By on October 2, 2009

Der kleine krokodil

It’s difficult to put a price on cynicism in this day and age, but allow me to make a suggestion: $13,900. Four years ago, the newly-introduced Porsche Cayman 3.4S retailed for $58,900. The mechanically similar Boxster 2.7 was $45K flat. That nearly fourteen-grand price difference would have purchased a well-equipped Hyundai Elantra, but at Porsche it got the Cayman buyer a hardtop, which costs less to manufacture than the Boxster’s soft top, and a bored-out engine, which costs exactly the same to make as the small-bore variant.

Although Porsche did condescend to sweeten the crocodile pot with a few extras, such as larger brakes and a more aggressive wheelset, it’s still difficult to not consider the Cayman as the most cynical marketing exercise in history. Of course, Porsche is a company that keeps resetting the bar for cynical exploitation of its overly devoted customers. This mid-engined two-seater is simply another profit-laden reassembly of Stuttgart’s depressingly low-quality watercooled LEGO set, sold for twice what a comparable Japanese or American car would cost.

_MG_5507These are the thoughts that fill my mind as I open the door to PRI’s mildly tuned Cayman S. I’ve just gotten out of their Z4M, a fabulous but flawed roadster that oozes style and enthusiasm from every pore. The Porsche, by contrast, is a boring grey pod with a clattery-sounding frameless door. The old aircooled 911s used to “ting” when the doors closed. It was a solid reminder of the way Porsches used to be built. No longer. The interior is bland, cost-cut, uninteresting. Cynical. Cheap. And then it’s time to drive.

While the Z4 driver sits over the rear axle, looking down the long bonnet in a seating position older than the MG TC, the Cayman’s pilot is cab-forward, with just a mild suggestion of headlamp tunnel visible through the chop-top windshield. It’s not an inspiring view, but it offers uncompromised vision for the driver. Stuff like that matters when you’re pedaling three hundred horsepower down fast roads.

Those ponies, incidentally, are delivered in rather begrudging fashion. There’s nothing even remotely special about the Cayman’s engine. If you want a sensual, exciting Porsche motor, write a check and buy a GT3. The “regular” cars are toneless at low revs and offer just a smidgen of aural excitement as the center-mounted tach passes the italicized “6”. It isn’t a droning Japanese four or hopelessly tacky V-6, but it’s very far from the characterful monster that used to live behind the rear axle of Nine Elevens.

At seventy miles per hour, the BMW has it all over the Porsche. Law-abiding citizens, or the seven-tenths trackday crowd, should feel no regret over purchasing a Z4 over a Cayman, particularly given the solid economic incentives for doing so. In a straight line, the Porsche inevitably slips backwards, and the balky cable shifter doesn’t help matters. It wouldn’t have cost a dime more to make this car a 405-horsepower 3.8, and I find myself repeatedly cursing the name of the now-disgraced Dr. Wendelin Wiedeking as we climb the mountainous roads around upstate New York.

Before I know it, though, the roads start becoming a bit… challenging. Wide sweepers tighten without warning as the short-scale speedometer hovers past the one-half mark. The Z4 is falling out of its element, but the Cayman just keeps getting better. It could use more front tire — every current production Porsche is shipped with a ridiculous amount of “stagger” between the front and rear tread — but the available grip can be accessed right up to the limit. In the midcorner, with the PSM babysitter disconnected, there is a reliable, predictable slide from the tail. I’m adding power at the apex while the BMW is still fidgeting and fussing for grip.Worth it after all?

As the miles stretch on, the Cayman maintains a firm brake pedal. Porsche may cut costs everywhere they can, but they have never cut costs when it comes to stopping the car. I’m braking later and later, trusting the car more, and now the Bimmer ahead of me is a fly to be swatted away at my convenience. I can’t do it under power, but at any racetrack I’d show the nose at the next corner and make it stick. The steering is preternaturally good despite power assistance, revealing every line in the pavement but absorbing the worst of the bumps and vibrations before they reach the steering wheel.

