By on August 11, 2010

Nothing but bad news from the video recorder; even when it was working, the fabulous sound of the supercharged CTS-V’s V-8 was left out.

This is a reasonably quick pit-to-pit lap of Monticello in the CTS-V Coupe. I was 3mph short of the local instructors at the end of the back straight. I’ll blame it on (the admirably fit) weight of my passenger, AutoGuide’s senior editor Colum Wood.

In the video, you can see the site of my off-track mishap and get a feel for what it’s like to push this very quick coupe around the track at cornering pressures of 1.1g or more. Don’t forget to click it to “480″ to get the full resolution from the instruments.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

18 Comments on “Return With Us Now To The Days Of Silent (Track) Film...”


  • avatar
    Jack Baruth

    For those of you who care… We were on the track for 2:42, starting at 20mph from the pit entrance. I would say this corresponds roughly to a 2:44 lap.

    So… why so much faster than CTS-V Challenge, where I ran a 2:51? A few reasons. The track was dry, whereas it was wet for my run session of the event. Also, we didn’t have to deal with the chicane in back that was placed there for the Challenge.

  • avatar

    I can hear it in my head. It sounds… wuchtig.

  • avatar
    twotone

    Nice driving!

    I though the steering wheel was supposed to be in opposite lock going through those tight corners? Looks like your passenger had a hard time staying awake.

    Twotone

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I think you’ve been watching too much Top Gear! wink wink.

      Ross Bentley tells us that the driver who turns the steering wheel the absolute least amount possible will be fastest. I subscribe to that wholeheartedly and I work very hard at never turning the steering wheel any more than I have to. Doesn’t mean I always succeed.

      If you are opposite-locking, you’re wasting time. There are very rare exceptions, such as certain corners in SCCA National Solo where the radius is so short that the car won’t naturally turn without binding excessively.

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    Wow, you make it look easy Jack.

    It’s probably the lack of sound and lack of much on the sidelines on the course, but you don’t really get a sense of speed from the video. Had the speedometer graphic not been there I wouldn’t have guessed that car broke 60mph the entire run from just the video.

  • avatar
    Stingray

    I saw his hands movement. As he recommends.

    Also reminded me from one Senna on a NSX video I saw some days ago. It was interesting to see how he applied power.

    Nice video, pity it doesn’t have sound.

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    Dude! Yer sittin’ way too close to the wheel! *looks around, leans back, and waits*

    Aside from that,
    1) My (GT1 racing) dad is right: Street cars on race tracks look slow, even if they’re really fast.

    2) I could swear my 9-5 is as fast or faster from 60 to 100. It doesn’t really make sense given the numbers, but I’ll routinely hit 95 while passing cars going 55, and I’m not dawdling around in the other lane for 9 seconds. Is there something I’m not seeing here, like uphill straights, or something?

    I know that 9-5s are supposed to punch above their weight in 60-to-N acceleration, but it doesn’t seem like a 550hp car should look anywhere near as slow as I know my car really is!

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      You strike me as the kind of fellow who owns at least one chronograph :) Time yourself on the roll from 60 to 100 and then come back to the video… There is a lot of elevation change on the track, and as usual the video doesn’t show it well, but the CTS-V is remarkably rapid from sixty to “the ton”.

      With that said, the relatively short rev limit on the V (about 6500 if I recall correctly) and the size of the supercharger mean you don’t get much of a high-rpm rush. The car almost feels like an electric car, it’s very torquey and just crawls up the tach from 5000 up.

    • 0 avatar
      PeriSoft

      Yes and no; I’ll shoot video and then use the timecode to figure stuff out… good to 1/30th or so if I shoot 60p. :)

      There’s a reason I qualified my statement rather than going, “HA HA my Saab is faster!”…

      I did pass a couple of cars today and kept an eye on the needle as I went by; visually it seemed similar. I can’t bring myself to do a 60-to-100 run with a camera on the speedo without SOME excuse for going that fast, though. I have a feeling that the law would take a dim view if they pulled me for 100 in a 55 and saw a camera mounted by the driver’s seat…

      I suspect that you’re right and there’s a perception gap. The needle probably looks like it’s moving a lot faster when you’re in the left hand lane going by a semi, rather than sitting at your desk watching a video!

  • avatar
    Alexdi

    I was making gearchange sounds in my head the whole video. Of particular note was the G-meter. I’ve always thought the fastest driver was the one who could quickly and smoothly peg the car’s G-limit approaching and going through every turn that would benefit from it. By that metric, you must have been blazing.

  • avatar
    Morea

    I dunno Jack, the part of the tape where you “Ooops”, it seems as if your arms are virtually crossed over each other. Thus, you are not pulling down on the wheel to turn it with the same muscles you would if the wheel were straight. So it brings up eternal question: When does one take one’s hands off the wheel in a sharp turn? (I would have repositioned my hands, but I’m no Tazio Nuvolari either!)

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Even though you aren’t using the same muscles (very sharp observation btw) your hands still have the same kinesthetic memory. So you’re okay and your mind doesn’t need the visual cue of the wheel’s location (think yellow stripe on a GT3 wheel) to know your place.

      If you have to crank the wheel so far your elbow junction gets in the way, leave your left hand in its place and shuffle your right, then index to return with your left hand and replace your right hand where it should be afterwards.

    • 0 avatar
      Morea

      If you have to crank the wheel so far your elbow junction gets in the way, leave your left hand in its place and shuffle your right, then index to return with your left hand and replace your right hand where it should be afterwards.

      This is generally what I do for tight corners. Once I have completed a session or two on a new track I can learn where to preposition one hand for a tight turn. However, if the sharp turn is part of a sequence of turns, this prepositioning (or returning prepositioned hands to their normal position) can upset the balance of the car if not done adeptly. (I am working on my adeptness, but dammit I need more seat time!)

      Of course the solution is a quicker steering rack, but in a car w/o power steering it makes parking lot maneuvers a little annoying.

      BTW, love your posts (just lay off any political references so discussions don’t devolve into pointless political name calling.)

  • avatar
    NN

    So Jack, are you going to give it the ultimate endorsement and buy one? At least the wagon version?

  • avatar
    Jack Baruth

    More bench racing…

    Not all CTS-Vs are created equal. Comparing my lap of Monticello’s with John Heinricy’s. Before the long straight, my lowest midcorner speed is 47mph and my speed at corner exit is 63. John’s lowest midcorner is 45 and his exit is 64. At the final “chiclet” of the kink I am doing 134, he is doing 142. Hmm. Assuming I outweigh John by maybe 40 pounds, and Colum weighs 170 or so…

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      GM’s tweaked V8s have often shown slightly different power levels. The LT4 especially.

      How did your straight speeds differ?

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      That long straight is the closest thing Monticello has to a dyno, which is why I chose those numbers… as long as you exit the corner at about the same speed and pointed in the same direction, you should reach the kink at the same speed.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Heinricy probably just got a stouter engine then.

      Like I wrote earlier, I’ve seen that LT4s and LS6s can have some power differences from car to car. I wouldn’t be surprised if the LSA, LS7, and LS9 were the same way.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States