By on August 20, 2010

The core hypocrisy of the UAW is that it claims to work on behalf of workers everywhere, while actually serving only the interests of its most senior members. And the cognitive dissonance produced by this grotesque contradiction can lead to some interesting challenges in the day-to-day life of the union, particularly in the design of parking lot signs designed to keep the competition out. The sign shown above and the sign shown in the post preceding this one show the UAW at its most honest: if it’s built by one of the Detroit Three, it’s OK. If it’s got a “foreign nameplate” it’s not. But this honesty also betrays the fact that the UAW simply wants everyone to support it’s employers, rather than lead a nationalistic or class-based crusade.

At most locals the signs are more simple and ideal-oriented, but they’re also completely misleading. For example, a Japanese-built Camry or Korean-built Elantra should be OK in a lot with a “Union Made Vehicle Parking Only” sign, and an American-built Camry or Sonata should be fine in a lot with a “No Foreign Cars Allowed” sign… but of course, neither scenario would be tolerated. While you’re pondering the deeply cynical self-delusion at play here, enjoy this hastily-assembled gallery of union parking lot signs.

Update: Picture 417 has been removed at the request of the photographer. The original photo can be viewed here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mlavander/4034221120/#/

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95 Comments on “Bonus Gallery: “No Foreign Car Parking” Signs...”


  • avatar
    Jeff Semenak

    Indeed, a law-suit against the union for towing would be educational.

    • 0 avatar
      aspade

      It’s private property. They can tow any car they’d like.

    • 0 avatar
      1996MEdition

      I could also boycott the UAW and refuse to do any kind of business with them for maintaining policies like this. Oh yeah….I already do that.

    • 0 avatar
      nonce

      I’d like to hear from an actual lawyer about “you can tow whatever you like” from your parking lot. If you let people into your lot with signage suggesting they can park there, I suspect that the situation is not as clear-cut and some people think.

    • 0 avatar
      Patrickj

      Given the large number of signs in the next post, it would look to have more to do with getting a cut of the tow revenue than anything else.

      Towing scams are rampant in DC area parking lots and this looks to be a scam rather than some principled stand.

  • avatar
    superbadd75

    Is that not a Hyundai I spy in the parking lot behind the steelworkers sign (pic #4)?

  • avatar
    krazykarguy

    There’s a Mazda 6 parked in the Ford lot picture. Gray area, I know…

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      The Mazda6 (along with the NUMMI Corollas, before the plant’s closure) are my favourite cognitive dissonance generators. American-assembled, union-made cars screwed together at a domestic factory by UAW members.

      Not all union people are like this, though. Many are, but I know more than a few CAW rank-and-file who would rather drive a Corolla or Civic because they value the first digit in the VIN more than the second and third.

  • avatar
    findude

    Some of the examples make sense in a UAW-sort of way, but the sign that uses the phrase “foreign nameplates” misses the point entirely.

    Part of the reason I bought a Honda Accord instead of a Ford Fusion is because I wanted to buy a car made in the USA.

  • avatar
    dadude53

    Is that a crossed out VW bug on the GM Janesville sign? If so, that reminds me of the “No VW`s allowed” parking signs at GM plants in the Detroit area of the `60s.

    • 0 avatar
      hakata

      It’s like a combination of a Tatra and 2CV. I’m thinking Citroen, since the only thing a red-blooded American hates more than a Jap car would be a froggy little French car.

  • avatar
    1996MEdition

    Shows the hypocrisy since a lot of GM, Ford & Chrysler vehicles are assembled outside the US (HHR, Fusion, LaCrosse, Journey, etc). Last time I checked, Canada is a foriegn country if you live in the US.

    This also reflects the idiocy of management that knows nothing about the competition. Executives should be required to drive the competition so they know what they are up against. The same could be said for managers, engineers, and line workers as well.

    • 0 avatar

      Same thing for us Canadians. The “Big Three” are known as domestics here, too, but I’m not sure what the argument in favour of that is. A Canadian-made Toyota seems a lot more Canadian to me than a US-built Chevrolet.

      I often ask people which is a more “domestic” vehicle, a Honda built in Ohio or a Chevrolet built in South Korea. People have trouble answering that question.

  • avatar
    grzydj

    This, in a country that invented the concept of globalization of cars and manufacturing and perfected it.

  • avatar
    geeber

    How, exactly, would a Chevrolet Aveo fit into this picture? It’s certainly not a “foreign nameplate,” but it isn’t built in the U.S. by the UAW.

