nice to see a vehicle with some modern tech beyond the ubiquitous ‘nav’ unit.

  • avatar
    ciddyguy

    Personally, I’m not in love with that front end, it looks to dominate the car’s overall looks and thus appears out of proportions, but then again, it may well be the camera angle emphasizing something that isn’t there.

    That said, I think the car has TOO many gadgets and gizmos for its own good – and for the driver too, voice recognition or no, especially since so many are distracted by just their cell phone, let alone anything else while driving.

    I have not had the need to buy a sat-nav yet and if I need instructions, there is the internet, Google maps (or mapquest) and while neither are the most accurate, it can get me in the right ballpark, just do it before I head out whenever possible.

  • avatar
    Loser

    Ford needs to lay off the over-chromed grills. They look like crap IMHO.

  • avatar
    nathan thurber

    As a owner of a 2007 Edge i see alot of welcome changes..  I really enjoy the vechile but i do have some problems with braking but otherwise a pretty solid vechicle.

  • avatar
    slumba

    I (a guy) love the Flex; my wife hates it, thinks it is too low to the ground.  She wants an SUV, if we could afford it a Tahoe or similar.  Right now we are maybe going to compromise on the Edge, not sure yet.  The Highlander is under consideration but have reservations about Toyota.


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