As fate would have it, a month after driving PRI’s car I had a chance to drive a nearly identical example at Summit Point’s Main course. In a group filled with M3s, STis, and Evolutions, the Cayman was a subtle superstar, gaining ground in every turn and in every braking zone, never falling too far back, eventually bringing us to the front of the session. A Z4M might have accomplished the same thing, but it would have been a struggle. Like it or not, the Cayman is a truly great car. It isn’t “worth the money” by any scale I can devise, but I’d write a check for one and never think twice.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

42 Comments on “Nearly New Germans Comparo: First Place: Porsche Cayman S...”


  • avatar
    TZ

    Apples to oranges. Compare the S models, and it’s obviously a lot closer, with the Boxster/Cayman difference being roughly $3,500. A Boxster S costs $10,000 more than a base Boxster.

    Complaining about the price difference between Boxster base and Cayman S models is like complaining that the Taurus SHO costs more than the base.

  • avatar
    highrpm

    Jack, I agree with your story but not the conclusion. Like you said, the car looks and feels like it’s gone through a lot of cost-cutting. No Boxster or Cayman has been immune from that feel. I don’t mind that feeling in a commuter car, but this is a $60k Porsche.

    The air cooled 911s felt expensive. Remember the coilover setup, from the factory, on the 964? Awesome! Today you get Volkswagen struts, a cheap interior, and a ho-hum engine.

    It’s a nice $30k car with a $30k badge on it.

  • avatar
    Kristjan Ambroz

    Finally someone who does not prostrate themselves before the brand, claiming their interiors are oh so special :)

    Also completely agree about the sound – while not unpleasant or anything, when a friend replaced his with an NSX, one came in for another league of aural pleasure in comparison.

  • avatar
    NickR

    At that price (my keeping in mind that’s US dollars) it’s a rip off. Really.

  • avatar
    Chicago Dude

    So at what price does a used Cayman become worth every penny?

  • avatar
    twotone

    Nice car, but my money goes to the M3 — fun on the track, comfortable every day driver and works for taking three of my friends out to dinner on a Saturday night.

    Twotone

  • avatar
    Stingray

    Kristjan Ambroz :

    Finally someone who does not prostrate themselves before the brand, claiming their interiors are oh so special :)

    It’s obvious you haven’t read his reviews before.

    But yes, it’s “refreshing”…

  • avatar

    The Cayman / Boxster is the only case I can think of where the hardtop costs more than the convertible. Quite ridiculous, especially since they’ve become almost identical in other respects in recent years.

    The engine note has become a bit more interesting in recent years. The base Boxster engine used to sound downright pedestrian. But the sound of exotic machinery remains absent. This was perhaps my greatest disappointment when driving these cars.

    I don’t think ANYONE has ever praised the interiors of these cars. That said, the refresh was an improvement.

    An M3 is a fine handling coupe / sedan, but no coupe or sedan handles like a good sports car. People who say otherwise either don’t know what they’re talking about or rationalizing.

    Stephan Wilkinson posted a few months ago about engine failures in earlier model years of these cars. TrueDelta might have some reliability stats for the Boxster in November. 275 Boxster and Cayman owners signed up to participate in the Car Reliability Survey so far.

    http://www.truedelta.com/reliability.php

  • avatar

    I’ve driven two of them, an auto-equipped Cayman, and a manual Cayman S. Both were on public roads with fairly high traffic density, so extra-legal performance driving opportunities were limited. That said however I found them to be the best handling cars I’ve ever driven. Their interiors were loaded with annoyances, and the noises in the cockpit were unbearable at times, but they were still a joy to drive.

    –chuck

  • avatar
    imag

    Great review.

    I was cross-shopping a used Cayman S when I bought my 370Z, and I was stunned at the two things you brought up: the shifter and the interior. The former just didn’t seem very sporting (although front-transmission cars always have the advantage on tight shifters), and the latter didn’t remotely live up to what I expected a Porsche should be – it actually felt very Japanese.

