By on May 12, 2010

Chrysler has announced pricing for the new Jeep Grand Cherokee, arguably the most important vehicle it will launch this year. The cheapest option, the Laredo 4×2 (which isn’t even mentioned in Chrysler’s release), starts at an MSRP of $30,995 (including destination charge, confirmed via Twitter)… at least until ChryCo rolls out the $5k cash back it’s offering on the outgoing model. Hit the jump for trim levels and corresponding pricing.

From Chrysler’s press release:

2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 4×4
Standard features on the Laredo 4×4 model includes Quadra-Trac I 4×4 system, 3.6-liter V-6 engine, Keyless Enter-N-Go, Electronic Stability Control, Hill Start Assist, Electronic Roll Mitigation, Trailer-Sway Control, front-seat side air bags and side-curtain air bags for front and rear, active head restraints, power 8-way driver seat with power 4-way lumbar adjust, fog lamps, leather-wrapped steering wheel with audio controls, SIRIUS Satellite Radio and 17-inch aluminum wheels.

Optional features include a 360-horsepower 5.7-liter V-8 engine and a Trailer Tow Group.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 4×4 pricing: $32,995 (including $780 for destination)

2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 4×4
Limited 4×4 models add features that include Quadra-Trac II® 4×4 system with Selec-Terrain, front and second-row heated leather seats, memory settings, Bi-Xenon High Intensity Discharge auto-leveling headlamps with SmartBeam®, CommandView dual-pane panoramic sun roof, Parkview® rear back-up camera, Parksense® rear park assist, premium audio, automatic temperature control, 18-inch aluminum wheels, Garmin® navigation, rain-sensitive wipers and bright door handles.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 4×4 pricing: $39,995 (including $780 for destination)

2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland 4×4
Overland 4×4 models add numerous features including Quadra-Lift air suspension, premium interior with Nappa leather-trimmed and heated seats, vented front seats, wood/leather-wrapped heated steering wheel with memory, power tilt/telescope steering column, wood bezels, leather-stitched instrument panel/doors/center console armrest, power liftgate, and 20-inch aluminum wheels.

Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland 4×4 pricing $42,995 (including $780 for destination)

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28 Comments on “2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee Priced: 4X2 Starts At $30,995, 4X4 Starts At $32,995...”


  • avatar
    segfault

    I’m glad Consumer Reports has proactively certified the reliability of this new model. All of Jeep’s current models seem to be below-average according to their ratings.

  • avatar
    eastcoastcar

    I hope they are able to provide zero percent financing for like 8 years, since at the rate America is going, few will be able to afford these things.

    • 0 avatar
      john.fritz

      I had the same thought. Who in the hell is buying these things? Let’s say we purchase the el cheapo Jeep for 30 out the door. Finance it for four years through the local Credit Union at around seven percent. And…

      You got $718.00 you can part with every month?

    • 0 avatar
      Blunozer

      I just bought a 2010 Grand Cherokee with the Hemi.

      With all the discounts, I got it for $10k less than sticker. The payments are just slightly more than my Miata (family changes).

      Who’s buying these? Guys that need a true midsized SUV, not a car-based crossover. Its got a gonzo V8 engine, great off-road ability, and the ability to tow 7200lbs. Usually if you want that you have to get a full-sized pick up or SUV like a Yukahoe.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    Don’t forget, this came from Cerberus management. It’s the cheapest way to compete in the luxury CUV market, trading on the cache of Jeep’s 4×4 heritage. Dodge isn’t lux enough, and a Chrysler rebadge would look obvious. Upscale customers went for the old Wagoneer, didn’t they?

  • avatar
    obbop

    “Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland 4×4 pricing $42,995 (including $780 for destination”

    That paid for my entire shanty and the yearly property tax is a mere $306 and I can scrounge enough aluminum cans part-time to cover the yearly liability/fire/etc. insurance and though I abhor the thought of sharing the shanty I could likely rent a room and by charging a meager amount could be very selective who infests the abode and conceivably have fixed costs paid for and with utilities shared by both parties have minimal aluminum can collecting to perform and if it is a widow lady with accumulated wealth or an income stream may be able to convince her to cover all costs AND pay the food bill, especially if I do the cooking and the dishes.

    Thus the shock echoing through my endo-skeleton when I espy the possible asking price for a depreciating asset that may be of sub-par quality and of diminutive size that would be much less spacious than some conveyances of half the price yet offering more square footage that maximizes the comfort of dwelling within the vehicle if future economic calamity requires the owner to relinquish their shanty, whether bought/rented/leased/whatever and commence dwelling in their conveyance to avoid abject homelessness that MAY become a future norm in living styles if the class war continues in favor of the minority taking the USA down the path of wrack and ruin.

  • avatar
    postjosh

    jeez, not only does it now look like a poser’s jeep, with 4×2 it is a poser’s jeep! chrysler has managed to build a lincoln suv! how could cerberus not understand there own brand? it reminds me of when gm moved the ignition key on the chevy blazer to the center console and announced to the world that they had created a new saab.

