By on July 7, 2010

Ford was the best-selling brand in America over the first half of 2010, outselling second-place Chevrolet by over 70k units. Sadly, we don’t have the fleet sales breakdown for this data, because both Ford and Chevy have been dogged by indicators of heavy fleet-sales reliance all year. And volume means very little if it’s hurting resale and eroding a brand. Speaking of brand erosion, did you know that the zombie brand Saturn sold better (6,480 units) since January than Jaguar or Saab? With Hyundai-Kia headed for a combined million-sales year, there’s a new pack forming behind the Korean brands, composed of Subaru, VW and Mazda. Neither true mass-market brands nor premium players, these three brands will be interesting to watch over the next several years.

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29 Comments on “Six Month Sales By Brand: Ford Comes Out On Top...”


  • avatar
    86er

    And volume means very little if it’s hurting resale and eroding a brand.

    Conjecture. I pose my own conjecture that Ford and GM are filling new orders held for about a year from contractors and the like.

    Fleet does not always mean rental cars, people. Let’s ration this trite factoid.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Hyundai-Kia stands at 425,852 according to this chart. They need to sell 574,148 in the remaining six months to reach a cool million. That 148,296-car increase is nearly the total amount GMC sold in from January thru June! Volume aside, Hyundai and Kia aren’t inordinately dependent on fleet sales or excessive incentives – they’re selling better cars than they used to with the best warranties attached to them. Their future certainly looks bright. Now someone tell South Korean buyers to stay excited!

    • 0 avatar
      jj99

      I am suprised that Kia and Hyundai numbers are so low. I see so many brand new ones in the east, especially with young people. The pattern in the east is old folks buy Ford, GM. Middle age buy Toyota, Honda, Mazda. Young people buy Kia, Hyundai, Subaru, some Honda, small Jeep.

    • 0 avatar
      mdensch

      Kias and Hyundais seem to be staples of every car rental lot I’ve seen lately.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      @jj99

      Why are you surprised?

      It’s not that long ago that H/K’s combined share of the US auto market was barely 6%; presently, they place 5th in sales and are increasing their lead on Nissan.

      I wouldn’t be shocked if H/K catch up to Honda in sales in 4-5 yrs time (once they have launched all their new models).

      The turnaround of Buick is pretty impressive considering that it has been done thus far mainly w/ 2 models, the LaCrosse and Enclave.

      If the Regal is a sales success, Buick should increase its sales lead over Cadillac (Caddy needs its new product STAT).

  • avatar
    jj99

    I mentioned in an earlier posting that a large government parking lot near my job has hundreds of new fusion and escape vehicles. Also, many new chrysler cars. It is good our government supports these companies. I hope these companies can survive if these type of sales slow.

  • avatar
    JT

    Note to the boss (Edward)

    Thanks for putting current data in red in the recent charts and the reference material in gray. Easier to read this way, and more intuitive.

    Thanks
    JT

  • avatar
    getacargetacheck

    It’s going to be interesting watching “Dodge” and “Ram” fall down somewhere under Hyundai and Kia next year if Chrysler retains its “separation” of Dodge and Ram. Fred Diaz has already stated that Rams will wear Dodge badges and Dodge VINs so the whole “strategy” seems like marketing hocus-pocus to me. And every time I see Chevrolet sales trail Ford’s by a number well within GMC’s sales total I just have to wonder why keep GMC? Yeah, yeah I’ve heard all the arguments about profits and the supposed “upscale” psychographics of GMC buyers. We all heard the same thing before about how different Saturn and Pontiac buyers were too. Then GM blew the doors off the sales charts with only four brands versus six.

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      Reminds me of 1960, when the Valiant debuted. Chrysler initially marketed the Valiant as a separate marque. When sales were totalled for the 1960 model year, it turned out that Plymouth had fallen from its traditional third place in the sales race. (The “standard” 1960 Plymouth was a stinker in the styling department.)

      Chrysler quickly added the Valiant sales to Plymouth’s sales, and the Valiant was badged as a Plymouth for 1961. I’ll bet that we see a repeat with Dodge and Ram.

  • avatar
    oboylepr

    Good news for Ford and well deserved too. Ironic that the Toyota witchhunt did not benefit the ‘house’ brand so much.

  • avatar
    Z71_Silvy

    Ford was the best-selling brand in America over the first half of 2010, outselling second-place Chevrolet by over 70k units.

    Fleet sales will do that.

    I have seen all sorts of new Ford’s on the rental car lots. Taurus, Flex, Mustang, Escape, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      What helps Ford in fleets sales to the govt. and corporations are hybrid versions of the Escape and Fusion.

    • 0 avatar

      “I have seen all sorts of new Ford’s on the rental car lots. Taurus, Flex, Mustang, Escape, etc”

      You’re seeing what you want to. Your blatantly biased observation holds no value whatsoever as a measure of success.

      And the plural of “Ford” requires no apostrophe.

    • 0 avatar
      Z71_Silvy

      What helps Ford in fleets sales to the govt. and corporations are hybrid versions of the Escape and Fusion.

      Hardly…Ford (stupidly) limits the production of their hybrids to 25K units a year.

      You’re seeing what you want to. Your blatantly biased observation holds no value whatsoever as a measure of success.

      That makes no sense…a Taurus on a rental car lot…is a Taurus on a rental car lot. Period.

      And if GM is fair game to use the fleet argument to explain sales…then Ford is too. And it still holds water…Ford resorts to fleet dumping (like old GM) to boost sales numbers. We know this…Ford is a very fleet heave manufacturer. Just take one look at their fleet website…all of their mediocre appliances are on there.