    Ultimately, I couldn’t fit well in the Cayman (knees, meet dash, fight), and I couldn’t enjoy the snobbery of the Porsche dealer, so I got the 370, but I will give the Porsche credit on the finesse. I will also allow that, unlike the Porsche, the 370 needs an oil cooler and brake pads to go on the track (my $3K non-option), and unfortunately weighs almost 500(!) more L.B.Ses.

    Anyway, it’s a shame Porsche won’t let the car run with the big dogs. It’s an amazing chassis. For the money in new cars, the Exige would take it for me, but I certainly don’t begrudge the Cayman a thing. I wish Porsche wouldn’t begrudge it a good interior and a larger motor option.

    A GT3 Cayman would approach automotive nirvana (if I could &#@!ing fit in one).

  • avatar

    I’ll agree with that the interior is total crap and the handling is stellar.

    I completely disagree with the styling comments. The Cayman is good looking. The Z4 is a baguette that was chopped off in the middle.

    Of course the real tragedy is how the Cayman has been hobbled to preserve the 911s position in the hierarchy. A position which grows more untenable as time passes – there is just a limit on how far you can take a rear engined car over a mid-engined one. A Cayman GT3 would be an incredible car. It is a good thing that VW/Audi managed to reverse on Porsche and buy them if only because Porsche would have killed the R8.

  • avatar
    ellomdian

    So the Porsche wins because it has more potential when you really thrash it? Even though the interior is shabby, the engine will probably explode before you sell it, and the original price premium still stands over a boxster?

    I like the Cayman. But I still don’t see how in the “gently used” category the BMW doesn’t just thrash it.

  • avatar
    mpresley

    This mid-engined two-seater…sold for twice what a comparable Japanese or American car would cost… Like it or not, the Cayman is a truly great car. It isn’t “worth the money” by any scale I can devise, but I’d write a check for one and never think twice.

    Sorry Jack, but there’s something different about Porsches. You know that. Complaining that a Porsche isn’t Japanese is almost like wondering why your aunt isn’t your uncle. Sure, they’re both relatives, but different–very different. You’ve really got to want to own a German car. That’s the way it’s always been, and that’s the way it will (most likely) continue to be. Appealing to anything sensible or practical just won’t do. Sure, all of this excludes those who can’t (or won’t) pay, but that’s what they make Japanese cars for anyway.

  • avatar
    chuckR

    964 coil-overs were nice, but I traded an 17 year old 964 C4 variant 911 because the AWD system, if it failed, would require repairs that approached the car’s value. Porsche first gen AWD was based on the 959 set-up and was complicated and expensive – $5k parts cost for wheel sensors for example. I miss the sound the engine made, no question. But I now have a CPO’ed Cayman S – about 30% off MSRP at one year old and started with 5 years and 88000 miles CPO warranty. Doubt I’d have bought it new, though.

    re: engines blowing up. From fevered reading of various websites, what emerged for me was that there were a couple of indicators. One, track the thing with race tires and the oil runs away and hides, only to be whipped up into a froth by the rotating parts and that doesn’t lubricate very well. The chassis is much better than the engine. Porsche at its discretion will void the warranty for engine failure while using track tires. Fix might be a much larger capacity oil/vapor separator – $1k part plus hours of fun installing it. But the track guys often tear down at 50 hours anyway. Second indicator, run the oil in stop and go traffic to the original 20000 mile (srsly) change interval and the IMS bearing goes kaflooie from contamination and breakdown of the grease and oil additives. Porsche upgraded that bearing by 75% capacity for the Caymans and newer Boxsters, but it still may not be enough. Still, SOP for Porsche. That 964? They didn’t bother putting o-rings between the case and the heads – had to remove the engine and machine in some grooves and install the o-rings. Warranty thank goodness. Bad damped flywheel design that spilled hydraulic fluid all over the clutch – that one was all mine. You can go back further and find out about dilavar head studs, etc, but Porsches have always had surprises that you wouldn’t put up with in most cars.

