By on December 25, 2009

Saab 96

I hate Christmas shopping. So when we walked down to the Holiday Market at the Lane Events Center, I told Stephanie I’d meander around the parking lot while she went inside to grab something. Forty-five minutes later, she had two presents and I had bagged eighty cars. This event runs weekends and a few extra days from Thanksgiving to Christmas Eve, for exactly twelve days. So this is one short slice of one-twelfth of the potential Curbside Classics at the Holiday Market.

Each car’s identity pops up when the cursor touches the picture. Test yourself, and write down how many cars you got, or didn’t. There was one bike in the lot, and of course, it was a CC too! All eighty after the jump:

Update: I can’t get the identifying caption to not come up below each picture when it is clicked on to enlarge. If you really want to test yourself, put up a Post-It on the screen just below the picture. Sorry.

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41 Comments on “Curbside Classic Holiday Concours And Contest: Identify The Eighty Parking Lot Curbside Classics...”


  • avatar
    V6

    i’m enjoying checking out all these pictures, however the only annoying thing is there is no “next picture” button, and every new picture requires the whole page to reload which is very time consuming when there’s 80 pictures! :)

    • 0 avatar
      H Man

      Slide shows suck, but inflate the page-hits.
      Paul makes more money that way.  :D

      Fun post though. I held my hand up to block
      the titles; just don’t stare at the white pic square
      as it loads, you’ll see the picture title.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Sorry; our set up is not conducive to big slide shows. I just couldn’t resist. Making money on this?? I wish :)

  • avatar
    Russycle

    Wow, what a Xmas present, 80 curbside classics!  Haven’t thought about about the Nissan Stanza for years, my wife had the wagon/van version when I met her.  I used to drive a 2WD version of the 4WD Toyota van pictured.  It was fun to drive, pretty fast for a little four banger, but it ate automatic transmissions like candy.

    Spotted another 80s beauty I’d forgotten about on I-5 south of Portland today:  Toyota Corolla FX16.  Any of those still roaming the streets of Eugene?

  • avatar

    1.  I wouldn’t consider that Taurus a CC.  They’re everywhere, at least in Ohio, besides that’s a ’94-’95 or so (how do I know, I have a wagon with that front end, in that color).  It would be rare if it were an intact original ’86-88.  I remember the Glenmoor Fine Gathering of cars COULD NOT find an intact, showable 1st gen Taurus, a year or two back.  They had a press release, it was covered in at least the local papers, that they were begging for one for the show since they had the designer as the Guest of Honor.
    2.  I absolutely LOVE how the BMW is parked, on the end, where the painted lines scream: NO PARKING!
    3. It wasn’t really all that hard to middle click on each thumbnail to load a bunch of pages to view them individually in Firefox.  I guess if you were on Dialup or Satellite Internet it would suck, but I’m on the “economy” internet in Rural Ohio, and get 1Mb/s, so it was fine.
    4. Merry Christmas!  Thanks for the gift, sorry I didn’t get you anything.

  • avatar
    shaker

    Yes, I know that it’s a “public place”, but aren’t you the least bit uneasy about posting these photos without blanking out the license numbers?
     

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      No; why?

    • 0 avatar
      john.fritz

      I have the same question. What liability do you believe Paul is exposing himself to by posting pictures of cars in a public parking lot? There is no expectation of privacy when you’re out there in there in the big big world. I do not understand why people are so sensitive to things like this.

    • 0 avatar
      H Man

      This is very common on Craigslist.  People have no reservations putting their phone numbers, names, email, physical addresses in ads, but will blank out the license plate on the car.  I have absolutely no idea why anyone does this.  A scam I haven’t heard of?

    • 0 avatar
      shaker

      Paul – The Law of Unintended Consequences. Maybe a Private Investigator could use the knowledge in a published photo that he wouldn’t have otherwise. Granted, these cars are unusual enough that maybe the license info would be redundant, but that info being there would make it more likely to stand up in court.
      I work in the medical device industry – I have to think that way.

