By on October 26, 2009

Remember the scene in Jaws when Quint is being eaten by a great white shark, where he kicks his legs at the beast’s head, trying to avoid its endless rows of razor-sharp teeth? I reckon Lincoln’s designers based the MKT’s snout on Bruce’s man-eating maw. Sure, there’s a touch of Hannibal Lecter’s mask to the MKT’s grill design. And yes, HR Giger’s aliens would feel right at home wheeling this whip to a Humanity’s End party. But there are children who laughed at the liver-loving psycho killer and sniggered at the acid-tongued incubus who will wake-up in the middle of the night in a cold sweat, begging Daddy to take them to school in the morning in his sedate sedan. Congratulations, Lincoln: the MKT is the world’s most terrifying family vehicle.

The MKT’s grill is so unrelentingly grotesque it’s easy to overlook the fact that the crossover’s hind quarters are equally—if less aggressively—hideous. For anyone who appreciates well-sculpted sheet metal and artful illumination, the MKT’s butt is an abomination. The enormous red strip bisecting the back end at nipple height is a distorted echo of an over-sized Ford Thunderbird logo pasted onto an homage to the Acura RL’s ungainly reverse snow plow motif. Adding insult to aesthetic injury, the MKT’s back-up lights are in exactly the wrong place (dead center).

But wait! There’s more! The rear’s glass-to-metal ratio and forward tilt suggests nothing so much as an oncoming Amtrak train. You can’t ask the MKT’s designers “what the hell were you thinking?” because, clearly, they weren’t. The MKT’s profile is blessedly bland, if you discount the 10-spoke 20″ EcoBling wagon wheels filling-up the arches and ruining the ride. We’ll get to that . . .

Based on its looks, the only logical market for Lincoln’s unfathomably ugly station wagon is someone driving a Like the MKZ...only better!hearse. Unfortunately, the $50K plus sticker puts it out of reach for all but the most successful goth rockers, who’d instantly opt for a proper tour bus. Which leaves . . . who? Seriously. I have no idea why anyone would buy a Lincoln MKT. An engine freak?

Lincoln proudly proclaims that the EcoBoosted MKT is the “only vehicle in its class with a twin-turbocharged direct injection V6 engine.” There’s a reason for that. Vehicles in this genre (at this price point) are tuned for quiet composure. Unlike a smooth-spinning naturally-aspirated six or a lazy, loping V8, the EcoBoosted 3.5-liter V6 is a thoroughly manic motor. The MKT’s force-fed mill feels like an amphetamine-crazed stallion, ready to drop a couple of cogs and bolt for the horizon at a moment’s notice. Or, indeed, without a moment’s notice.

Never mind the occasional roller coaster-like jolt, when the MKT’s speed-seeking six-speed gearbox loses its [freight] train of thought. Or the fact that the MKT’s paddle shift transmission gave up the ghost in the middle of my test drive. With 350 lb•ft of torque at just 3500 RPM, the MKT accelerates like its hair’s on fire. How great is that?

Not much. The the carnivorous Lincoln’s an answer to a question nobody asked: where can I buy a really fast Medusa-class crossover with a hair-trigger throttle? Oh, and don’t worry about wind noise, tire roar or a stiff, crashy ride. Or handling.

Sensibly enough, Lincoln equips its blown MKTs with all wheel-drive. While the big rig’s brakes are almost as touchy as the go-pedal, the steering system serves-up something roughly approximating feel and the car corners without excessive body roll. To no appreciable effect save safety. Tap into the MKT’s seemingly endless thrust (just try not to) and its forward momentum completely outstrips the Lincoln’s ability to do anything about/with it. The MKT is more Hyundai than hot rod; it’s Sonata sports wagon it Hertz.

Yes, there is that. The MKT’s materials, interior design and overall build quality suggests a future spent scaring jet-lagged travelers trudging through rental car lots. What the hell are those pieces of foam glued to the top of the engine bay (in front of the base of the windscreen)? My guess: a twenty-five cent fix for an at-speed hood rattle. Got duct tape? Yup. Well we may need some more over here . . .

As an automotive brand struggling to reclaim its place in The Bigs, Lincoln has equipped all MKTs with “premium perforated leather trimmed seats.” While the chairs are comfortable enough for government work, they’re as aromatic as a window pane. Without any eau de dead cow to distract the nasal palate from nasty, out-gassing plastics, Lincoln’s luxury crossover smells exactly like an oven-fresh Ford Focus.

It’s no small point. Lincoln owes its miserable existence to its inability to sweat the small stuff. Everywhere you look, there’s evidence of cost cutting. From the glove box lid’s flimsy feel, to the execrable embalmed mouse fur material covering the third row seats, to the nasty faux nickel-finished plastic adorning (in the ironic sense) the radio and HVAC housing, the MKT is more econo-box than luxury limo.

I know luxury cars. And you, sir, are no luxury car.

The MKT’s central dials are an especially egregious example of Ford’s lack of commitment to, or understanding of, an upmarket ethos. Garish markers illuminate an otherwise vapid tachometer and frame the speedometer in twenty mile-per-hour increments. [Note: if Lincoln wants buyers younger than 60, perhaps they shouldn’t put that number smack dab in the middle of the speedo.] I’m thinking the MKT’s vanilla-ice-cream-topped-with-gravy styling owes its genesis to a penny-pinching rummage through Ford’s parts bin. If so, shame on them. If not, double shame on them.

The MKT’s plastics may smell bad, but they engender the same amount of haptic happiness as any other Ford product (i.e., none). About the best that can be said about the MKT’s cabin: the wood’s shiny and the second row seating is expansive, cosseting and comfortable—provided the owner opted for twin chairs (as advertised on TV).

Hang on; why would they do that? Who wants an ugly-ass six-chair leather-lined station-wagon-on-stilts? How’s that whole R-Class thing working out for Mercedes, anyway? True story: the moribund Merc enjoys pride of place on the Lincoln’s Compar-O-Matic, flanked on either side the not-exactly-flying-off-the-shelves Audi Q7 3.6 and the not-entirely-unpopular Acura MDX.

Yes, well, as well all know, three’s company and six is a crowd. And there are not one but two more 5000 lb gorillas in or near the MKT’s vicinity. I know Lincoln’s nonsensiclature makes it virtually impossible to memorize their lineup, but I seem to recall that they already have a crossover. The MK . . . uh . . . X. Trying to create a market for the MKT—instead of improving and promoting their existing model—is yet more evidence of Ford’s ongoing wander through the wilderness.

Anyway, primate number two: the Ford Flex. The twin-under-the-skin Flex is no oil painting either, but it costs less, does everything the Lincoln MKT does, and wasn’t designed by a psychopath serving a life sentence in a maximum security mental health facility.

Time to face facts: the MKT’s fugly grill and bulbous butt are an insurmountable obstacle. The EcoBoosted Lincoln could be as fast and agile as an Mercedes S63 AMG, as luxurious as a Bentley Flying Spur and as economical as a Toyota Prius and you’d still need to a brace of beta blockers to buy one.

I know Lincoln dealerships treat their customers well, if only because of their scarcity. But anyone who buys an MKT instead of an up-optioned Flex or something else entirely is an idiot. Actually, make that a blind idiot.

As even the Rhode Island Department of Motor Vehicles’ licensing division has to draw the line somewhere, I don’t expect the Lincoln MKT will do much for Lincoln’s bottom line or future prospects, save weaken them. The Lincoln MKT AWD EcoBoost proves, once again, that just because you can do something doesn’t mean you should.

Performance: 5 stars. Anyone who’d want more thrust in this thing ought to have their headers examined.

Ride: 2 stars. If it was an SUV, fair enough. But it isn’t, so no fare.

Handling: 3 stars. Deadly dull but not deadly.

Exterior: 0 stars. Ghastly.

Interior: 0 stars. What we have is a failure to luxuriate.

Fit and Finish: 1 star. Nothing broke or fell off during the test drive, but Lincoln needs to reach higher. MUCH higher.