    Why do I have it? You don’t need to get to Baruth-a-hoon levels of performance to appreciate the handling. And that supposed power deficit can be fixed with a TPC Racing low pressure turbo – 5.5psi gets you to 420rwhp…. A Cayman is not the car for the guy who can’t afford a 911, its for the guy who can’t afford a GT3….

  • avatar
    carguy

    There is no doubt that the Cayman is one of the great drivers cars you can get but the value equation just doesn’t add up. You can buy a two year old standard Cayman in the low to mid $30s and for that its great value.

    The base S cost more than a new M3 and for that kind of cash I’ll vote for the M3.

  • avatar
    BostonDuce

    The interior (and exterior) of any Porsche can be very “$pecial”.

    The problem is, it takes $5-8K to get it near trim and equipment levels of say a comparable BMW/Audi.
    Even dealer stock seems to have $8-12K of optional equipment.

    You have the potential to equip a car with such obscure trim bits as leather turn signal stalks, carbon fiber kick panel trim, and colored seat belts. No other manufacture of main-stream sleds lets you do that. This next step could end up costing another $15-20K on top of your first round with the option list. Today, your well equipped Cayman S will top $90,000.

    Of course, when and if you want to sell it, you would have done better putting your money with Bernie Madoff. Nobody wants to pay for a high optioned used Porsche, on the other hand, they don’t want to buy a used ‘stripper’ either.

    The internet blogs are full of arseholes that brag they got a “high optioned” car for the price of an Accord. Good luck to them when their intermediate shaft blows a baseball-sized hole through their engine block, or their rear main seal dumps an Exxon Valdez oil slick on their garage floor. Their full carbon trim that they ‘stole’ won’t help them now.

    Either way, track car, or cruiser your going to pay the price. If you want a cheap sporty car, by a f’n used Civic and put slicks and a fart pipe on it and quit whining.

    BD

    PS. The Cayman in the article is a “S” the Boxter comparo is not- that difference alone is $10,000 (back then the Cayman was only a “S” car). Car for car the difference is now about $4000 more for a Cayman

  • avatar
    jaje

    “It wouldn’t have cost a dime more to make this car a 405-horsepower 3.8, and I find myself repeatedly cursing the name of the now-disgraced Dr. Wendelin Wiedeking as we climb the mountainous roads around upstate New York.” – Is this fact? If so where is the source? I get bored when I read pure speculation made to look like fact. Discredits the writer and their opinion even faster.

  • avatar
    DearS

    Finesse is a pretty cool thing. The Cayman I’m sure does cools things cars costing twice as much don’t. I mean few sports cars weight 3000bls now a day. Most seem to cost more. That being said, I’d like to drive one first.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Jack, I heard a rumor you’re going away…please dont. This is a terrific review.

  • avatar
    SunnyvaleCA

    Aside from the huge array of tiny buttons on the center stack, what don’t people like about the Cayman S interior? As for the feel of the 6-speed manual transmission, order option XCZ (“sport shifter”) or buy the factory part for $450 and install it yourself.

    By the way, the remaining brand new 2008 Cayman S vehicles are going for under $50k, including options. That’s for a car with $66k MSRP. Some people pay more than that for a 335i.

  • avatar
    TZ

    BostonDuce :
    October 2nd, 2009 at 2:13 pm

    PS. The Cayman in the article is a “S” the Boxter comparo is not- that difference alone is $10,000 (back then the Cayman was only a “S” car). Car for car the difference is now about $4000 more for a Cayman

    I pointed that out earlier this morning and my comment was “moderated”. There was exactly nothing in my comment to warrant moderation. I simply stated that the difference in base and S models is roughly $10,000, making the comparison between a Cayman S and a base Boxster apples to oranges.

    Curious, to say the least.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Wait, what, a Cayman? I was sure the winner was going to be a TT or SLK!

    Not.

  • avatar
    porschespeed

    Sadly, as long as the 911 is kept alive the Cayman will never reach it’s potential.

    One of these days, the few people in Porsche that keep the 911 alive will be retire/die.

    It’s a shame how much of Porsche’s real and intellectual capital has been wasted keeping the “icon” on the road.