  • avatar
    cnyguy

    Why no F-150?

  • avatar

    because people in Eugene don’t drive FISOs. Just like people in Cambridge don’t drive FISOs.
    Paul, how does a new fangled golf kart on steroids (the Zap) rate classic status? A real zebra would laugh at that thing, and maybe step on it

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      I’ve said it many times: Curbside Classics is a big tent. Anything worth looking at, even momentarily, is a CC.

    • 0 avatar
      Oregon Sage

      Actually Eugene has plenty of F150s, including a vintage unit that Paul drives (actually pre 150) and my ’08 SuperCrew.  The facility where he took the pictures is what is commonly known as the Fairgrounds and is also home to an ice rink where they play hockey, roller derby events, car shows, RV shows, dog and horse shows, and the county fair.  At any time there are a significant percentage of ‘trucks’ in that parking lot.  Cambridge it aint. Eugene barely qualifies as a metropolitan ‘city’ and is surrounded by farms, forests, and other such environments where trucks are the standard issue transportation device. Lumber, agricultural, fishing and similar interests are well represented here.  If you want a more cosmopolitan environment you have to go to Portland (or some would say SF or Seattle).

    • 0 avatar
      cnyguy

      I’m assuming you mean the People’s Republic of Cambridge (I have family there) where no one  drives a F-150 because a) they aren’t  ‘cool’ and b) very few natives have the skills to parallel park anything bigger than a Kia Rio.

  • avatar
    Mungooz

    I must be a bit looney because I got so many of them right, quite a few from the thumbnail.  But that Zap Zebra stopped me dead in my tracks.

  • avatar
    MadHungarian

    A Colt wagon?  A first gen Camry?  And all the other Japanese iron more than two decades old.  I’m flabbergasted.  In just about any other part of the country (including the snow free Deep South) they have all oxidized away years ago.  Even in the desert they are gone, because 20 years of sun reduced the interiors to plastic dust.

    • 0 avatar
      Oregon Sage

      We dont salt the roads here, and it rarely snows/ices up  in Eugene.  Cars on the coast, which is 60 miles away, do suffer attack by the salt air.  Japanese cars caught on early on the west coast, and many of them have survived quite well.

    • 0 avatar
      fincar1

      Yes, non-coastal Pacific Northwest areas have some of the best old-car climates going. More water damage of course than drier areas, but less sunburn. And in general no or few occasions to salt the roads.
      I wonder what that fastback coupe is that’s way in the background behind the white Audi Quattro wagon.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      Audi TT

  • avatar

    My father has a toaster tank R75 just like that one. His even came with the hideous windjammer style barn door (thankfully he pitched it).

  • avatar
    MBella

    I loved this. So many of these cars made me smile, including the B3 Passat that is exactly like the one I used to own.

  • avatar
    john.fritz

    That poor guy with the blue Saab is gonna be pissed when he discovers the big white crease in his curb-side door compliments of that F350 parked next to him.

  • avatar
    Toyondai92

    Wow, two G1 Acura Legends in the same parking lot. A lot of those around here were sacrificed to the Prius gods during C4C, nice to know some people besides enthusiasts still run them.

  • avatar
    aamj50

    Pontiac Sunfire? Maybe it’s a midwest thing, but if you pull in to any high school parking lot and throw a rock chances are you’ll hit a Sunfire or Cavalier convertible. Is it in there because Pontiac is dead brand walking?

  • avatar
    CyCarConsulting

    I got them all right. 78 shit boxes and one BMW R75

  • avatar
    Andy D

    Looks to be a late model, post 67 Saab, the ones with the 4 stroke V4. I have been driving a CC since ’96 when I bought my first 528e. I also used to have a Datsun PU. And 20 yrs of 6volt bugs. Keep up the fine work, Paul. I have only mild curiosity about new cars and future developments. I’m stuck in the 80s with the best DDs I’ve ever had.