Toys: 4 stars. It honest-to-God parks itself and the SYNC works a treat, but the ICE audio quality is so muddy I wanted to put a pair of Wellingtons over my ears.

Desirability: 0 stars. I can’t imagine anyone pining to plunk down 50 large on one of these things.

Price as tested: $50K

Overall Rating: 0 stars. Beats walking and goes like stink, but the MKT is a complete embarrassment to all concerned, really. A badly built car that never should have been built.

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118 Comments on “Review: 2010 Lincoln MKT EcoBoost...”


  • avatar
    SLLTTAC

    So, Mr Farago, what did you really think of the MKT?

  • avatar

    I drove the non-EcoBoost front-drive MKT recently. Enough power for this sort of vehicle, but the engine sounded coarse and the nose got floaty under hard acceleration.

    The standard model uses a different, hydraulic (rather than electric) steering system, and it’s numb. The handling felt a bit soggy, yet the ride also wasn’t very good. Some harsh reactions to bumps, and the stiffness of the body structure clearly isn’t up to luxury car standards.

    Some of the interior materials are worthy of the price, others are not. Interior space could be a larger issue. In most three-row vehicles, even small ones, adults will fit in the rearmost seat in a pinch. Not in this one–there’s not enough headroom.

    Overall, I can’t see the point of buying one of these instead of the roomier, less expensive, easier on the eyes Flex.

    No reliability stats for the MKT yet. The related MKS and Flex have been about average based on responses to TrueDelta’s Car Reliability Survey.

    http://www.truedelta.com/car-reliability.php

  • avatar
    TEXN3

    What a disappointing vehicle…this is not what Lincoln needs, or Ford for that matter, to compete. Should have kept the Aviator around and dumped the Mountaineer. It was a better 7-seat midsize Lincoln than either the MKX or MKT. And was built how a Lincoln should be, body on frame with all independent suspension and a decent V8.

  • avatar

    This is sad. They could have built that Lincoln concept car that I think it was you who showed us, and instead they build a car with a face that even a mother shark couldn’t love. This car is not as bad as a Caliber, but that’s damning with very faint praise. That grill is going to look absolutely junky as soon as the car is a year old, or gets its first ding. The face on this thing is worthy of a fifth grader’s doodle.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I was wondering where this review went. I’ll be in the MKT for a car like this next year when my XC90 lease expires. I definitely won’t be shopping this one! I’ll stop at my local Lincoln dealer to have a look, though. I would most definitely consider a Flex over this.

    I sent pics of the MKT to my wife a month ago and here was her response (we have twins on the way): “I know we’ll be mourning the passing of our personal freedom, but do I really need to drive something that looks like a hearse? They purposely give all those in motion action shots so you can’t get a good look at that honkin’ beast.”

  • avatar
    lawmonkey

    Black doesn’t do this car’s exterior any favors. At least this car will never, ever get lost in a parking lot. While I don’t actually hate this vehicle (maybe next revision, if it exists, could take the decent underpinnings and push it in the right direction), I question who would actually buy it in its current state – my grandparents might like the idea of a unique American vehicle that can haul the occasional visiting family member around, but I could never ever see them using the self park, sync, or anything like that. I definitely can’t see them paying for that stuff.

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    Am I wrong, or did they take the front grille treatment of the old Pontiac Montana, super-size it and slap it on the front of this abomination….

    How low-rent can you go…..

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    I’ve seen a few of these at Ford dealers. The Flex, if nothing else, is interesting and cohesive in it’s design. This, well, I’m reminded of the current Lexus RX or BMW X6 (or the Aztek): taking design cues that work on one body style (a sedan or coupe) and extrapolating them onto one where they very much don’t.

    This really is a very ugly car, even disregarding the grille. Where the Flex is clean and striking, the MKT is cetacean in it’s profile. I thought the Traverse was bad, but this really takes it.

  • avatar

    Forgot to mention: when I dropped by the dealer, they had a loaded EcoBoost awaiting delivery to…Geoffrey Fieger. You might know him as Jack Kevorkian’s defense attourney:

    http://www.fiegerlaw.com/landmark.php

    Somehow failed to make the hearse connection at the time.

  • avatar
    Lumbergh21

    Ignoring grammar and missing words, I don’t think you were quite harsh enough on the MKT’s appearance. I think we have a new challenger to the Aztek for the ugliest car in America. The Aztec was ugly in a disjointed Frankenstein’s monster manner, but at least Frankenstein’s monster had a relatively good heart. The MKT is plain frightening. This car takes the new Acura hideousness to higher levels. I can’t imagine what the discussions were like when they were designing the exterior and came up with this monstrosity. How anyone could thnk this exterior would be appealing to anyone is beyond me. This is a car aimed at blind drivers searching for a “luxury” CUV, and that’s a really small niche market to be aiming at. On the plus side, I don’t expect sales numbers to justify its existence for very long; so, we won’t have to put up with seeing them on the road very much.

  • avatar
    relton

    Actually, I see those little glued-on foam blocks as an encouraging sign that Ford is at least attempting to address some refinement issues. Back when I worked there, they would have let the hood rattle rather than spend 23 cents on a solution, however crude.

    It’s also possible that only the press cars get these, and the regular cars just have the hood rattle.

    Bob

  • avatar
    fincar1

    Aztek, your position at the top of the ugly list is in serious jeopardy.

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    “I reckon Lincoln’s designers based the MKT’s snout on Bruce’s man-eating maw. ”

    The original Jaws, with all its total lack of reality about how sharks behave and all that, is still one of my favorite movies. And despite my 21 years now of long-distance ocean (coastal) deepwater swimming.

    The MK’s snout, though, does not look at all like a great white’s mouth, but much more than a harmless baleen whale’s.

  • avatar
    97escort

    Perhaps buyers of the MKT are into intimidation. If so the car’s styling is wildly successful.

    What better intimidation than to look in the rear view mirror and see that front end? And that ugly butt is like a fart when it passes you.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    elton :
    October 26th, 2009 at 12:14 pm

    Actually, I see those little glued-on foam blocks as an encouraging sign that Ford is at least attempting to address some refinement issues. Back when I worked there, they would have let the hood rattle rather than spend 23 cents on a solution, however crude.

    Yeah, but I think his point – which is well-taken – is that glued-on foam blocks are not acceptable on a car at this price point. They’d pass muster on a Focus, but I think buyers of $60,000 luxury cars demand better.

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    “Overall Rating: 0 stars. Beats walking and goes like stink, but the MKT is a complete embarrassment to all concerned, really. A badly built car that never should have been built.”

    I agree. Damning but well deserved criticism is probably what Lincoln needs, and if they pay attention and try to do MUCH better, maybe this will actually help them much more than a puff piece saying that there are enough taste-less auto illiterates out there that actually like this POS and will buy it.

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    “Overall, I can’t see the point of buying one of these instead of the roomier, less expensive, easier on the eyes Flex.”

    Why stay with Ford and not buy the far superior, far more competent, car-like Honda Odyssey?

  • avatar
    Geo. Levecque

    Right at this minute the Ford plant who makes all these fine vehicles in Oakville Ontario is shut down due to transmission parts from India unavailable, now you know what could happen to there Transmissions in future eh?

  • avatar
    fincar1

    Lumbergh21, you aced me out with your comment re the Aztek.

    I just showed the photos above to my wife, who was similarly impressed with the looks of this car. I suppose the fact that it is showing up around Halloween might partly explain the Jack O’Lantern grille.

  • avatar
    BDB

    Why stay with Ford and not buy the far superior, far more competent, car-like Honda Odyssey?

    Maybe because the Odysssey is automotive Ambien?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Autosavant :
    October 26th, 2009 at 12:22 pm

    “Overall, I can’t see the point of buying one of these instead of the roomier, less expensive, easier on the eyes Flex.”

    Why stay with Ford and not buy the far superior, far more competent, car-like Honda Odyssey?