    The 911 must die so that Porsche may move into the future.

    (yeah, I got my Nomex on…)

  • avatar

    @TZ, @BostonDuce: Dunno why you got moderated but if you read the article it’s plain that I address the difference between normal and “S” trim in the first few paragraphs.

    @jaje: The Boxster 2.7 and the 3.8X51 are fundamentally the same engines. One is bored and stroked, obviously. It’s possible that Mahle charges Porsche more for the 3.8 pistons; it’s also possible that it costs more to bore out the holes on the 3.8, but in a mass-production situation the cost difference would be negligible and very possibly absorbed by the lower costs possible if all the waterboxers were built to the same specification.

  • avatar
    akitadog

    My best man got me a manual Cayman S for 24 hours before my wedding. As fun as it was to drive, I just could not get over the extremely annoying vacuum cleaner sucking sound coming from behind me. It was more pronounced in traffic, but I live in DC. That could get tiring VERY easily.

  • avatar
    SatinTypeS

    Jack.

    I am a Korean American shareholder and executive. I have been watching you bash Koreans/Japanese for some time now, and I must tell you that I am becoming very interested in learning more about you.

    Don’t post anything that you wouldn’t say to me face to face Jack. I’ll be watching.

  • avatar
    jonnyguitar

    I have to take issue with those who compare the cayman/boxster (911;)) interior to an econobox. It is def no frills, but it feels distinctly German, totally different from the feel of an Asian make.

    Compared to a 350/370Z, there is no comparison, the boxster/cayman is a much more balanced and enjoyable machine.

    I also have a 08 M3. Great car, but I usually prefer the boxster due to better balance, more man/machine synergy.

  • avatar
    dgduris

    Great write-up Jack!

    I’ll stick with an STI and spend the change on good wines.

  • avatar
    bigmiles70

    Imagine sitting in traffic in your first place Cayman S and a 911 pulls up next to you? How would that may you feel, Jack? Wishing you could afford the 911? That’s the problem with this car. It will always be a second place car.

    “In a group filled with M3s, STis, and Evolutions, the Cayman was a subtle superstar, gaining ground in every turn and in every braking zone, never falling too far back, eventually bringing us to the front of the session. A Z4M might have accomplished the same thing, but it would have been a struggle.”

    What you consider a struggle, Jack, others would consider exciting and stimulating. Dare I say it?
    not boring!….

  • avatar
    chuckR

    bigmiles70

    If envy of what the next person is driving is a factor, you’ll likely never be happy. GM institutionalized such a ranking, Porsche and others certainly cultivate it.

  • avatar
    rcolayco

    hello jack b.

    like you, i am a multi-porsche owner (cayenne turbo, 996 turbo, 997 gt3 & ruf rt12, all currently owned). i’d like to add my 2 cents’ worth to this chat.

    when a friend took his z4m to the track, his front brakes smoked after a half-dozen hard laps — overheated fluid flowed beneath his car, accompanied by acrid odor & of course, seriously diminished stopping performance. never happened to his or any of our group’s 911s. . . & none of them have been fitted with upgraded brakes.

    i was excited by the z4m coupe’s looks when i saw it at the paris auto show in 2006 & test-drove it soon afterwards. not nearly as quick as any of my 911s of course, but i very nearly replaced the 996 turbo with it. however, i yielded to my son’s vehement objections, a decision i’ve sometimes wistfully regretted. the z4m is a crude drive compared to the porsches, but i found it very entertaining for that. in addition, its unorthodox styling & truly compact dimensions somehow strikes a strong chord (sigh).

    and now, to ‘fess up — i recently acquired a corvette z06 & delivered my 996 turbo to its new owner soon afterwards (sigh). what i’m about to say will probably arouse much indignation from some of our fellow gear heads, but here goes. . . the z06 is obviously quicker than my old turbo & is in that respect a more exciting drive. with some time at its wheel, i’ve begun to have a sense of its genuinely deep reserves of both speed & handling capabilities. . . the difference is, after a day’s driving the ‘vette, i’m quietly satisfied to directly head for home & park it in the garage. . . unlike any of the 911s (yes, even the slower ones), in which i’ll literally want to take the long way home. will this change as i become even more familiar with the ‘vette? it could, who knows?

