By on January 8, 2010

(courtesy:90percentofeverything.com)

British officials are making plans to impose a tax on speeding and parking citations this year in an effort to raise money to cover a growing budget deficit. Secretary of State for Justice Claire Ward announced the plan in a written answer to a question posed by Member of Parliament Greg Knight. The new revenue would be labeled as a “victims’ surcharge.”

“It is Government policy that, where possible, offenders should contribute to victims’ services as part of their reparation. Provisions were therefore included in the Domestic Violence, Crime and Victims Act 2004 providing for a surcharge to be payable on criminal convictions, penalty notices for disorder and on fixed penalty notices for road traffic offenses where the offenses are persistent and serious,” Ward said. “We intend to add the surcharge to other disposals as soon as it becomes feasible to do so.”

The tax, which currently stands at £15 (US $24), would be imposed on all forms of speeding and parking tickets. Given that there were 1,462,235 speed camera citations issued in 2007, the plan would generate an extra £21,933,525 (US $35,020,571) from the increase in the cost of a ticket from £60 (US $96) to £75 ($120). Expanding the fee to cover parking tickets and other non-moving violations would more than double that figure.

The victims’ surcharge was first created in April 2007 as a means of forcing violent criminals to compensate their victims. The fee would now be imposed on motorists whose technical violations — overstaying at a parking meter, forgetting to wear a seatbelt or driving a few MPH over the limit — have no victims.

The UK move follows a global trend. Last week, Georgia became the latest US state to turn toward speeding ticket surcharges as a means of balancing the budget. Michigan, New Jersey, New York and Texas have similar programs.

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13 Comments on “UK to Impose Tax on Speeding and Parking Tickets...”


  • avatar
    Contrarian

    Many US states are already taxing tickets. It’s getting very expensive to speed.

  • avatar

    I guess calling it the “Baby Puncher” tax isn’t PC enough. 
    I would like to have the job of coming up with names for these various “charges” attached to different things.

  • avatar
    criminalenterprise

    Why not tax the tax on the speeding ticket too?

  • avatar
    jkross22

    I wonder if by calling it a tax and not a fee that it will become a permanent fixture.  Here in the republic of Kalifornia, that’s how we roll.  Of course, fee increases have a nasty habit of not being reduced unless a governor runs on that as a main campaign issue.

  • avatar
    rocketrodeo

    Victim’s surcharge is right.

  • avatar
    seschub

    As if most municipalities don’t already use speeding tickets as a form of taxation.

  • avatar
    dolo54

    I got hit with the $300 NY state one for speeding a few years ago. $300 over 3 years for having a few points on your license. These kind of taxes are easier to pass I guess.

  • avatar
    N8iveVA

    well the UK is the #1 Nanny State.  Not that we’re THAT far behind.

  • avatar
    Mr Carpenter

    In Britain, apparently, they do tax taxes. 

    Do new cars still get a 10% “Car Tax” which is added to the price after which the 17.5% VAT (value added tax) is added?  That’s a tax on a tax. 

    Or have Labour increased the new “Car Tax” to higher than 10%?  Or does it relate to CO2 now?  (I know the annual tax disc relates to CO2 output).

    BTW, since “global warming” has been totally and entirely debunked for anyone with two brain cells to rub together, when (or “will”) the global governments stop taxing it and regulating it?

    Oh silly me, that’d be COMMON SENSE.  Can’t have that, now, can we? 

  • avatar
    Robert Schwartz

    Adding insult to injury.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    Here, the offender is the greedy government and the victims who should be compensated are those being taxed.
     
    It’s not true that every branch of government is inventing new ways to raise money. In our state, the governor and legislature got together and cut expenses to match the available income. On the other hand, in our city, the mayor suggests raising taxes every time a city department goes over budget.

  • avatar
    bmoredlj

    Let this be a lesson to all of us: Don’t own a car, anywhere, ever.

    • 0 avatar

      I believe that’s the whole objective: get rid of the ability of spontaneous travel while encouraging scheduled, monitored and easily controlled public transport as an alternative.
      Oh, and I got some tin foil sitting on the table.  Any ideas for a cool hat design?


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