  • avatar
    werewolf34

    Only cars subsidized by the US taxpayer allowed to pay here

  • avatar

    The Ford plant in Oakville has a similar policy.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    I’m impressed with the number of US veterans who drive foreign nameplates. Veterans have sacrificed a lot more than union dues in defense of the US. The UAW could learn from them.

    The UAW’s approach is completely ineffective in their ‘war’ against foreign nameplates. Even if every one of its 355k members drove a foreign nameplate instead of an ‘American’ nameplate, it would only alter the sales landscape by 3%.

    Or is this more than a consumer decision; is it akin to carrying a King James Bible into a mosque? With the UAW, I already know the answer.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    So would Chevy that is made in Korea a Korean car or a Volvo made in China a Chinese car? I think it goes more with the origin of the manufacturer themselves as apposed to where a certain car line is being made. Example: Toyota is a japanese car company period. Just because the Camry and Avalon are made here as transplants doesn’t automatically make Toyota an American company.

    • 0 avatar
      aznconfused

      You may be right but I’d rather buy a foreign “transplant” car built in the US than a domestic “transplant” car built overseas in lower income countries. I’d assume the average employee wage is substantially higher in the home country due to white-collar upper management, engineering, & R&D located there versus an overseas transplant primarily employing blue-collar factory workers with a sprinkling of higher-paid managers and specialists, etc. Would you rather have money spent towards supporting thousands of middle-class, middle-America workers with thousands more from suppliers? Or upper management who decide its best to close shop and move production outside America’s borders at the loss of said thousands of employees and thousands more of suppliers’ employees (although the UAW didn’t exactly make it easy for them).
      Granted, the motives behind creating transplant factories are ultimately selfish and lucrative in nature (e.g. hedging risks), purchasing a car from the American Detroit Three purely because of perceived “Americanism” could very well result in less financial support of “American workers.”

  • avatar
    seemsartless

    Sad indication of where their focus is: protectionism, not competition.

    The best sign of the bunch is:

    “No!
    Foreign car parking”

  • avatar
    rpol35

    It’s like NASCAR; Boss Hog wanted to keep the Toyota Camry, which is built in Kentucky out of competition, but they were OK with the Chevy Impala, Ford Fusion and Dodge Charger which are made in Ontario, Mexico and Ontario repectively.

  • avatar
    mikey

    What up Ed N? Trying to get som hits eh? The anti union types love this stuff.

    So when I was a kid, my buddys dad was a General Foreman in the plant. Thats two steps up from a line worker,and in those days was considered middle management. Mr —- was a dead ringer for Sargent Carter fron the “Gomer Pyle USMC” TV series. He was rough, and tough and would arm wrestle anybody for a beer. I can’t remember anybody beating him.

    To this day, I believe it was Mr—– that made the phone call to get me in at the motors,but he always denied it.

    I’ll never forget Mr —-‘s reaction when another budddy parked a brand new 1970 Swinger 340 in thier driveway.

    Y’A GOT 30 SECONDS SON TO REMOVE THAT F____KEN THING FROM MY DRIVEWAY,OR I’LL BURN THE F—-KEN PIECE OF GARBAGE.

    We all found ourselves working at GM in next few years. Everbody except for the guy with the Swinger.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      So you support UAW bully tactics if it gets you a job?

    • 0 avatar
      Znork

      Mikey, with that recruitment policy, it’s no wonder GM went down the toilet. I’m also at the factory floor, and neither I nor my colleagues give a toss what we’re driving, our political views or our private life just as long as we work together and do our job.

  • avatar
    JeremyR

    Just for kicks, I’d love to see a sign forbidding domestic/UAW-built vehicles…

  • avatar
    Hank

    And UAW folks wonder why so many Americans are sick of their antics. D’oh!

    Reminds me of a conversation I had with a friend who just bought a Town & Country because they only buy ‘Merican built cars. I asked why they chose to buy a van assembled in Canada, designed by German-owned Chrysler and built by Fiat-owned Chrysler if they really wanted an ‘Merican built car? No answer. They seemed shocked at the news. I think I made them mad when I said I wanted to buy an American built van, so I bought an Odyssey built in good ol’ Alabama. ;-)

  • avatar
    mcs

    All Vehicles with a Foreign Nameplate

    I thought most of those plastic nameplates were made in China these days anyway. How do you tell if it’s domestic or foreign – is it stamped on the back or something? I guess if you ordered the “nameplate delete” option you’d be good to go.