    Or a Buick Enclave, which offers all the size and luxury features the MKT does, plus radically better styling, and a beautiful, well crafted interior, for $10-15,000 less? The only thing you miss is the ballistic engine, which may or may not be a selling point in this kind of car.

    On the other hand, my wife saw the MKT on line and said she really likes its looks…how do I talk her out of it?

  • avatar
    jpcavanaugh

    OK, Robert. Now, lets just sit down and take a couple of these with some water, and you’ll feel better.

    I think that if America’s children made it through the 50 Buick, the 62 Dodge, the Aztec and the Acura RL, they will be OK after this Lincoln.

    The Lincoln is certainly bold in the front. Personally, I am not bothered by it, and prefer it to, say, a Malibu or a Traverse. I am not a huge fan of the rear, but I could live with it. Profile? This is one good looking big people hauler. I think it is a lot more attractive than the pudgy Buick Enclave.

    Seriously, Lincoln should at least get some points for getting away from the badge-engineering of a few years ago. The new sheetmetal gives it a completely different look from the Flex, and I like it.

    My gripe is that under the skin, it seems to be pure Flex. The level of power is great, but it appears to be straight out of the Flex parts bin. I hope that this is a short-term fix and not a long term strategy for Lincoln, if Ford really wants to take it up-market.

    It is surprising that this MKT is not as quiet as expected, as FoMoCo has known how to do smooth and quiet better than almost anyone. I have not driven one, and will take your word for it. But all in all, it comes in at a price point not too far above the EcoBoost Flex.

    As much as I would like to see Lincoln put out some genuine first class high-end product, I think we are not far enough out from the Premium Auto Group days when Lincoln was not a priority. In the short amount of time since Mulally has been with us, I think that Lincoln has accomplished an awful lot with what they have had to work with.

    So, come on, Robert. Take a couple of deep breaths then take another look at a B9 Tribeca, and see if this hot rod Lincoln is really so bad.

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    Maybe because the Odysssey is automotive Ambien?

    I do not know what that means, but I do know that the Odyssey is the king of minivans, and the minivan that looks AND drives the least like one, and only snubbish soccer moms with some kind of a complex would prefer the Flex instead.

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    I would like some serious (and not one of these Detroit brownnoses that can find no fault with anybody in the once big 3) auto journalist interview the Ford-Lincoln Design team, that whacko Mays in particular, and ask them what they were really thinking when they came up with this useless nightmare. Were they drunk and hevaily sedated at the time? Don’t they realize how tough the Auto Sales environment is in the US today?

  • avatar
    kurkosdr

    If they bothered to spend 50$ to invite some volunteer testers and show them the vehicle, it would save them millions they now have to spend to produce and market the car.
    I guess responses would vary from “I would never buy a hearse, I ‘d rather have my Civic pimped by Xibit” and people leaving the room frightened.

    I wouldn’t want to be in the place of the director making the TV ads. Desperately trying to find a flattering angle for this ugly duckling…

  • avatar
    BDB

    I do not know what that means

    It’s a metaphor that means it’s so incredibly boring and bland, it puts you to sleep.

    Not to mention, it is also a minivan. The Flex is a crossover. Even though they serve very similar functions their markets have minimal overlap. Someone who is looking for a crossover does not want a minivan. The Flex competes with the Pilot, not the Odyssey.

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    “So, come on, Robert. Take a couple of deep breaths then take another look at a B9 Tribeca, and see if this hot rod Lincoln is really so bad.”

    Oh right. The MKsomething is better then the ugliest SUVC Ever, the Edsel-Aztec of Suvs, the Tribeca. Are your standards that low, Cavanaugh? Even a Kia Rio at 1/4th of the price of this atrocity Lincoln looks much better.

    And at least Subaru, allk of whose cars are rathewr ugly and boring in their exteriors, reacted immediately and changed the Tribeca’s weird-ugly face right the next year.

    We have only ONE US company left, Ford, but if it continues to commit automotive suicide with Lincoln, it will be forced to close down both that AND mercury in no time.

  • avatar
    lahru

    All I can think of when I look at this is Jim Carey in the Mask, when he says “smokin’”

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    BDB: “The Flex competes with the Odyssey, not the Pilot.”

    Really? Then which Ford product competes with the Odyssey? None? Really.

    OK, then what does the Edge compete from the Honda portfolio?

  • avatar
    BDB

    SherbornSean–

    Re-read what I wrote. I said the Flex competes with the Pilot, not the Odyssey. You got it backwards for some reason.

    The Edge competes with the CRV, obviously.

    And yeah, nothing Ford has competes with the Odyssey Because Ford doesn’t have a minivan.

    As strange as it may seem, even though full-size crossovers and minivans serve many of the same purposes, they don’t compete with each other. The whole point of the crossover segment is to give minivan functionality to people who wouldn’t be caught dead in a real minivan.

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    “BDB :
    October 26th, 2009 at 12:57 pm

    SherbornSean–

    The Edge competes with the CRV, obviously.”

    You can’t possibly be serious.

    The Edge, which at least looks cute, is far bigger and heavier than the CR-V.

    Are you at all familiar with their respective specs?

    And have you seen the sales numbers? The CR-V sells TEN TIMES the units that the Edge is currently selling.

  • avatar
    BDB

    Autosavant, they’re both compact crossovers, they’re both around the same price range. The fact that one outsells the other or one weighs more doesn’t change any of that.

    They’re 5-passenger compact crossovers in the same price range. Is it that hard for you to understand?

  • avatar
    Canucknucklehead

    Nah, nah, nah, nah, nah, na, ha, BATMAN! Batteries to power, turbines to speed!

    I want to take my kids out on Halloween in this thing!

  • avatar
    jamie1

    Who cares, a SnOb SnUbs. Ford is our LAST HOPE, as GM and Chrysler are bvankrupt, gigantic welfare queens, but Lincoln has really lost its way!!! And Ford will pay dearly for that, and I am afraid that I the US taxpayer will soon be asked to bail IT our too!

    I care – accuracy is important to me and should be to you too.

    You will not be required to hand over any money to bail out Ford. Indeed, if you were bright enough to do so, you should have invested in Ford when its shares were at $1.01 – their performance since then has been nothing less than stellar putting the lie to your idea that Ford does not know what it is doing either with the Blue Oval or Lincoln. Ford is not anywhere near going bankrupt (or even bvankrupt as you put it) so please stick to facts rather than rhetoric.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I would rather have an Odyssey. The only thing preventing me from ordering a Honda is that I can see them coming and going in my neighborhood. All day. In every color. Maybe I will get a “custom” paint job ;)

  • avatar
    BDB

    jamie1–

    I think Autosavant has Asperger’s Syndrome. That’s not a cheap slam, I’m serious.

  • avatar
    BDB

    Only a mindless “slave to fashion” soccer mom would think that. AS IF a STUPIDUGLYVEHICLE (SUV) or its onbese cousins the CUVs are any better!!!

    Well, guess what, a lot of people do. Minivans are a shrinking market. CUVs are growing, and since the purpose of a company is to make money, getting out of the minivan market and into full-size CUVs is a good move.

    BTW, the caps lock key is not cruise control for “cool”.

  • avatar
    shabster

    Reading between the lines, I think Mr. Farago’s telling us that the MKT is a must-buy….

    Although, I gotta agree with review.

  • avatar
    Jim Cherry

    Havent’ driven the car. And I’m no fan of crossovers (or SUVS) generally. But, that said, I have to disagree with the statements on styling here. It seems like nearly everyone complains about the “me too” jellybeans clogging our highways, but they freak out if any car maker dares to design some personality and character in their cars. I like the new Lincoln grills that harken back to the old Zephyrs and Continentals. For a different view entirely, see this: http://www.examiner.com/examiner/x-6882-Classic-Autos-Examiner~y2009m10d16-How-Lincoln-got-its-groove-back-Classic-styling-clever-engineering-and-branding-unity

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    It is not that Ford did not try, repeatedly, and Failed, miserably, to develop and sell a minivan.

