By on March 31, 2010

The AP [via canadianbusiness.com] reports that two separate bills to make the Corvette Kentucky’s official state car appear to be dead in the state’s legislature. State Rep. C.B. Embry Jr., R-Morgantown, suggests that the failure of these bills would be perceived as a snub by GM, who builds Corvettes in Bowling Green. Not so, say GM reps.

With or without a bill, the Corvette is an iconic American sports car, and we’re proud to build it in Kentucky. It shouldn’t be perceived as a snub, and we don’t take it as that.

But GM’s downplaying of the news hides the possible cause for what otherwise would be a win-win political proposition.

The first indication that something is afoot comes from state House Democratic whip John Will Stacy, who refuses to explain why the bills died, saying only:

Sometimes things happen that no one has a good explanation for. And this may be one of those times.

Meanwhile, there are real clues to why Kentucky snubbed GM. A bill recently passed, giving culled GM dealers the right of first refusal to any new dealership franchises in their former areas. That bill is still waiting on a signature from the governor. Some 38 Kentucky dealers have been culled since GM exited bankruptcy, and having tooled up a presence in the state legislature for a reinstatement bill, it’s likely that these culled dealers have convinced lawmakers that now is not the best time to be rewarding GM with Corvette kudos. Given that GM has reinstated over a quarter of its culled Kentucky dealers, this is just more evidence that GM’s dealer cull made more enemies than it did fundamentally change the company’s retail situation.

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6 Comments on “Who Killed The Corvette’s Chances Of Being Kentucky’s Official Car?...”


  • avatar
    educatordan

    Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhh… Low blow, that’s got to hurt. There’s two questions I’ve always wondered about since I was a little Corvette fan. How was the decision made to move production from St. Louis to Kentucky? If you wanted to roll the dice on a used Corvette, which year/generation is the best in overall build quality? It seemed to me like GM from the 60s on always tried harder on the ‘vette than anything else.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    Why does Kentucky need an official state car?

    Besides, in 5-10 years it’s conceivable that GM will be C7 (pun intended), and “Corvette” will be spun off as a Chinese brand, finally with a mid-engine layout. Heh.

    Then Kentucky would be in the position of ‘de-friending’ Corvette.

    No, they never should have taken up the measure.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    Kentucky Truck Plant – builds light/heavy duty Ford trucks and SUVs, employs 5,154.
    Louisville Assembly Plant – builds SUVs and upcoming Kuga, employs 2,000.
    Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky – builds mid/full size sedans/CUVs, employs 7000
    Corvette Assembly – builds Vette, employs 477.

    That seems like around 14,000 good reasons the Vette shouldn’t be Kentucky’s “official car”.

    My opinion is that idiots bringing bills like this to the legislature should be booted out. Waste of taxpayer time and money for something idiotic.

  • avatar
    Steven02

    Why should Kentucky have an official car? It makes little sense. I agree with the post that idiots who bring bills like this forward should be removed. No reason to waste time with BS legislation that makes people feel good but doesn’t actually do anything.

  • avatar

    Having a state car seems like that spot was bought off. Especially since there are two other car companies who employ far more people in their plants. And in all honesty, whats the point in having official state anything (minus flags)?


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