    I wonder if there’s a sign about wearers of foreign clothing or users of foreign personal electronics once you get inside? Maybe a special far away restroom for wearers of foreign underwear?

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Sad. Pathetic. Moronic.

  • avatar
    mikey

    OKAY guys, just fire away. So far none of you have any idea of the culture on the plant floor.

    I’ll come back about midnight, and see if any of you get it.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Mikey,

      You’re under the impression that they care. They don’t, really.

    • 0 avatar
      jaje

      In the D3, the UAW is out for themselves and themselves only. Inside the UAW the mgmt is in it for themselves only. UAW doesn’t care about its host longevity, it only cares about growing stronger and richer. Reminds me of what cancer does to its host…bleed it dry until the host dies and so does the cancer within.

    • 0 avatar
      JeremyR

      What does the “culture on the plant floor” have to do with anything? Will we find similar signs at “transplant” or non-union factories? Why not?

    • 0 avatar
      nonce

      If there is a culture on the floor, shouldn’t the guy being paid $40 to mop it have cleaned it up by now?

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Mikey,

      I get why both union AND non-union employees would frown upon not buying one of their own, but you have to acknowledge these signs are relics of the past that need to be done away with. Ignoring that Accords are made in Ohio, Altimas in Tennessee, BMW’s in S. Carolina, and the Fusion is made in Mexico, the G8 made in Austrailia, the Regal in Germany, etc.

      When does common sense start entering the minds of the UAW? Would a new Regal, G8 or Fusion get towed?

      Besides, the signs comes across as racist.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      @mikey: Based upon your story above, it sounds like the bully culture of the union on the plant floor is OK with you, since it supposedly protects the workers.

      But a 76% decline in UAW membership over 35 years tells me it’s not working. Mr. King’s new aggressive approach will only accelerate the decline.

      There is a perception gap, but it seems to be on the part of the UAW.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      I get it. It’s about morale.

      But morale doesn’t sell the product unless it has somehow led to better product and lower cost.

      Unfortunately, beyond their intended effect, the signs have an unfortunate side effect; they reveal something ugly about the UAW. THey practically scream, “our cars aren’t as good, so we’ll bully you into buying them.”

      Where I work, good morale comes from good leadership, a job well done and successful products.

  • avatar
    davey49

    Personally I’d love to see signs like that around here but the Northeast has a hate for D3 nameplates.
    Assembly is less than 20% of the value of car production
    The reason you would buy a foreign made car with a domestic brand is because the domestic company earns/spends more money in the US on those than a transplant company earns/spends in the US.
    Buying an Aveo or Fusion helps more Americans than buying a Camry or Accord.

    • 0 avatar
      aspade

      Final assembly is a small part of total costs but manufacturing the parts being assembled amounts to most of the cost of the car.

      75 cents on the dollar building an Accord or Camry goes to US or Canadian suppliers.

      The corresponding number for the Fusion is 25 cents. The Aveo is 1 cent.

    • 0 avatar
      davey49

      But you’re only referring to assembly, the money/cost I’m referring to is development, marketing, financial, engineering, administrative and others that go with running a company that produces goods.

    • 0 avatar
      caboaz

      Davey, you mean all that money/cost stuff that went into my Tundra like the engineering done in Michigan, the design done in California, the engines made in Alabama, the transmissions from North Carolina, and the final assembly in Texas? Perhaps you’d also like to include the marketing and financing from Toyota U.S.A headquarters in California. Because the only thing about my Tundra that is Japanese is the name of the parent company that owns the U.S. company (Toyota Manufacturing U.S.A.) that made it. Should I be concerned that Louis Chevrolet was from Switzerland? Seems to me you have an awfully big problem there with the flagship brand being of FOREIGN origin.

    • 0 avatar

      I get the “assembly is just a part of the big picture” line from my UAW-boosting friends all the time. I’m starting to wonder if it’s maybe a union line the leadership encourages. Yes, assembly is just part of the picture. Which is why I’d feel much more supportive of American jobs buying a Camry (assembly, design, and most of the parts are of domestic origin) than I would buying, say, a Ford Fusion (basic design is Japanese, parts are derived from both Mazda and Volvo, and it’s built in Mexico.) My gut feeling is that it’s racism, pure and simple. But that’s just me.

    • 0 avatar
      tom

      Last time I checked, the “Big Three” didn’t pump cash into the American economy but rather sucked money out of it, no matter where their cars are built…

  • avatar
    segfault

    You stay classy, UAW!