    After repeated and disastrous (financially) failures, (Aerostar, Windstar, Freestar, and other mediocre to god-awful non-Stars), they just surrendered, not snubbed, the Minivan market. to set the record straight. And so did GM.

    Ford currently is doing OK beause they recognized their own incompetence and replaced their management with an OUTSIDER CEO from Boeing. THAT, and not their largely boring vehicles, saved them, so far.

    Lincolns sell for almost twice their equivalent Fords, and are much uglier. How can Lincoln hope to survive?

    The Original Taurus was indeed a home run and saved the severely troubled FOrd in the mid-80s. I know people who bought the stock then and did well. Today’s obese new Taurus is an expensive, low-volume vehicle. Ford itself plans to make only 100,000 of them, instead of the 400,000 and the huge profits the original Taurus had.

    Today’s home runs with 400,000 and 450,000 sales a year are boring Camrys and Accords.

  • avatar
    alfred p. sloan

    i was gonna flame this Lincoln too, but it looks like I will be shut down by the Lincoln PR rep, Jamie1.

  • avatar
    BDB

    The new Taurus isn’t meant to have the same sales as the old one. It has the same name but it has moved into a different class (full size vs. mid-size). It competes with the Avalon, not the Camry.

    The present day equivalent of the ’80s Taurus in the Fusion.

  • avatar
    jamie1

    Ford currently is doing OK beause they recognized their own incompetence and replaced their management with an OUTSIDER CEO from Boeing. THAT, and not their largely boring vehicles, saved them, so far.

    Again, incorrect. Ford makes money from selling cars not from hiring a new CEO. Mulally has done many great things but he would be the first to admit he can’t do everything. The ‘largely boring vehicles’ that you erroneously refer to are the same ones that have grown Ford’s market share for 11 of the last 12 months. Mulally has brought to Ford a focus on making use of its assets around the world. That is, and will be, his legacy. Interestingly, he found that the management at Ford was of a very high quality – that is why the people at the top of the company now are largely the exact same people that were there when he took over. Quite a contrast to the other US manufacturers and even Toyota.

    By the way, it is ‘because’ not ‘beause’ – can you not at least turn the spell check on?

  • avatar
    rocketrodeo

    Wow. I get that the car is polarizing. But to the point that it hinders your ability to render anything approaching a rational evaluation, that’s REALLY polarizing.

    I’ve driven the car. Smells fine. Must have had different leather. Interior bears a strong resemblance to other 2010 Lincolns, the MKZ and MKS particularly. The second row is the best I’ve ever experienced, in ANYTHING. If you want to pamper more than one passenger, I don’t see any competition at all. Cool toys too.

    More importantly, it drives fine. Great, even. Well composed, plenty quick, corners without drama; RSC intervenes a little sooner than I’d like, though. One forgets that it weighs over 5,000 lbs pretty quickly.

    Overall, I think it’s probably the most competent American station wagon ever. And no, I didn’t like the way it looks initially. It’s growing on me, though, like a lot of newer designs have a tendency to do.

  • avatar
    sfdennis1

    Been a Lincoln fan ever since I was a young’un and my parents had a Mark IV, and then a Mark V in the 70′s…tufted leather, opera windows, etc. talk about pimp my ride!

    Those 70′s Marks may have been land whales in size/weight, but unfortunately, this thing takes the whale thing too literally in appearance…looks like a 20 ft. humpback hit with an ugly stick.

    I think Ford was trying too hard in an attempt to differentiate it from the Flex, and just went overboard. Scaled down a bit (or exucuted more artfully), the grill, retro tailgate and horizontal lights in back and side profile could have been attractive (or at least not hideous).

    Where they should have gone ALL OUT was the interior, as the Flex is already has a pretty well outfitted there. Doesn’t look like they went far enough upgrading the MKT’s interior…it’s different, but no more posh, than the Flex’s.

    Uglier styling, comparable interior luxury and a higher pricetag do not make a winner for Lincoln…just sad.

  • avatar
    fotobits

    Wow. The site censors are certainly busy deleting comments such as this one:
    “This is one of the most poorly written pieces of journalism it has ever been my misfortune to read.”

    Come on Farago, if you’re going to trash Ford engineers for not thinking you can at least take the time to make an editing pass through your article, and run spell check. You should be embarrassed by the grade school errors in your writing. Sloppy writing indicates sloppy thinking, and reflects poorly on your journalistic integrity.

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    jamie1 :

    You have no clue, if you think that Mullaly, with his defensive anticipatory measures, did not save Ford from becoming another gigantic GM-like Welfare QUeen.
    ]
    I am not interested in wasting any more time reading your clueless attacks, But for full dicslosure,

    Please Reveal any conflicts of Interest. Are you a FORD EMPLOYEE? Or at least a Ford Stockholder? (LOL). ANd note that wishful thinking alone did not save the Titanic.

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    PS as you can see, I purposely left a few typos for you to gloat about, Miss (or is it Ms) Editor Person. But you can resat assured that I have always been an effortlessly very good speller in any language I speak, incl those far more difficult to spell than English.

  • avatar
    CopperCountry

    Great review, but I must be a little nit-picky. If you’re going to paraphrase that great Strother Martin line from Cool Hand Luke in your synopsis of the interior (i.e. “What we have is a failure to luxuriate”), please leave the ‘a’ out of it. If Strother had added an ‘a’ to his line, it wouldn’t have had the same impact:

    “What we’ve got here … is failure to communicate”

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    Not one of the Current Lincolns is even remotely attractive. They are unnecessarily Obese and ugly. They look bloated, even if they do not have such a god-awful grille as this monkey has. They are overpriced and they do not even have a V8. The Ecoboost is great if it proves reliable, but Luxury car buyers of Domestic vehicles will not easily pay $50k or more for something that does not even have a healthy big v8 underneath.

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    “What we have is a failure to luxuriate”), please leave the ‘a’ out of it. If Strother had added an ‘a’ to his line, it wouldn’t have had the same impact:

    “What we’ve got here … is failure to communicate”

    And since we are now in the Arts and stuff,

    How many (lincoln) Failures; Let me count the ways!

    Failure to Control Weight!

    Failure to pass Aesthetics 101 (exterior atrocious styling)

    Failure to price competitively

    Failure to achieve the WORLD CLASS INTERIOR a Lincoln SHOULD have

    being but a few…

  • avatar
    rockit

    Autosavant:

    Buddy, stop flaming the comments, you made your point 11 posts ago. And don’t go nuts on anyone who disagrees with you. (jamie1)

  • avatar
    BDB

    Autosavant–

    Another reason Ford and GM left the minivan market is because it is a shrinking market. They’re not nearly as popular as they used to be.

    Full size crossovers, OTOH, are a growing market. It makes complete sense from a business point of view.

  • avatar
    eamiller

    BDB :
    October 26th, 2009 at 1:02 pm

    Autosavant, they’re both compact crossovers, they’re both around the same price range. The fact that one outsells the other or one weighs more doesn’t change any of that.

    They’re 5-passenger compact crossovers in the same price range. Is it that hard for you to understand?

    BDB, I think you live on a different planet. NOBODY cross shops a CR-V and a Ford Flex, other than to look at one or the other in passing and outright dismiss it.

    The Flex is a full 8in longer (a big difference), 663lbs heavier and comes equipped with a mandatory V6 engine (vs. the mandatory 4-cylinder in the CR-V. Not to mention the $5675 MSRP difference in base price. Edmunds lists the Flex not as a “Compact SUV” but as a “Midsize SUV”. Perhaps you are thinking of the Ford Escape, which is somewhat competitive with the CR-V.

    You’ve lost all credibility with this series of comments, in my mind. Even my grandmother can tell the difference.