    • 0 avatar
      NulloModo

      GM sells to fleets, as does Ford, and Chrysler, and Toyota, and every other major automaker. Fleet sales in general aren’t bad, plenty of fleet sales make good money, and even rental car fleet sales have benefits. Ford isn’t “dumping” any model into fleets. Rental fleet mix is being kept very low except for things like the Grand Marquis, Crown Vic, Town Car, and Focus.

      Truck sales to construction and utility fleets make a lot of money, and Ford owns those markets. Sales of sedans as company cars don’t hurt residuals, don’t dilute the brand, and make good money.

      Even rental fleet sales often bring customers into showrooms, I’ve sold plenty of cars to people who rented one and liked it so much they came in to buy one for their next vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Loser

      “Ford resorts to fleet dumping (like old GM) to boost sales numbers. We know this…Ford is a very fleet heave manufacturer”.

      Month after month you continue to ignore the fact that the “new” GM has been fleet dumping at a higher rate than Ford.

      “nearly one in three vehicles sold by GM last month went to a fleet, a percentage that accounts for the lion’s share of GM’s sales growth. Once again, Detroit seems addicted to fleet sales”…

      http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/gm-core-brand-sales-up-36-percent-in-june-on-strong-fleet-sales/

    • 0 avatar
      MM

      When doing a 2-week rental from Hertz in MO a coupla months ago, was offered a ’10 Malibu that was, to put it nicely, “craptacular.” The lot was full of ‘bu’s, Impalas, a handful of Camrys and a couple of Focuses, Sonatas, Explorers and Traverses. The ‘bu had no guts at all, was very cheap-feeling inside, and the kids said the rear seats “suuuck-diddily-ucked.” Didn’t even make the exit gate before returning it to its stall. The attendant changed it out for a Camry, saying “that happens a lot with those cars.”

      Fleet sales may be fleet sales, but if rental companies can’t even force them on customers, me thinks that Hertz buying more of that make/model becomes a losing proposition… unless they’re so heavily discounted they become impossible to ignore.

    • 0 avatar
      geeber

      I see lots of Camaros at the rental lot just outside of Harrisburg International Airport. Plenty of Malibus and Impalas, too, along with several Nissan Versas and Altimas, several Hyundais and a smattering of Camrys and Corollas.

      Ford sells to rental car companies, too, but a very large portion of its fleet sales consist of sales to government entities and corporations. (If I recall correctly, Ford leads in fleet sales to customers in these categories.)

      Those vehicles don’t get dumped back on the used car market within 12-18 months.

  • avatar
    dcdriver

    What’s interesting to me is that GMC is in ninth place overall considering they only sell 5 models (Terrain, Acadia, Yukon, Canyon, and Sierra) all of which have identical Chevy models available too. (by my count Toyota sells 15 different models)

    So I guess there is a reason to have GMC around after all.

  • avatar
    Mercennarius

    I’m wondering when Infiniti is finally going to pass up Acura in sales. Infinitis product line is just so much better and more appealing then what Acura currently has to offer…

    • 0 avatar
      dcdriver

      For Infiniti to rise up the charts it needs better offerings in the SUV/CUV categories. When I say “better” I mean “more appealing to the masses”. It needs something to compete directly with the RX or the X5, ML and MDX. Those things sell like hotcakes. The FX is a nice vehicle, but it’s not for the masses and the QX is just a huge behemoth that will probably never sell well.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      What Infiniti needs is another “hit” other than the G37 sedan/coupe.

      Sales of the FX have slumped ever since Infiniti made it look bizarre and the new M has been a disappointment in sales thus far.

    • 0 avatar
      GarbageMotorsCo.

      The EX35 is an unknown Gem. Terrible rear leg room and a smaller cargo area than it’s competitors keeps it off many peoples shopping lists.

      But step away from all that and look at it from an enthusiasts point of view and if you don’t have kids, it is damn near perfect. Close to 300hp, underpinnings from the G, 9.3g harddrive, voice activated Navi/Bluetooth, Around-view camera (a must have), self healing paint, awesome seats and Infinitis’ knockout interior design and excellent build quality for the same money as a Chevy Equinox rental car. Dealers are taking 6000 bucks off the top and some dealers near me are up to 6900 dollars.

      35 grand is a steal. Definitley a hidden gem for single folks and empty nesters.

  • avatar

    As a brand sold here in the US, where are smart’s numbers? Are they rolled into the Mercedes/Maybach totals?

  • avatar
    gimmeamanual

    Anyone else look at that chart and say “wow, that’s a lot of Jeeps”?

  • avatar
    Bridge2farr

    “The ‘bu had no guts at all, was very cheap-feeling inside, and the kids said the rear seats “suuuck-diddily-ucked.” Didn’t even make the exit gate before returning it to its stall. The attendant changed it out for a Camry, saying “that happens a lot with those cars.”
    LMAO!. Typical TTAC anecdotal BS story from a hater. Not surprised the well-raised offspring speak that way.

  • avatar
    Bridge2farr

    My own relevant tale- Recently at Hertz lot and handed the keys to a new Camry. Upon accellerating, the pedal stuck to the floor as the engine revved madly and the car went out of control smashing into a fence. Luckily, the motor had seized due to defective engine parts. Also, the frame collapsed rapidly due to excessive corrosion. After being pulled from the wreckage, I was offerred a Prius. I immediately ran away!


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