By on October 20, 2009

m35x

Luxury sport sedans have a lot of boxes to tick. In a segment where high price points have not prevented a a crowd of competitors from gathering, every contender must develop a unique identity that sets it apart from the pack. This means a combination of performance, character, quality and feel that makes the car’s priorities evident, and speaks to the tastes of its well-heeled driver. Instead of picking a specific formula, the M35x tried too hard to check all the boxes, leaving it almost completely without distinguishing characteristics. The upside is an almost utilitarian soullessness, an anonymous competence that defines much of the front-drive luxury market. In this group though, we’re looking for more than that. The Infiniti’s driving experience comes across as a pastiche of other, more memorable cars, and this lack of identity drops the M to last place.

At first glance, there’s little to disappoint, but little to excite, either. The M was clearly styled in the Mercedes idiom: more impressive than alluring, particularly dressed in black metallic. The basic shape is blocky and slab-sided, with a pronounced wedge shape and more chrome bling than you’d find on a whole fleet of 5-series BMWs. Overall, the look is aggressive and imposing, and the workmanship impresses, but the M’s styling just doesn’t leave a lasting impression – curious, given that other Infiniti products, particularly the sleek G sedan and coupe, are stylish and overflowing with design personality.

Once inside, the M again makes a decent impression. The dashboard is a two-tiered affair: a dark upper panel and light-colored lower panel separated by a dash-wide swath of unique-looking African rosewood.  Entry and exit are the best in this test, aided by the M’s tall roof line and a system that moves the seat and steering wheel in and out of the driver’s way for ingress and egress. The seats themselves are wide and comfortable, if not terribly supportive. The workmanship is good, but the materials are a mixed bag – the leather and wood trim is of obviously high quality, but many interior materials, such as the door padding, look slightly downmarket at this price.

m35xinteriorThe driver interfaces with a nicely padded wheel, and instrumentation is beautifully rendered and highly legible. Like its German competitors, the M has a multifunction wheel (think iDrive) to control, well, just about everything. These controls can be finicky to use, but at least Infiniti places the controls high on the dashboard, in the driver’s line of sight, mitigating the ergonomic impact of the system. The aesthetics are another matter – all those buttons under the LCD navigation / radio screen make it look as if a miniature laptop computer has been grafted into the dashboard. It’s not a look for all tastes, and this writer found it decidedly awkward.

The equipment level is hard to argue with – the M came fully stocked with toys, including ventilated front seats, a hard drive-based multimedia system, voice-activated audio and climate controls, an excellent Bose sound system, and a DVD audio and video system. Other gadgets were a bit too gimmicky, such as the lane-departure warning system, which beeps at you when you’re straying too far out of your lane. Frustratingly, it can’t be turned off.

Keeping with its utilitarian theme, the M35 excels as a people mover. It offers the largest and most comfortable back seat in this test, and a massive, well-shaped trunk. But then so does an Avalon.

The M35 is powered by the latest iteration of Infiniti’s ever-present 3.5 liter V-6, putting out a class-acceptable 303 horsepower. Like the Lexus, this engine loves to rev, and puts out a fairly aggressive howl, but the M’s curb weight – over 4,000 pounds – and willing but cog-limited 5-speed automatic mean you have to truly flog the engine to drive enthusiastically. Subjectively, the M felt slower than the Mercedes, but the engine felt more eager and made more encouraging noises. The 7-speed transmission, available in the rear-drive M, would help, but what would really make the difference here is the 324-horsepower, direct injected V-6 in the G37 sedan.m35xback

Handling-wise, the M35 fares better. Among the Japanese luxury brands, Infinti has been chasing BMW for quite some time, and this car shows they’ve been learning along the way. The M is not as overtly sporting as the BMW in this test, but a lot of the ingredients are there: direct, communicative steering, solid structure, and a firm but compliant chassis. As a result, the M35 responds eagerly to hard driving, and rewards the driver with an open line of communication with the road. But here’s where the underpowered V-6 undercuts the M35 yet again – as eager and competent as this car is over the road, it never feels effortlessly fast, and that’s a deal killer in this class.

This car is also available with a 325-horsepower V-8 – the M45 – and with that engine, it would have been a better match for the BMW and Audi, but thus equipped, the M was far from revelatory to drive, and wouldn’t have placed any higher than fourth in this test. And if the BMW stretches the price envelope here, the M45 would have blown it away with a sticker pushing $63,000. As tested, the M35 came in at a far more reasonable $54,965, and that seems the more sensible way to go.

And that sensibility explains why the M35 finishes last here. While the Infiniti is undeniably well-rounded, competent, and a solid value, those are common-sense attributes, and when you’re dropping this kind of money on a car, it shouldn’t be a sensible purchase – it should be an extravagance, a treat. A car that, in one way or another, simply blows you away. Each of the cars in this test offer that in their own fashion, each is a unique melange of performance and character that give shape to an identifiable personality. Except the M35, which other than geeky streak, shows almost no personality at all. In this segment, that’s an unforgivable sin.