    Ford Edge/Flex == Honda Pilot (overlap in size/price)
    Ford Escape == Honda CR-V

  • avatar
    BDB

    BDB, I think you live on a different planet. NOBODY cross shops a CR-V and a Ford Flex,

    I agree, which is why I said the Edge competes with the CRV. Re-read, please

    When I said “they’re both compact crossovers” “both” referred to the Edge and CRV, not the CRV and Flex. Sorry if I wasn’t clear.

  • avatar

    I HATED THIS CAR.

    Its UGLY compared to the new SRX even though it holds more people.

    Its driver position SUCKS. The Edge’s driving position is actually better but the big downside is NO TILT AND TELESCOPE STEERING WHEEL.

    HOW DO THEY KEEP FKING THIS UP AT FORD?

  • avatar
    texlovera

    It is truly saddening to see what a monstrosity Ford has produced, especially as they were the only one of the Big 3 to more or less pass on the bailout money. But there is just no excusing the outward design of this car. As others have said, what the hell were they thinking??? Going for a different look is OK; being different AND ugly is a fail.

    Also, at least in my case, CUVs and minivans do compete with each other. Our last purchase was an Odyssey, but we also looked at the X-overs too. Our choice was dictated by price, value, reliability and interior room. If styling had been the main criteria, we’d have probably gone with the CX-9.

  • avatar
    BDB

    So nobody misunderstands what I was saying (two different people got what I said backward twice!)

    Edge=CR-V
    Flex=Pilot

    And nothing competes with the Odyssey outright, since Ford doesn’t have a minivan. There MAY be some people cross-shoping the Odyssey and Flex, but IMHO they’re far more likely to be looking at the Pilot.

  • avatar

    LOL

    You compared it to an ALIEN XENOMORPH. I didn’t think of that one.

    I think it looks like a Whale’s BALEEN teeth.

  • avatar
    frizzlefry

    All issues aside, how ugly it is, how it smells, how bad it handles, how it has too much power etc etc etc…..there is one thing that I consider absolutely idiotic…

    Why the heck are the back-up lights where they are??? I am very surprised the NHTSA have not blown their tops off over that design idea. Its completely ridiculous and unsafe, especially on a vehicle that big. The fact that Lincoln decided that was a good design idea tells me where their heads where when they designed this thing…up their butts.

  • avatar
    BDB

    And I’m aware even that doesn’t line up perfectly–Ford’s CUV lineup more closely mirrors Toyota than Honda’s, with the Escape=RAV 4 and the Edge=Venza.

  • avatar

    Amen, Robert, amen.

  • avatar
    ohsnapback

    The first paragraph is hilarious enough, but Robert had to go and continue to one-up himself throughout the rest of the review!

    After literally becoming frustrated with all the glowing praises of Lincoln and Ford products around TTAC lately, I made it a point to test drive an MKS last Thursday, @ 7:00 pm-ish.

    I can only report that all my suspicions of cheap interior bits, a crashy suspension, cheap paddle style transmission controls, and a very noisy motor, especially in ‘EcoBoost’ (yes, I drove both the base and EcoBoost-ed models) was more the reality than I wished.

    You see, I wish for Lincoln to succeed, but if you take a gander at the initial reports from owners, on top of the crashy suspension, cheap interior elements, noisy motor, high price tags, etc., the early adopters of the MKS and MKT and MK-whatevers are mad as hell about quality issues from flaky transmissions (like this one in the review that quit) to electronic and electrical gremlins ala Mercedes circa-2003.

    Shame, really.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    yes, the front is rediculous. however, I kinda like the rear end.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    My eyes!!!!

  • avatar
    saponetta

    NEW AUTO JOURNALIST CLICHE ALERT

    “The ****** is the answer to a question that no one asked”

    This is used in every other review on this site.

  • avatar
    noreserve

    The MarKeT is going to MocK iT. It’s not going to MaKe iT. Sorry, this monstrosity, like my weak attempt at humor, is going to grin right off the cliff in a flaming dive.

  • avatar

    I was a little surprised at this review because I thought opinion was pretty positive around the Flex (including on TTAC).

    Is the MKT more (less?) than a rebadge of the Flex? I had thought the Flex was considered pretty quiet and well packaged, with decent materials (haven’t test driven so only know from reviews). Or is it a case of the Flex being fine for its market but the MKT being outclassed in its market sector?

    Sad if the rebadge made a worse car for more money. Given the exterior design, that doesn’t seem impossible but it’s almost as if that was the goal…

  • avatar
    Jeffer

    I’m gonna shed a little light on the “unusual” design of the front end. The designer is a huge fan of Futurama and the grille pays homage to his favorite character…Dr. Zoidberg.

  • avatar
    mtymsi

    For the life of me I can’t figure out why Ford keeps J. Mays around. Here is but another glaring example of not only truly miserable styling but also Ford’s inability to run a luxury car division.

    As well as they’re doing on the Ford side they’re doing equally poorly on the L-M side. A few more blunders and they can just turn off the lights.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    If they dropped the price by $10k and changed the grille, maybe it should go as a Mercury. Then they should kill it anyway.

  • avatar
    folkdancer

    Are grills really necessary? Don’t modern cars take in all the air they need from the small opening under the front bumper? Wouldn’t a huge unnecessary grill like this rob 2 or 3 mpg?

    This Lincoln grill is definitely from a laughing baleen wheel. Baleen whales are harmless creatures (except to small shrimp).

  • avatar
    thingsabove

    The photos you’ve posted distort the perspective. The human eye does not perceive the front and rear ends of the car as they are pictured here.

    Take a look at Google images for this car and you’ll see it imaged in it’s proper perspective. The front and rear end look far less dramatic.

  • avatar
    drifter

    This car is no uglier than a BMW 5GT

  • avatar
    rockit

    dkulmacz :

    “At least you’ve made the dogpile crew happy . . . I can think of a few regular posters who probably orgasmed while reading this.”

    That statement actually made me laugh out loud.

    I personally take all these reviews with a grain of salt, it is only 1 opinion. We are all allowed to respond in favor or against any review – and I do like lots of reviews on the site. Some of the posters however just take it way too far….

    “After literally becoming frustrated with all the glowing praises of Lincoln and Ford products around TTAC lately, I made it a point to test drive an MKS last Thursday, @ 7:00 pm-ish…”

    Wow. LOL

  • avatar
    NoSubstitute

    jamie1 :”Here is the review from Car and Driver … their balanced and well -written review is in stark contrast to the effort above.”

    If I wanted balance I’d read The Truth About Feng Shui. As to well written, I defy you to extract a sentence from the CD piece that compares to :

    “The MKT is more Hyundai than hot rod; it’s Sonata sports wagon it Hertz.”

  • avatar
    Porsche986

    Wow Robert, ZERO stars? I am not going to disagree with much of what you said regarding how ugly this car is… and obviously only those that have actually been in the interior can comment on it’s build quality… but ZERO? This is not really the content I expected at TTAC.

    It’s hideous looking… probably one of the worst looking cars of all time actually. Tribeca (V1.0) Aztec? Acura TL? MKT? Panamera? All simply hideous looking cars.

    As for some of the other comments on here:

    Did everyone on here take their meds today? I mean, get real!

    Who compares a Ford Edge to a CRV? They simply do not compete, in any alternate reality.

    I am starting to think all of the crazy posters from sites like Car and Driver, Automobile, etc are starting to populate this site. This site USED to be pretty balanced, if somewhat outrageous in it’s content… but some of the posts are just simply ruining the site.

  • avatar

    I really liked the MKR concept, though it was a bit polarizing. I also don’t have a problem with the bow wave grille, if it’s not overdone – it’s certainly a distinctive styling feature that gives Lincoln a face that stands out.

    The MKT, though, is an awkward design from just about every angle. It’s a vehicle designed to a spec sheet, a market segment.

    It’s not like Lincoln has never made a garish car. The most recent Navigator with its over under chrome grille looked like a rapper with gold braces on his teeth.

  • avatar

    brace of beta blockers

    Appreciate alliteration, Farago?

    Try saying brace of beta blockers fast.