    • 0 avatar
      Roundel

      Lincoln Suv? What else do you see with those herbs you smoke?
      I see a gradual evolution of the current model, complete with the 7 slot grille thats been a Jeep trademark… since forever.
      I also don’t see how the base price is all that out of control…. but hey, this is Chrysler right…. bash on.

    • 0 avatar

      Fiasler is betting big on this… thing. They will be sorely disappointed.

  • avatar
    holydonut

    Wait, so an 2010 Accord Crosstour EX 2WD 5-Spd-auto (the cheapest variant) has an MSRP (including destination) of $30,380. The 2011 4×2 GC is $30,995. And you guys are complaining that the Grand Cherokee is too expensive? Go do a search for the Crosstour review on this site and let me know how many people griped about the pricing within the comments section.

    If someone jumps in and says the interior of the 2011 Laredo GC is crap – then that individual hasn’t been inside a 2011 GC.

    I think the criticisms over a vehicle before its launch represent why so many people have the perception that TTAC intentionally singles out particular automakers with negative flak. The readership/comments are obviously slanted, and in turn, this makes TTAC seem negatively slanted. After all, TTAC asserts its audience is the “best and brightest” and turns to them for insights.

    BTW, a 2010 4×2 Ford Explorer XLT with the V6 is $30,095 after destination. Maybe the TTAC writers need to make a thread about that so you all can flame the Explorer too.

    • 0 avatar

      Let me try to explain the fallacy of that argument as clearly as I can.

      You’re comparing Fords and Hondas to a… Chrysler.

      See where ya went wrong there?

    • 0 avatar
      gimmeamanual

      Both are too much. I got a big reality slap in the face in late 2006 when I went looking for a new car and decided to check out domestic SUVs. Over $30k sticker for a base Explorer 4×4 (if you can find one) is ridiculous.

    • 0 avatar
      segfault

      The Crossturd will likely be very dependable, get decent mileage, and hold its resale value well, in spite of its awful styling. The Grand Cherokee, not so much.

    • 0 avatar
      windswords

      Without knowing the price other vehicles to compare this to you have no basis for saying that the GC is cheap, about right, or expensive. The GC is no more expensive than other vehicles in it’s class. It’s certainly cheaper (and more reliable) than a Land Rover.

    • 0 avatar
      wp8thsub

      I didn’t go back and search all the threads – but wansn’t the Accord Crosstour’s pricing mercilessly bashed prior to launch?

    • 0 avatar
      holydonut

      Here is the TTAC review for the Crosstour.

      http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/review-2010-honda-crosstour/

      There wasn’t a single comment that the base vehicle FWD configuration is too expensive.

  • avatar
    sfdennis1

    Haven’t seen it mentioned yet in this post that the new Grand Cherokee is supposedly based heavily on the Mercedes ML mid-size SUV.

    If they have spent some money making the interior decent, and the new V6 is smooth/powerful enough (we already know that the optional Hemi is the shiznit)…then, like the 300C at it’s introduction, this could be like getting a Mercedes with a $10K-15K discount attached.

    Doesn’t sound like such a bad deal to me…

  • avatar
    joe_thousandaire

    So only the Overland trim is going to get the much-hyped air suspension? Chrysler, I am disappoint.

  • avatar
    Cerum

    Any word on the SRT trim level?

  • avatar
    Tommy Boy

    I really want to like it. But its development, presumably commenced under Daimler and consummated under Cerebus, scares me — it seems inevitable that the powers in control forced the engineers to hit “cost targets” that compromise quality and (in particular) long-term durability (i.e., post-warranty longevity of components).

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    Jeep 1, Saab 0!

  • avatar
    rpol35

    Does it come with silk underwear? I guess there is the heart of a Jeep in there somewhere…..

  • avatar
    YellowDuck

    errr…is this V6 the new Pentastar or not?????

  • avatar
    iNeon

    In 1997, my parents paid $22,999.xx for a Grand Cherokee Laredo. A fantastic vehicle that needed a single service in 70k miles. A friend just finished-off a 200k mile example that would have gone another 100k in my hands. This price isn’t at all out-of-line for a 6Cylinder RWD wagon, and they promise to get carlike* economy numbers with the new Phoenix engines, sweetening the pot. Aren’t they supposed to be more powerful, as well?

    The Alfa version of this automobile is the one to watch. I cannot at all understand the venom being spewed toward this vehicle/platform. The Grand Cherokee is Chrysler’s ‘old reliable’– and apart from money– was the reason Daimler courted dear Chrysler. They needed a lot of help with that Alabama car. Modernizing in general, actually.

    *Chrysler-owning-simpleton-math: 20 Percent of 20 is 4. 21(actual economy number)plus 4, is 25. My PT manual only gets 30. Not bad for 100 more horsepower and a lot more room. Suppose the added luxury is just icing.


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