By on February 4, 2010

We can get ourselves in a tizzy about the defects and quality issues in new cars, but it’s sometimes good to have a little perspective. How would like to try to keep this Maserati Quattroporte stretch limo running? No e-pedals on this baby, but look at that bank of Webers to keep tuned and synchronized.

The big Maserati four-cam V8 had its origins in racing cars, like this 450S that Carrol Shelby once raced. I doubt its designers expected it to end up in a limo, and in Eugene, at that. It’s a small world after all.

The big (non-stretched) Maserati sedan was quite a piece of work in its day. Designed by Maestro Giorgetto Giugiario, it graced us with its handsome angularity from 1976 through 1990. These were quite common in LA back in the day, a more exclusive alternative to the big Mercedes sedans. The interiors were a true delight. Smog controls made life hard for the 4.2 and the later 4.9 liter V8, but it gave a passing account of itself. This one looks like it might be out of commission for a while.

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15 Comments on “Curbside Classic Outtake: Reliabity Is Always Relative...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    Is it for sale?

  • avatar
    Ernie

    Paul, you have FOUND my weakness. My wife is stuck on badges (*I* don’t need no steenkin badges) — she’s fixated on one day driving a BMW, Audi, Mercedes or Rolls Royce . . . myself? Not so much so.

    Every time I see a Maserati, I go a bit weak in the knees (the Panamera Turbo comes a close second).

    I hope to one day be GIVEN one . . . and be able to afford the repairs on said machine :o

    Never liked limos, but this, I like. Thanks Paul.

  • avatar
    kkt

    A stretched Maserati? I think that’s the only capital offense still on the books in Italy.

  • avatar

    that thing musta got lost tryin’ to git to Vegas. It surely don’t belong in Eugene?

  • avatar
    Mullholland

    I’ve always enjoyed your photos and stories. Your series always creates lots of interest and nostalgia for me. But you’ve outdone yourself this time. I’ve never made a request but is there anyway to get some photos posted of the interior of that unique and magnificent Italian?

  • avatar
    naugahyde

    Why not just drop a chevy 350 in there?

    • 0 avatar
      pgcooldad

      My thoughts exactly. Some entrepreneur type can rescue this beauty, swap in a more reliable and easy to service motor, clean it all up, some fresh paint and you got yourself a unique Limo business.

    • 0 avatar
      madcynic

      Why would you want to do that? You don’t change the engine on a classic, the whole point of a classic car is a complete one. If you need a different engine, buy a replica kit – of course, there might not be one for this beauty…

  • avatar
    Mullholland

    I’ve always enjoyed your photos and stories. Your series always creates lots of interest and nostalgia for me. But you’ve outdone yourself this time.
    Your comments about the Quattroporte’s interior are spot on. And because of that I have one request: Is there anyway to get some photos posted of the interior of that unique and magnificent Italian?

  • avatar
    eastcoastcar

    Well with this car label, it was understood that it was high maintenance. We all can name other cars that require continual tweaking to stay on the road, and we all know that unless kept up with, which cars become impossible to keep eventually. Toyota cars were believed to be bullet proof. I remember 10 years ago seeing a documentary on one of the TV channels about the Taliban—and noticed that their fighters were using Toyota pickups, and I thought ‘ok, if those trucks work for the Taliban—with that climate and lack of maintenance, surely one would haul me around America.’ Maybe not so much these days. Who needs electronics and plastic where metal should be?

  • avatar
    TR4

    Why the perceived difficulty of synchronizing carburetors? Any halfway competent mechanic can do it with the aid of an air flow meter (like the Uni-Syn) and if you really know what you’re doing a length of hose (to listen to the air flow) will suffice.

  • avatar
    AccAzda

    WOW..

    Seeing a Maser Limo..in pics must be nice.


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