Performance: 2/5
Engine is willing, but it feels underpowered, and the transmission needs more cogs

Ride: 3/5
Comfortable without being too mushy

Handling: 4/5
Feels eager, with quick, direct steering; too bad the engine intrudes on the fun

Exterior: 3/5
Impressive, but doesn’t really have its own style

Interior: 3/5
Roomiest in test, with some unique stylistic touches, but some subpar materials and the odd center stack do not impress

Fit and Finish: 3/5
Notably well made, but some interior materials are not up to snuff

Toys: 5/5
It’s hard to think of a gadget this car doesn’t have

Desirability: 1/5
Just not much to get excited about here.

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51 Comments on “Import Sport Sedan Comparison: Sixth Place: Infiniti M35x...”


  • avatar
    sean362880

    Agree that there’s no good reason to buy one new. There are too many good alternatives. Used, though, and M35 or M45 is a pretty good bargain. I reckon $20k off in the first year, down to sort of Toyota Avalon money. Which would you rather have?

  • avatar
    ZCD2.7T

    Drove this when it was first released – didn’t like it at all. (relatively) Noisy, unrefined, flinty ride. Not for me.

    Still, they sold TONS of ‘em, at least here around Chicago.

  • avatar
    John R

    The M35x, but not the M35(RWD) or M45? Interesting. If I see a 550i or some other non-AWD Bimmer in the forth coming entries I’m calling Shenanigans.

  • avatar

    I also drove one back in the first year. Like the seats, didn’t care for the ride or handling, and find the styling boring.

    The 2011 redesign looks somewhat like a Quattroporte, and will have more power. Looks good.

    Since this is the x, it doesn’t have the sport suspension option. That would improve the handling some, at the expense of ride quality.

    Based on responses to TrueDelta’s car reliability survey, the 2006 and 2007 M have been about average lately, and not far from “better than average.” Only a partial result for the 2007, and insufficient participants for 2008 on–sales took a big hit when the redesigned G was introduced.

    For information on the Car Reliability Survey, and to sign up to participate:

    http://www.truedelta.com/reliability.php

  • avatar

    John R:

    The Audi is obviously AWD, and I think it said the BMW was as well. So this comparison is smelling Audi-centric.

  • avatar

    You may have to re-run this test when the M37 and M56 come out.

  • avatar
    John R

    @Michael Karesh:

    Alright…I’ll call off the hounds…

  • avatar
    TZ

    And if the BMW stretches the price envelope here, the M45 would have blown it away with a sticker pushing $63,000.

    The M45 starts at $53,000.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    I’ve always really liked this car, and thought it rode and drove very well. I’m honestly surprised to see it finish last, but it was a long time ago that I’d driven it and maybe it hasn’t aged well. I do recall it being more overtly sporting than anything else in the class, but a little less sophisticated than the contemporary 5er.

    What I do miss the styling of the first-generation M. That was a nifty, kitschy car.

  • avatar
    jmo

    I reckon $20k off in the first year, down to sort of Toyota Avalon money.

    It comes with 7k+ on the hood brand new.

  • avatar
    jmo

    Had one as a company car for a while. The handeling was good, the engine was good, the toys were great, the ride quality just wasn’t good at all.

    I have friend with an Altima and I can’t say the ride in the M35 is any better. The ride in the E is spectacular and the ride in the 5 (last one I rode in didn’t have runflats) was firmer but still wounderous.

    I guess having a GTI and getting older I’m just done with firm riding cars.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    I remember driving a new version of this a number of years ago and being very impressed… but then, it was an M45 with sport suspension.

    I thought the interior was even more fussy then… too many buttons littered all over the place. It doesn’t look so bad anymore because of how many other cars have chosen to follow this silly trend.

  • avatar
    NickR

    Does Dell know that Infiniti is putting their computers in their cars?

    All joking aside, the middle of the dash looks ridiculous. Do people really use all those goddammed buttons? While in motion? Yikes.

  • avatar
    carguy

    I agree with Michael’s impressions of the car and the cliff-face depreciation also doesn’t help the ownership experience – you can pick up a low mileage certified 07 for the mid-20s. This car at $50K+ simply makes no financial sense.

  • avatar
    jmo

    All joking aside, the middle of the dash looks ridiculous. Do people really use all those goddammed buttons? While in motion? Yikes.

    Navigation, climate control and a radio – how many buttons are in your car?

  • avatar
    SLLTTAC

    For the M35x: reliability, toys, cost of ownership
    Against the M35x: ride, engine noise, ergonomics, interior

    On the other hand, the new M56 and M37 may trump all. How about an M56 with AWD, sport suspension, and sport seats? If the new Infiniti models have attractive interiors and prove to be reliable and at the same time fun to drive, well then…

  • avatar
    DearS

    I really like the when I was in the interior of one of these. I’m glad to here its a well rounded car too. The styling seems a bit misconstrued though, I try and try to see something nice, but I dont.