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    It’s a slap in the face reguardless of where your import was implanted.
    I mean if I’m going to an MLK parade, I’m parking the ‘General Lee’ miles away.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      It’s different. The car you buy is a value proposition, pure and simple. If you’re driving a Toyota, it means GM lost that round based on what you wanted in a car, how much you were willing to pay and, likely, how well you thought it had been built. Better luck next time.

      And about half the market is foreign nameplates. The UAW had better get used to this.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Absolutely, D3 thought they knew what we wanted/needed. Fail.
      So much for market research. We could have built a better car all along. We put a man on the Moon…
      Today both foreign and domestics are saying we don’t want a compact diesel truck. Welcome Mahindra.
      The UAW has little to do with a car’s design, fuel economy or marketing/research but are free to make a stand or send a message to owners of foreign brands even if only half it’s members own domestics.
      So you get extra exercise. So what? Sounds like it’s worth it, no?

  • avatar
    wmba

    How likely am I or most of you to have a reason to visit a UAW local? Their signs are irrelevant to my (your) life.

    On the other hand, I would be pissed off as hell if I were prevented from parking normally at a Ford, GM or Chrysler plant. Those people live in glass houses, what with company-owned plants hammering together cars in all manner of foreign countries and pretending they’re true-blue domestics.

    Probably illegal in Canada and against a person’s charter rights due to discrimination, never mind that Ford Oakville does it, apparently.

    Cross Ford off my consideration list. GM never made it in the first place.

  • avatar
    cRacK hEaD aLLeY

    PLEASE can a BMW/Mercedes-driving Jewish lawyer opinionate on the legality of these exclusion rules?

  • avatar
    Boxofrain

    So, what if you pulled up in a Mazda B4000 pickup? It says Mazda but it’s a Ford Ranger. Even the engine says Ford Motor Company on it.

    Think about it, what if we followed them and wanted a small 4 cylinder car? Our choices would be Cobalt, Focus or Caliber. Gimme a break! Who can blame us for buying “foreign cars”, many of which are made right in Canada and the US.

  • avatar
    Jeff Semenak

    I’m hoping Fiats can now park at Chrysler plants and, their local union halls.

  • avatar
    Ingvar

    So, I guess Alan Mulally parked his Lexus out in the street?

  • avatar
    ajla

    Seems like the UAW/CAW needs to mellow out.

    It’s just a job.

    And it’s just a car.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    I work for a company that produces industrial-grade purpose-built headsets, but the office is filled with people wearing cheapo commodity headsets from any number of other mfrs.

    Why?
    1. They couldn’t afford our headset.
    2. Our headset doesn’t serve their purpose.

    So nobody in my office cares about it, but we do learn by observing these other products.

    What if luxury car manufacturers imposed similar UAW rules on their employees? They’d have to pay them a higher wage just to purchase an expensive car they don’t need.

    What if the Aerospace workers at Boeing pulled such a stunt, saying you must travel only on Boeing aircraft?

  • avatar
    RRocket

    This is why the UAW is clueless, and keeps getting less and less support.

    So let me see if I have this right:

    It’s forbidden to park a Camry in the lot, even though it has more domestic part content than most “American” cars, and ignore the fact that it also employs at a fair wage and puts food on the table for many Americans.

    But it’s OK to park a Fusion or Fiesta on the lot, where those building the car are not Americans, but Mexicans. And those Mexicans are paid a scab wage of $4/hr.

    Ok..so what’s the UAW’s message again??

  • avatar
    Amendment X

    Wow, I had NO IDEA this was going on.

  • avatar
    threeer

    No…what they really need is a sign that reads the following:

    “Only Ford Motor Company and General Motors plated vehicles, built with at least 75% domestic content and assembled in the United States of America may park here.”

    (Chrysler is owned by Fiat now, remember?)…

    net result? Virtually empty parking lots…

  • avatar
    Bill Wade

    I was told to remove my Mitsubishi Mighty Max truck from a union jobsite. Since it was a large job I was going to be on for months I went home, peeled off the Mighty Max stickers and stuck Dodge D50 stickers on it (exact same truck at the time). The union guys were happy I came back in an “American” truck.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      My friend’s mom had one of those Mitsus. It was rear ended by a dump truck and the body and bed had to be replaced. The Dodge body was more readily available so they put that body and bed on it and it picked up the nickname “D-ram”.

  • avatar
    mcs

    Here’s the official UAW Buying Guide. It’s actually not as bad as you’d think with cars like the Eclipse, Galant, and Mazda6 on the list. The list is a little out of date and if you remove the extinct and badge engineered duplicate vehicles from the list, it’s not very long.