    finally, i believe that things such as the quality of switches & door-handles ought not be a big deal. one buys these things for the pleasure of driving. i could for instance complain of the “cheap” leather interior of the z06, but why? i in fact specified a very plain interior for the rt12 — cloth seat pads & body-colored paint on the dash. others asked for very plush quilted leaher, the sort found in ferraris. these are in the end very subjective choices & more importantly, they are peripheral to the driving experience provided by the car.

    in the end, that’s why i replaced the 996 turbo with the z06. although each of the three 911s had a distinct driving character from the other, the ‘vette provides a broader contrast.

  • avatar
    stevenm

    Imagine sitting in traffic in your first place Cayman S and a 911 pulls up next to you? How would that may you feel, Jack? Wishing you could afford the 911? That’s the problem with this car. It will always be a second place car.

    If you’re going to shamelessly rip off Jeremy Clarkson’s review of the Cayman, why not at least cite him?

  • avatar
    onerareviper

    Imagine sitting in traffic in your first place Cayman S and a 911 pulls up next to you? How would that may you feel, Jack? Wishing you could afford the 911? That’s the problem with this car. It will always be a second place car.

    If I drove a Cayman S and felt it was a superior driving experience to the 911, I would feel great! Like I made the smart purchase & saved $17,000. Who wouldn’t? All but the very insecure.

    Now if I felt the 911 was a better driving experience, I would probably just penny-pinch for a while so I could afford what I wanted…. It’s not like these two cars are that far apart in price. MSRP of a Cayman S is $60,000, and the 911 Carrera Coupe (345HP) is about $77,000. Only $17,000 difference. News flash: If you can afford 60 g’s on a new car, 17 g’s more is probably do-able.

  • avatar
    rcolayco

    I have to agree with onerareviper – absolutely no reason at all to apologize for driving a Cayman rather than a 911. It’s an inherently superior design. For me, the ONLY reason I don’t drive a Cayman is that I like to have lots of power AND that unique feel that only a 911 provides.

    Funny thing about the Cayman S being relatively under-powered . . . at the Nurburgring where I drove a friend’s Cayman S, I realized that I couldn’t compensate (which in reality, you really aren’t doing) for going into a curve on the wrong line by using the engine’s power to get out of the turn quickly. The Cayman simply didn’t have the grunt to let you do that. And because of that, it’s a better car in which to learn to drive quickly.

    On the other hand, the Cayman allows you to attack the course with a bit more aggression if only because it’s more forgiving. You don’t owe your survival to PSM as much as you do in a 911.

    Now back to the 911 — I suspect it’s that nagging knowledge at the back of your mind — the knowledge that at a certain point, even with all the 40 years of chassis development built into the car, you WILL cross the point at which you’ve literally violated the laws of physics & that lump of metal behind the axle will have its way and swing the car around, that makes for a unique driving experience.

    I sometimes liken 911 aficionados to the fugu connoisseurs of Japan. They sometimes ask the expert chef to cut ever closer to the liver, till at some point a few of them die from poisoning. It’s actually more mundane than that I think. Somehow, even as Porsche’s engineers have refined the chassis to the point where you really have to be irresponsible to get in trouble, the inherent tendency of the severe rear weight bias must create a tension that translates into that unique feel that you have to experience to understand what all this drivel is all about.

  • avatar
    blowfish

    I thought any drop head/rag top should cost more to build. As they need extra bracing for the chassis or frame.
    Or in this case a Porsche hasn’t got as much torque as a Chebby Camaro or Vette. As u step on both the brake & gas pedal u twist the frame. A bloke told me his stock old Camaro did crack the windshield because of the flexing of the frame. Later yrs they had to beef up the frame or keep popping the windshield.