  • avatar
    Xierosix

    It may be ugly, but people DID buy the Pontiac Aztek… So maybe there’s a glimmer of hope, that Lincoln can break even on this car.

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    OH, MY EYES!

    This must be a concept car, not a car that they will actually sell?

  • avatar

    LOL “mouse fur”

    I gotta use that one.

  • avatar
    jacksonbart

    Have you driven a Ford lately?

  • avatar
    th009

    @Autosavant: “But you can resat assured that I have always been an effortlessly very good speller in any language I speak, incl those far more difficult to spell than English.”

    I actually cannot think of a language that’s more difficult to spell than English. Really. Who else actually has spelling classes or spelling competitions for kids?

    As for the Lincoln … surprise and delight? Well, I’ll give them one out of two on that.

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    As I had said before (before the article was pulled on Sunday, and all of the comments deleted) it is clear when a reviewers goes into a review determined to hate a product, and puts a microscope on minor details to prove a predetermined point.

    Coming from the perspective of someone who has to sell these, the MKT isn’t perfect, but it is a hell of a lot better than this review makes it out to be. Some points…

    Exterior Styling: Polarizing is the best description for the MKT. Compared to the Flex however, which for some reason prompted customers shopping for completely different cars to pull us aside just to tell us how ugly they thought it looked, the MKT looks like a Maserati, at least in the public’s eye. I have had an overwhelming number of positive comments on the styling vs negative from people seeing it in person at the dealership, including a gentleman who was so taken as to proclaim that the MKT is an example that Ford finally ‘gets it’. The little foam bits under the hood aren’t there to prevent rattle, the hood is so well secured it can’t rattle. They are secured through pass-through holes, not glue, and appear to be there as some kind of sound insulation. I’m not sure why Ford went with foam instead of just more rubber, but one isn’t likely any more or less costly than the other, and they are so out of the way that most owners or shoppers will never see them anyway.

    Interior: There is no foul smell whatsoever. The leather smells and feels rich, and is of superior quality to what you find in even much more expensive luxury SUV/CUVs. The bronzed plastic on the center stack is appealing in appearance and to the touch. The wood is all real, and of nice shades with good grain. Any surface that will be touched with any regularity is covered with leather or high quality leatherette. The seats are supportive and well bolstered as well as being soft and comfortable. The glove box is nicely weighted and has a luxury heft, as well as smooth strut actuated movement on opening and closing, and it along with the center console are covered inside with a rich feltlike material. The center console provides spaces to place your MP3 player or phone, as well as the USB connections to connect them.

    Front seats are air conditioned and heated standard, second row is heated standard, heated and cooled if you go with buckets, and all three rows have AC vents standard. A panoramic glass roof is almost standard, lending an airy feeling when opened. The ‘mouse fur’ on the sides of the third row is there as that area will most often serve as cargo storage, and the fur won’t scratch like plastic or leather would. The third row is a tight fit for adults, and really shouldn’t be used for anyone taller than 5’9″ or so, but considering you can seat up to five in the first two rows in great comfort, how many people would ever put adults in the third row anyway?

    Compared to other luxury CUV/SUVs it is hands down better than anything else at the same price, and even better than those that costs thousands more. The interior is more enveloping and luxurious than a Lexus LX570, and makes the $125K Porsche Cayenne Turbo feel like a Tonka toy. The only luxury SUV which I have driven that I can say has a clearly superior interior, at least from a touch and feel perspective, not necessarily ergonomics, is the Mercedes GL, but similarly equipped a loaded MKT EcoBoost is $58K vs the GL450s $73K.

    Engines: The base 3.7 liter feels a little strained under the weight of the MKT, and can get noisy when pushed on acceleration. The EcoBoost is smooth and powerful upon request at any speed, and while the exhaust note isn’t as throaty as I would like, it outperforms a lot of V8s and offers far superior fuel economy.

    Ride & Handling: With standard wheels the ride is supple without being boatlike, and the handling is what you would expect from a large CUV or SUV – competent but not sporty. The 20″ wheels do add a bit more road feel over bumps and imperfect pavement than I would prefer, but most shoppers in this segment love the big wheels. In fact, despite how many times I recommend that a customer go with the smaller wheels if they want a more supple ride, after test driving two cars identical but for the rim diameter, they nearly always swear that the bigger wheels make the car ride much more smoothly. I suppose there is always something to be said for the placebo effect.

    The D3 chassis is one of the stiffest and safest on the market. There is no discernible body flex, no creaking, very little roll, and if the chassis gets unsettled over a very rough patch it returns to tracking true almost instantaneously.

    Toys & Features: The MKT has more toys and features than just about any other vehicle in its class, and a lot of it is standard. As listed above heated and air conditioned seats are standard (AC seats are a woefully underutilized feature, I’ve never used the heat feature on a seat in my life, but I turn the AC on every chance I get), as is a panoramic (full length) glass roof, a LCD touchscreen, Sync powered Bluetooth and iPod integration (the best on the market), triple zone air conditioning, full length head curtain airbags, HID headlamps that swivel when you turn, rain sensing wipers, automatic high beams that detect other cars on the road, a rear view camera, a power tailgate, powerfold second row seats, adjustable pedals with memory (along with the memory heigh adjustable driver’s seat and power tilt/telescope steering wheel) keyless ignition, and a host of other features. A base $45K MKT has more standard equipment than competitors that start at over $10K more, which then go on to charge exorbitant sums for the same options you get free with the MKT.

    Optional equipment covers all the bases from the best Nav system on the market with voice recognition that works so well you’ll never have to pull over to input an address, self parking ability that works better than 99% of the parallel parkers on the road, and works quickly, laser-guided cruise control, a blind spot warning system that is as intuitive and unobtrusive to use as it is helpful, and which comes with an exclusive ability to warn you if you are backing out blind into oncoming crosstraffic, a THX II certified audio system that sounds just as good if not better than the Lexus Mark Levinson or Audi Bang and Olufson (and costs a lot less), and of course the EcoBoost engine that gets the same or better fuel economy than competitors V6 engines, but offers more power than a lot of V8s.

    Value: This is really where the MKT stands strong in the luxury SUV/CUV field. Sure, there are competitors that do certain things better, whether that be a slightly more polished interior, a better sounding engine, or more sporting driving dynamics, but none come with as much equipment or offer enough improvement over the MKT for the price premium they demand for it to make sense for most buyers.

    Someone with limitless funds can of course buy a slightly more refined product, and if it makes sense to them to pay a $10K plus (in most cases a much larger plus) price premium for a Mercedes, Lexus, Land Rover, or Audi vehicle, more power to them.

    From what I have seen so far though, even luxury buyers appreciate value, after all, most didn’t make the money they have by spending wildly. As far as sales go, the MKT has been a hit at my dealership, we can’t keep the highly optioned EcoBoost versions in stock. Look for October sales results to paint a much better picture for the success of the vehicle than Septembers, as most dealers have only received their initial allocations over the past several weeks.

  • avatar
    visualry

    Mulally has brought to Ford a focus on making use of its assets around the world. That is, and will be, his legacy. Interestingly, he found that the management at Ford was of a very high quality – that is why the people at the top of the company now are largely the exact same people that were there when he took over. Quite a contrast to the other US manufacturers and even Toyota.

    Knowing when to bring in fresh blood to lead IS the sign of competent (quality) management!

    hingsabove :
    October 26th, 2009 at 4:48 pm

    The photos you’ve posted distort the perspective. The human eye does not perceive the front and rear ends of the car as they are pictured here

    Yep! The Mazda 3 was excoriated here for the same sleight of hand. Put a license plate in the middle of that 3 grin and it looks normal in person.

    I suspect the foam has more to do with dampening some whistle or wind noise as it makes it’s way through the gigantic grill, only to have concentrated the outflow through the little channels left on either side of the rear rubber hood seal.

  • avatar
    Via Nocturna

    Just when I was starting to warm up to Ford products again, FoMoCo gives me this train wreck to admire. I honestly thought that first pic showing the front was done with a fish-eye lens, but then the appalling reality dawned. These are some of the worst proportions I’ve seen in a long time, especially the headlights/grille.