  • avatar
    supremebrougham

    I remember back in 1996 visiting family and friends in Michigan (I was living in Florida at the time). I was invited to a graduation open house for a friend of mine. The open house was being held at a UAW hall in Ypsilanti, MI. When I got there the parking lot was almost full, but as luck would have it, there was a spot almost in front of the main entrance. So naturally I took it. As I was walking away from my Japan-built 1995 Toyota Corolla with Florida plates, I noticed a sign that said “No foreign cars allowed, will be towed!”

    Niice…

    Thankfully, the car was still there, and still in one piece when I left.

    These days I can park my Mexican-made HHR anywhere I like, and no one says a word…

  • avatar
    GS650G

    So those Mexican built Fords, Canadian built Dodges, and Euro built Gm cars along with the Korean built ones have to park in the back? No?

    How about the US built Hondas, Toyota and Nissans along with the US built Hyundais?

    All this as GM moves operations to China bankrolled by the US taxpayer.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    You guys/galls are being really thick. When you drive a Honda you’re waving a flag with big red dot, regardless of where it was assembled. You have a ‘right’ to do so, of course but feel ‘free’ to park it on the street.
    Yes, the UAW is guilty of oversimplification but let’s not be too dence here.

    • 0 avatar
      nonce

      Just buy Ameruhcan and no one gets hurt.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      DenverMike is correct… when you buy an Accord, the car indeed was made in a place that has a flag with a big, red dot on it.

      http://www.50states.com/flag/ohflag.htm

    • 0 avatar
      poltergeist

      Dence??? Really?

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      That’s your argument? My penmanship? Well is it ‘dents’? Or ‘dense’? Yep, that looks betta.
      Let me no, Teacha.

    • 0 avatar

      It’s hardly un-American to insist on buying and driving a quality vehicle… and it’s hardly surprising that many of the highest-quality vehicles haven’t had a single UAW paw laid upon them.

    • 0 avatar
      poltergeist

      How does one have “penmanship” while typing on a keyboard? It’s called SPELLING…

      Considering some of my tax dollars have gone to keep the UAW folks employed (at absolutely no benefit to me) I should be able to park my Honda or Nissan wherever the hell I want….in fact they should send me a thank you note (that’s what my Mom taught me to do a long time ago when I’d get money from my Grandma at Christmas).

      What has the UAW done for me???

  • avatar
    L'avventura

    Are Mexican-made Fords allowed to park there? Those vehicles are not UAW-made, and certainly less American then a Camry made in Kentucky or Indiana using 85% American parts.

    Honest question, is the UAW really merely xenophobic or a mismanaged organization that is acting against its own self-interests?

    The Detroit 3 have built dozens of factories in Mexico targeted at the North American market since Detroit’s decline, you would think, if the UAW were reasonable with wages and demands that those tens of thousands of jobs would have stayed in the US (likely near Detroit). After all, during the time that the Detroit 3 were building factories in Mexico, foreign car companies have been massively expanding in America, particularly in the non-union south.

    In retrospect, if the UAW were better managed, they should have bargained in the 90s, made necessary concessions in demands and had foreign car makers to setup factories in the Detroit area using UAW labor instead of the South far away (at that time) from the established supply chain in Detroit.

  • avatar
    fiasco

    VW Routan is a CAW car…heh, heh, heh.

    The new Sienna I just signed my life away on today has something like 75% domestic content and was designed in Michigan and built/assembled in Indiana. My Subarus were built in Indiana. My Ford product was built in Cologne, Germany (it’s a Merkur XR4Ti).

    I would have shopped Ford and GM minivans if they’d had something to offer me. The Chrysler/Dodge/Fiat vans just look like something my 3 year old assembled with his Legos. The VW Crouton looks better, but when I think about what’s underneath I can’t justify paying Sienna-like prices for a rebadged Dodge.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    So, where does this leave my Westmoreland, PA, UAW-assembled 86 Golf? Can I park it or not?

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    The UAW could have spun this and not had the PR issue they have. Mandating the policy and the signage to read that UAW built vehicles get preferential parking privileges instead of penalties for non UAW vehicles would have been more palatable and easier to defend.

    I admire balls, especially big brass ones, but this is neither a time nor an issue worth laying them out on a table for.

  • avatar
    thebeelzebubtrigger

    “The core hypocrisy of the UAW is that it claims to work on behalf of workers everywhere, while actually serving only the interests of its most senior members. And the cognitive dissonance produced by this grotesque contradiction can lead to some interesting challenges in the day-to-day life of the union, particularly in the design of parking lot signs designed to keep the competition out.”