  • avatar

    that’s a humongous tent. I think you should do a list of what falls outside of that tent. Starting maybe with a cobalt. And any camry from the beginning of the 90s on. most mitsus. any nissan sentra and probably any altima. Kia rio.

  • avatar
    TAP

    his was my first car!  A ‘66 with the 850cc 3 cyl. 2 stroke- Monte Carlo version, which had 3- 1bbl carbs. Also had a 4 speed on the tree that shifted well, and a oil reservoir good for 1000 miles. This car easily out-accelerated V-dubs, and had wonderfully direct steering. It really stuck to the road, even with bias-ply tires!
    Another unique feature was free-wheeling, which dropped rpms to idle when off the gas-down hills- then re-engaged when stepping on gas.
    When the motor finally seized up while going 30mph, there was just wind noise, as the car kept going because the free-wheel disengaged the engine.   To this day, I can’t stand wind noise in a car.

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    Must have been pretty good weather to have an R75 in the lot.  But I’m surprised to see anyone daring to go forth in a Zap Zebra.  It made me wonder if you were working alphabetically too, in as much as there’s a clean X1/9 that appears to be still getting around under its own power; and a nice XJ8.  The Zephyr appears to have been well cared for too.  But I think my overall favorite is the 1970 Impala,  now thats what I’d call a curbside classic.

    We should thank Paul for having a big tent, think of how many C-C’s you can buy for the price of one Hemmings classic?

  • avatar

    I vote with Panzerfaust for the ’70 Impala, although I think that Saab is a close second.
    As for the ZZ, a few people will go forth in anything. I saw some sort of 3 wheeled electric vehicle with kind of a lean to top open on 3 sides, at tires of mountain bike thickness, but about 20″ diameter wheels at a TRader Joe’s in my neighboring Arlington MA. Makes a Smart look like a Caddie

    • 0 avatar
      panzerfaust

      Since we’re talking about the classics, which version of the Xebra is it, the fiberglass one with the ill fitting panels, or the tin bodied insta-rust version? 

      I see that Zap has another candidate for the vaporware of the year award; its called of all things the ‘Alias.’  Why do I get the impression that the folks running Zap’s office in the Cayman Islands came up with that name?  Guess they have a sense of humor. 

  • avatar

    Very cool parking lot. Love the Colt wagon. That white LeBaron is a 1986.

  • avatar
    dolorean23

    Very interesting to see all the Tercel wagons, which I assume were complete with the on-the-fly 4WD option. Still, no Merkurs in there? No Mustang II’s?

    • 0 avatar
      Oregon Sage

      There used to be an XR4Ti Merkur parked a few blocks from my house on the north edge of Eugene, but it disappeared a few months ago.  It was the white, early, double wing, no straight lines version.  I owned one just like it in Phoenix back in the day. My young son referred to it as the car-with-wings.  When it started to blow out the AC system and then the Auto Trans I began to refer to it as the ‘exploding Merkur’.  After a few months of pain I traded it for a Subaru.
      A memorable event with this car occurred as I was parking in Sedona one day just as a busload of European tourists debarked from a bus.  Upon spotting the Merkur a couple of them exclaimed something to the effect that it was a bit different looking Sierra… to which I had to explain that in the US a Sierra was a Chevy pickup, hence the Merkur name and the Turbo T-Bird engine. To them it was a surprise bit of the old country in the middle of the Arizona mountains.

  • avatar
    nikita

    Wow.  Ive owned a few of them over the years.
    ’71 C-10
    ’73 BMW R bike
    ’72 “Bay Window” VW bus
    ’84 Toyota 4×4 pickup
    ’68 VW bug
     

  • avatar
    tech98

    Wow, a Fiat/Bertone X1/9. Between rust and mechanical failure that has to be a rare bird. I haven’t seen one of those in two decades.


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