    I am SO ready for this CUV fad to die.

  • avatar
    Mr. Sparky

    Ok, the 2010 MKS gets 4 stars and the MKT which is really nothing more than MKS wagon gets 0 stars from the same organization? Oh, don’t forget the favorable review of the Flex Ecoboost which rolls off the same assembly line.

    Houston, I mean TTAC, we have a problem. This doesn’t compute. Actually, it does compute, but we aren’t allowed to flame the site or its editors (or former editor as the case may be).

  • avatar
    npbheights

    Wasn’t the Batmobile based on a Lincoln concept car? Is that what they were going for? I am a big Lincoln fan and have been all my life- When my parents met my dad had a ’76 Mark IV, when I was born I was taken home from the hospital in a ’77 Versailles with a balanced and blueprinted 351, I was driven to school every day mostly in Lincolns, We had an ’85 Continental, an ’88 Mark VII, my older brother had a white Mark VI in high school, My first car was a ’79 Town Coupe. I’ve had a Mark V Collectors Series, a 91 Townie Limo, and ’97 Mark VIII. I currently have a mint ’79 Town Car. My mom currently has an ’07 MKZ AWD. My point is not to brag (most of you probably feel bad for me anyway) but if this vehicle is going to appeal to anyone, it would be me and this thing is an epic fail for me, I hate it.

  • avatar
    Z71_Silvy

    I too am wondering what the point of this monstrosity is. People who are shopping *real* luxury makes will not give this a second look. Sadly, Lincoln has become the Tata of luxury makes.

    Just like with the Taurus and it’s Lincoln twin, one would be much better off going with the Flex (despite the Flex being a bit overpriced) as it is 98% the same vehicle.

    Lincoln needs to sweat the small stuff….and clearly, they haven’t with their fancy Ford lineup.

  • avatar
    San Giuseppe

    I’ll disagree (somewhat). Yes, this vehicle is less than stellar but it has good bones. I was hoping for sporty alternative to the Flex–something closer to the Audi Q7

  • avatar

    Nullmoto

    I’d rather take my money and buy a Ford Flex…BUT, I couldn’t even do that because the steering wheel does not fully tilt or telescope far enough for tall men.

    I’ve been in the Toyota Venza and liked its interior space more. And I HATE TOYOTA.

    I’d never, ever want an MKT. If you have to sell these, I feel really, really bad for you.

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    Flashpoint –

    I’ll agree with you that the Flex makes a compelling case for itself. I’m a little over 6′ and I find the wheel on the Flex fits me fine. In any case, the 2010 Flex now has a telescoping wheel (some of the early 2010s might only tilt, but any being produced now should have it).

  • avatar

    Ford products are awesome.

    Lincoln products SUCK because they will always be compared to Lexus/Mercedes/BMW and Audi due to their price, but really can’t compete with any of those brands.

    These cars are for RETIREES who came from an era where owning a Lincoln or Cadillac was a status symbol. Long before American markets were threatened by German and Japanese imports.

    my uncle (retired cop) owns an MKZ.

    my other uncle (retired cop) owns a Navigator and an LS….hand builds Capris with parts ordered from Europe and hand builds Mustangs.

    my other uncle (business professor) used to be a huge lincoln lover but he moved over to Jaguar S which I personally think are geriatric and dull.

    The moment they start talking that bullshit about “Ford quality” and engine power I threaten to race them with my S550 and they shut up real quick.

  • avatar
    pacificpom2

    Now I know where the designers of the AU Falcon went to, they were hidden in the bowels of Ford’s design centre, only to be let loose again. Yech!!

  • avatar
    cpmanx

    Funny piece, but let’s be clear about what it is–a writer enjoying the power of writing, going on a joyride of metaphor and alliteration. This is not a “review,” since it’s clear that RF began with a conclusion long before stepping into the vehicle; the disparities between the ratings for the MKT and those for the Flex and MKS pretty much demonstrate that.

    As for the MKT’s styling, the subject of so many comments here…if RF and a number of others don’t like it, that’s their business. I’m not crazy about it either. Then again, this beast is no weirder-looking to my eyes than an Infiniti QX56, or a BMW X6, or a Mercedes GL. I find them all garish and off-putting, with the Infiniti probably the worst offender since there is no rhyme or reason to its lines.

    And really, let’s give a rest to the “ow, my eyes!” comment, which I’ve now seen posted about nearly every vehicle on the market other than the Aston Martin Rapide.

    All that said, I’m sorry to see RF go. He’s awfully good at stirring people up.

  • avatar
    Aqua225

    Flashpoint:

    Your S550 doesn’t impress. If you pay that much for a car, I’d expect much better. Not only that, but 5.4 seconds to 60 is pretty lame. Even the Mustang 3-valve 4.6L currently shipping is very competitive with the straight line performance of your car. I doubt seriously that a monster of a car like a S550 could corner even near what a Mustang GT could. If your Uncle(s) are building Mustangs, I am absolutely sure (if they know what they are doing) they have one in the garage that’ll smoke your S550 either in a straight line or in the curves. If they are only building “stock” level old stangs, that’s the only way I could comprehend slow machines.

    Now a Jaguar S may be beneath your S550′s performance curve, but it is a British car that is NOT a Bently, so there ya go…

    I’ll weigh in with my MKT opinion: looks nice to me. I am a bit concerned about the glued on foam pieces though. Ford needs to design and build it right the first time. Ford, GM, and Chrysler must understand the impact these little “fixes” have on overall opinion of the vehicle. I was let down by the counter weights on the Camaro SS as well that Farago described.

    It just smacks of what passes as top flight American mechanical engineering in car brands nowdays. These fixes seem like the product was rushed to market. Then again, the rule is never buy a year-1 anything, goes for cars, computers, and just about any other complex system… but to me, I will give Flashpoint this, the Germans & Asians seem to get it right the first time, when it’s about cars.

    David

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    You know, RF, if you don’t like this car – and it sounds like there are good reasons for that – that’s one thing. But calling someone’s intelligence into question for buying it is another.

    There’s a difference between sarcasm and vitriol. This review would have been better without the latter.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Aqua225 :
    October 27th, 2009 at 12:51 am

    Flashpoint:

    Your S550 doesn’t impress. If you pay that much for a car, I’d expect much better. Not only that, but 5.4 seconds to 60 is pretty lame. Even the Mustang 3-valve 4.6L currently shipping is very competitive with the straight line performance of your car. I doubt seriously that a monster of a car like a S550 could corner even near what a Mustang GT could.

    Perhaps, but I doubt a Mustang GT could carry four adults in private jet comfort and luxury all day at 160 mph. Then again, could a S-class Benz do a smoky burnout?

    I’d say these two cars have different missions, wouldn’t you?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    NulloModo :
    October 26th, 2009 at 9:17 pm

    The little foam bits under the hood aren’t there to prevent rattle, the hood is so well secured it can’t rattle. They are secured through pass-through holes, not glue, and appear to be there as some kind of sound insulation. I’m not sure why Ford went with foam instead of just more rubber, but one isn’t likely any more or less costly than the other, and they are so out of the way that most owners or shoppers will never see them anyway.

    Point taken, but here’s mine: this is a $60,000 car we’re talking about, and if Lincoln wants to be taken seriously at that price point, that kind of stuff just can’t be there. I’m on record criticizing the negative tone of this article, but RF’s on target with this criticism.

    I also have driven the MKS, and while the overall quality of interior trim was good, I noticed quite a few trim bits that wouldn’t pass muster in other cars costing $50,000. The door handles felt cheap, and the doors themselves didn’t slam home with the same solidity that you find in, say, a BMW…or, for that matter, a Caddy CTS or STS.

    I think Lincoln’s done a good job making a distinctive-looking car with genuine performance cred, but in this market, details count for everything. They clearly have some work to do.

  • avatar

    Freedmike

    Thanks for the save.