    Now the next question as why not make these to crank out 405 HP, is encroaching into the Holy holy territory of 911. Just like in the old days of 914/6 or the 912 which is almost the price of a real 911. It was 500 or so difference.
    30 yrs ago that was a princely sum.

  • avatar
    porschespeed

    A bloke told me his stock old Camaro did crack the windshield because of the flexing of the frame. Later yrs they had to beef up the frame or keep popping the windshield.

    Uhh, that’s becuase they were utter POS’s. C6 has more HP and TQ than any of those so-called ‘muscle cars’. Not that the beetle-evo isn’t inherently a design disaster as well, but it’s a highly polished turd…

    @rcolayco,

    Congrats on being one of about 12 uberbeetle owners I’ve ever met in my life that have the cojones to admit the 911 is an inherently flawed design. If we only had a time machine and could go back and have the master pimp-slap Butzi back to reality when he hung the engine off the ass-end. The stupid things parents let their kids do…

  • avatar
    blowfish

    These pancake boxers do leak when they get older.

    My bro’s car the a/c switch died, it will cost him 2 grand to have it fixed.
    He wired a plug into the 12 ciggy lighter outlet and when he needs cool air he plugs it in.
    That was his older aircooled. Atleast the engine didnt gave up its Ghost.
    His newer water buffalo actually had the engine failed just after 6 mths. These engine kaputs were discussed here before. It came to a grinding halt one day, atleast is not embarrased as died in a race!
    The dealer kind of knew it could happen and wasn’t surprised, only too happy to gave him a new engine.
    If it were any of the big 3 service rep, they would have questioned him worse than the Gestapo or KGB.

    The owner of our local Porsche dealer had a little tryst with a Lexus & the Law.
    If he can’t convince the court he could have lots of time on his hands to write Mein Kempf II.

    http://www.globaltvbc.com/world/Billionaire+Vancouver+businessman+David+faces+criminal+charges/2043439/story.html

  • avatar
    rcolayco

    Thanks, porschespeed.

    Doesn’t really take cojones to acknowledge that the 911 is inherently flawed. But I guess actually LIKING the thing because of the inherent flaw takes what, being weird I guess?

    As you must have noted, I’ve theorized that it’s precisely that very design flaw which imparts a unique driving experience to the car. I suspect the pendulum effect that arises from the 911′s engine location, tamed much better by the Porsche engineers to a degree that many would consider impossible had it not been done, creates a “tension” which in turn produces that unique 911 feel.

    As much as I admire the fine balance of the Cayman, it’s not quite as nice to drive. Alois Ruf let me drive his RK coupe (Italian bodied Cayman with 3.8 liter supercharged engine producing 440 hlp). It was nice but lacked something, so it’s not just lack of power. Comparing the 911 to the Cayman, I’d say it’s like having tacos with and without jalapenos.

    Oh well, enough of this.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    SatinTypeS : I have been watching you bash Koreans/Japanese for some time now, and I must tell you that I am becoming very interested in learning more about you.

    Don’t post anything that you wouldn’t say to me face to face Jack. I’ll be watching.

    I’ve seen a number of keyboard warriors on the internet, but you might be the first keyboard ninja I’ve come across!

  • avatar
    mkirk

    The Cayman / Boxster is the only case I can think of where the hardtop costs more than the convertible. Quite ridiculous, especially since they’ve become almost identical in other respects in recent years.

    Solstice

  • avatar

    akitadog :
    My best man got me a manual Cayman S for 24 hours before my wedding. As fun as it was to drive, I just could not get over the extremely annoying vacuum cleaner sucking sound coming from behind me. It was more pronounced in traffic, but I live in DC. That could get tiring VERY easily.

    akitadog,

    That wasn’t the car. That was NAFTA. And living in DC does get tiring very easily. That’s why I left.

  • avatar
    onerareviper

    The Cayman / Boxster is the only case I can think of where the hardtop costs more than the convertible. Quite ridiculous, especially since they’ve become almost identical in other respects in recent years.

    Dodge Viper, but only about a $1,000 difference.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • J & J Sutherland, Canada
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India