    That’s nothing but pure political trolling. You know, there really are only two kinds of right-wingers: the sociopathic rich and the fools who are brainwashed by them.

    Now, can we read about cars without the armchair pinhead political nonsense? Please?

    • 0 avatar

      You know, those union parking lot signs are old news. Really old. Nothing new here, no recent development.

      What’s the point of this post? TTAC hates the UAW? Dislikes unions in general? As if that point hasn’t been pounded at least three feet below the ground by now?

      And: “BMW/Mercedes-driving Jewish lawyer”? Yikes!

      It’s gettin’ mighty cranky-wingnut in here lately.

    • 0 avatar

      Ahem… Beater fails to research before commenting. {facepalm}. So much for shooting from the hip.

      Wish I’d have known the new UAW prez had flogged this issue recently before I’d posted. Now this photo gallery makes some sense. Of course, I had to see this article linked in Jalopnik before the light came on, some three days late. D’oh!

      But it’s never to late to own up, so, apologies to all for my cranky reply.

  • avatar
    Geo. Levecque

    Somehow I don’t think that this Policy on Parking exists here in Canada, maybe Mikey can maybe explain, I attended the CAW School at Port Elgin Ontario a few years back for On the Job training in another Union not CAW, I was driving a Honda Civic at the time, nothing happened to my Car then, I agree its a sick approach and the UAW should be ashamed to show there ignorance in this regard, no wonder there Membership is on the decline, better Unions all over the Western World have done so much for the Working Men and Women imho!

    • 0 avatar
      shaker

      I agree — unions have a place in the history of worker rights in the USA and around the world. But in the case of some unions, the pendulum has swung too far in the other direction, leading to a sense of entitlement, and poor quality of work. Just think of the junk that the “Big 3″ was screwing together in that 70’s that was so bad that cheaply made tin cans (the first Japanese and Euro imports) started to make a dent in what had been a “dynasty”.

      It can be said that without that “foreign” competition, vehicles made by the UAW would be the same, de-contented shitboxes that they’ve been for 40 years – just think of the 4 y.o. Malibu, new Cruze, 2012 Focus, etc. – vehicles that have just started to become competitive.

  • avatar
    drifter

    All UAW workers who show up for work in foreign made underwear must be stripped naked, wait a minute…the plant would look like a nude colony then.

  • avatar
    BuzzDog

    I’d like to see what would happen if a disabled person in a non-D3 vehicle was forced to park in a faraway lot.

    As much as the Americans with Disabilities Act goes overboard at times, this is one time I’d like to see Federal law used against the UAW’s myopic mentality.

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    Amazing.
    It´s like a car version of apartheid.
    “Whites Only”

    I don´t know if this is common among other car manufacturers, but i doubt it.

  • avatar
    Morea

    With the exception of the (very old and rusty) United Steelworkers sign, chances are the steel for those other signs came from China or Korea.

    Why doesn’t the UAW support the United Steelworkers???

  • avatar
    HalfMast

    I am actually torn a little on this… I would think that as an employee of a company, you’d want to see that company do well and thus, purchase their product. And as a company I’d want to encourage that. But what I wouldn’t want to see would be examples of cars made by my closest competitors. i.e., why is it okay to park a Ford at the Lordstown plant? Sure, maybe not everyone wants a Cobalt (or Cruze now), but you’d want them to at least buy a GM product.

    As a union, I’d also want to encourage my members to support the products that those union members built. But that means that if my local only supports a Ford plant, then make the Chrysler products park in the far lot with the Toyota’s. MAYBE this could get complicated at the union headquarters, but at that point, who cars?

    The problem is that for some people, this isn’t about supporting your company or your union anymore, it’s about pushing an anti-foreign car attitude. It’s turning “thanks for supporting our company and brothers” into “don’t be a dumb-a** who buys foreign”.

    If I ran one of these plants, there’d be three parking lots. Closest for people driving products that came directly from my plant. Next out would be those who came from the same company. Furthest out would be every other car, regardless who made them, what union made them, what country they were built in. And I’d encourage my local to do the same!

    FYI, I’m NOT a union man, I DON’T work in automotive, and I DON’T drive a Big 3 car. But I can understand people who have pride in what they do.

  • avatar
    MadHungarian

    So, let’s get a caravan of Ramblers, Studebakers and Hudsons, and see if they’ll let us park in the lot at the location of Photo #424.


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