    If I’d wanted a race car for a guy my size, I’d have gotten a SHO or an SRt8 with Methanol bottle added.

    I just love comfort and quietness.

  • avatar

    I showed this review to one of my uncles (the Jaguar S owner) and he said: “its like Dejavu – TTAC said the same thing about the MKS”.

    I had to tell him Jack Baruth liked it while Mike Karesh didn’t.

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    I do not know if those who attack the critics of this automotive atrocity are Ford Employees, but if they are, their attacks will not save Lincoln, they only prove they are in the deepest of Denials.

    What Ford needs to do with this vehicle is, even only one year after its launch, a MAJOR Redesign.

    Subaru did it with the abominable Tribeca. the MKZ is worse.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Flashpoint :
    October 27th, 2009 at 7:29 am

    Freedmike

    Thanks for the save.

    If I’d wanted a race car for a guy my size, I’d have gotten a SHO or an SRt8 with Methanol bottle added.

    I just love comfort and quietness.

    No prob. I wasn’t really defending the S550 per se, even though I really like it – just pointing out that different cars have different missions. Personally, i’m with you – I like cars that can do it all, and if that includes treating me like a foreign dignitary, I’m totally down with that.

  • avatar
    aaahrg

    This guy went a little bit crazy. Maybe a lot crazy. Doesn’t he sound a bit manic? Like the car’s desinger ran off with his wife.

    The car is beautiful. Different. The interior is world class. I was shocked when I saw it at the NA Auto Show. My girlfriend, bored at the time, dragged me over to it. We both love it

  • avatar
    guyincognito

    RF,

    I think you pulled too many punches in this article. The MKT is deserving of a “flying vagina” type insult, IMHO. I hate the new Lincoln grill and this vehicle wears it the worst.

    Also, as I’ve said, I think badge engineered FWD V6 powered Lincoln’s are not luxurious or desireable enough to compete with the entry luxury class nor to justify their purchase over their Ford bretheren. The twin turbo V6 is also ill suited to the brand. It does not get better fuel economy than the Volvo V8 found in the S80, and the extra power is superfluous for this class.

    The only good thing I can say for Lincoln is that they are at least sticking with one design direction rather than the all over the map approach of the last 10 years, even if that design direction sucks.

  • avatar
    Justin Berkowitz

    I think the MKT was a very poor choice for Ford. The Flex, on which this is based, is already a very impressive vehicle and a weak seller. It’s also pretty expensive with options.

    Big luxurious wagons have done badly in the U.S. for years now. In addition to the Flex, how about the Mercedes R-Class and Chrysler Pacifica?

    The MKX sells fairly well for Lincoln; I’d sooner have seen the MKT’s development budget going into making the MKX even better. Or into making the MKZ sedan more competitive.

    Also, I wouldn’t blame Lincoln alone for this, but I’m really sick of alphanumeric names and Lincoln’s are among the most confusing. I’d be much happier seeing Zephyr, Aviator, and Continental on their cars.

  • avatar
    manny

    Forget the car! This review is a great script for a sci-fi blockbuster. Just throw Leslie Nielsen in the mix!

  • avatar
    revolver1978

    I don’t mind the front, it certianly is different. It remins me much of a certain disney villain, Maximillion from The Black Hole.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    I’m glad Lincoln created this monstrosity, as it provided me with an entertaining read; both the article and the comments. Thanks to this site, I think I’ll be more amused than horrified when I actually see one in public.

  • avatar
    jamie1

    http://www.speedsportlife.com/2009/09/21/avoidable-contact-28-lincoln-and-cadillac-mkt-and-cts-v-one-last-time-to-the-death/

    Thought everyone might be interested to read what TTAC’s own Jack Baruth made of the MKT in his recent review. Goes to show there are always two sides to every story.

  • avatar
    Autosavant

    “Goes to show there are always two sides to every story”

    I really would care less how many sides there are to the Subaru Tribeca, the Ford Edsel, or the abominable Pontiac Aztec.

    No matter what anybody says, they all SUCKED. Big Time.

  • avatar
    cleek

    Looks like it was designed for a re-make of the “Munsters”.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Lincolns current lineup is a mess of alphanumerically named, bloated squinty windowed FWD based nightmares with enormous oversized front ends. The only car they have that looks ok is the MKZ but even that car doesn’t look like it’s price tag. Sticking an oversized toothy grille on a Fusion and the Sport models 3.5 V6 is not enough to tell these cars apart. Then there is the Navigator with it’s double chin front massive grille, huge slabs of chrome everywhere and overdone exterior. I think we have seen onough of the plain slabsided, overbloated squinty windowed, massive over sized grille cars of this dreadful decade to last a lifetime. Hire some new designers guys. Your current ones suck! Oh and get some V8′s in your blandmobiles while your at it.

  • avatar
    joeaverage

    Saw one this morn at a lot. BIG grille. Alot like the cow catcher on the front of a “locomotive of yore”. Not a bad looking vehicle. Looks alot like my in-laws Saturn Outlook in profile. I thought how typical. Copy each other’s products. Then I saw a Toyota Venza (?) at lunch. Looked alot like them too. Obviously some sort of tread towards huge SUV/crossover vehicles. Yawn…

    I’d rather have a quality minivan with sporty styling and handling and long lasting durability. Have it on standby for whole family hauling. Daily drivers would still have to be smaller and sportier.

    I’m a secure heterosexual male!!! LOL!

  • avatar
    davey49

    “Someone who is looking for a crossover does not want a minivan.”
    That someone is an idiot and needs to be forced to look at minivans when shopping. It means they have a mental illness. If you have need for 3 rows of seating than you should be shopping minivans.

  • avatar
    Impala 64

    Eh gats!

    Nary a positive word and the honda oddesy reigns supreme.
    What kind of bizzaro site did I stumble into.

    The small pud that did the review knows luxury, eh…
    a definition to him that more than likely means when he upgrades to 2 ply toilet paper prior to sitting on his hemeroid ring while writing this crap.

    This was like walking into a city with a population of thousands of roger eberts, who’s utterly worthless opinion about movies, (or, in this case cars), typically means that if they “hated it” then chances are good that it is exactly the one you should watch, or drive.

    Patetic.

  • avatar
    bbqueen

    Don’t Knock It Till You Try It!!
    Are these reviews for real, this car is loaded with every feature imaginable. It’s every child’s dream come true. Who cares about how it looks on the outside, it’s what’s on the inside that counts :0)

    Pros:
    -Plush perforated leather heated and cooled front and back seats
    -all 6 seats are captain chairs/bucket seats
    -middle row features a centre row console which contains a refrigerator/freezer, cup holders and storage area with things like USB ports and a 3 prong plug.
    - reverse backup camera with parking assist/ warning
    - navigation with DVD sync and my lincoln touch
    - really cool ambient lighting that lights up the whole front and back flooring of the car as well as around the cup holders and door handles, can choose many different colors the kids love it.
    - oodles of safety features like blind spot alert, collision warning front and back as well as cross traffic alert warning/
    -auto parking which means if you have to parallel park . the car will find a spot where it can fit and will back up and perfectly parallel park itself, hands free and perfect parking every time!!
    -huge double sunroof almost the whole roof is glass
    - adaptive cruise control, couldn’t live without it
    - power folding seats that stow and fold and flip up with push of a button, even the middle row sitting flips forward to let 3row passengers in with a push of a button.
    - 3rd row seats flip backwards into tailgate position so kids can sit and watch their siblings football game from the comfort of the trunk, and the trunk door acts as a sun visor/ rain shade , another one of my kids favorite features.
    - back windows have retractable sun blinds/ shades for backseat passengers.
    - incredibly smooth luxurious ride
    -amazing sound system and memory to store 2000 songs
    -the list goes on and on too many to list

    Cons
    - heavy back doors

    Best 2010 family car out there and by far the coolest, please don’t listen to these comments, your kids will be thrilled and so will you, everyone that steps foot in this car says wow I need one!!


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