  • avatar
    SupaMan

    I’m probably in the minority, but I do like the styling of the M. I drove one during one of Infiniti’s events at the local auto show a few years back (M45 with the Sport Package) and I thought the ride and handling was on par with BMW’s 545i. The interior quality was pretty good although I do agree the center dash was a bit fussy with buttons everywhere.

    I’m really surprised to see it finish last, but then again others have elevated their game in the last few years.

  • avatar
    talkstoanimals

    Judging from the picture, the chrome exhaust tips tend to fall off of these cars.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    ohn R :
    October 20th, 2009 at 11:40 am

    The M35x, but not the M35(RWD) or M45? Interesting. If I see a 550i or some other non-AWD Bimmer in the forth coming entries I’m calling Shenanigans.

    Not to worry…the Bimmer is the 535xi. :)

    I probably should have explained this in the intro a little more thoroughly, but I live in Denver, and RWD versions of these cars are simply not around to test. The only exception is the Jaguar XF, which is not offered with AWD.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    TZ :
    October 20th, 2009 at 12:03 pm

    And if the BMW stretches the price envelope here, the M45 would have blown it away with a sticker pushing $63,000.

    The M45 starts at $53,000.

    …and with AWD and the toys required to compete in this test (nav, premium sound, etc), it comes in a tad shy of $63,000.

    The reason? Infiniti has a bad habit of lumping stuff you want (i.e., nav, premium sound) into packages with a lot of stuff you don’t, so you can’t add options ala carte. That accounts for the high price. Plus, there’s a $1,300 gas guzzler tax on the M45.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    RobD :
    October 20th, 2009 at 11:48 am

    You may have to re-run this test when the M37 and M56 come out.

    Hey, I live to serve… :)

  • avatar
    PG

    Am I the only one who thinks Infinitis are as boring as watching paint dry? I’m sure it’s a great car, but it just seems totally soulless to me. It doesn’t help that they all have that same 3.5-liter V6 that’s stuffed into every Nissan ever.

    I think Acuras have more personality than these cars, and that says something…

  • avatar
    speedboatsteve1

    Does anybody “purchase” these cars? I thought they were just leased by companies and whatnot – making depreciation somewhat irrelevant. Maybe the credit squeeze has nuked the corporate lease as well?

  • avatar
    jmo

    but it just seems totally soulless to me.

    I had a last generation FX for a while and it was something special. I also had an M35 and G35 and they were both like a less expensive Japanese BMW. I thought they totally had their own personality.

  • avatar
    mpresley

    …the lane-departure warning system, which beeps at you when you’re straying too far out of your lane. Frustratingly, it can’t be turned off.

    What exactly is this, and how does it work? Does it activate when changing lanes? I thought that was what those little reflecto hump-bumps in the asphalt were for. Weird

  • avatar
    jmo

    Does it activate when changing lanes?

    Only if you don’t use your turn signal. Personally I think there should be a system where if the driver fails to signal they get a beep followed but a mild electrical shock.

  • avatar
    mpresley

    jmo :Personally I think there should be a system where if the driver fails to signal they get a beep followed but a mild electrical shock.

    A very sensible idea. And, after the car is stopped and placed in park, the aforementioned involuntary current could be beefed up drastically, according to the extent of the infraction, just to drive home the point. A very sensible idea, indeed.

  • avatar
    George B

    Drove a 3 year old used M35 and G35 back-to-back. Both RWD. The G35 just felt right. The M35 was frustrating in that it took little pedal effort to get lots of brake action while the other controls were relatively slow to respond compared to the G35. Felt big and heavy with grabby brakes. I could eventually get used to driving an M35, but I couldn’t come up with a reason to pay more for a M35 when more enjoyable cars including the G35 are available for less money.

  • avatar
    meefer

    Soulless? You’ve never driven a Lexus ;-)

    Kidding aside, I’m a little surprised to not find the Lexus in last, unless there are seven entrants and I missed something.

    Got a chance to wing a M45 2 years back. Thought it was the natural big brother of a G. Big, broad shouldered, brute force kind of performance. Without the toys and with the depreciation, a real bargain these days if you can stand the styling. Kinda meh interior.

  • avatar

    “Personally I think there should be a system where if the driver fails to signal they get a beep followed but a mild electrical shock.”

    That device should be standard on ALL cars.

    Furthermore, the car’s computer should issue mild electrical shocks for:

    -driving below speed limit while using a cell phone
    -following too closely
    -still having spinning rims on your car
    -excessive aftermarket modifications
    -driving a Hummer
    -driving a Mini
    -driving a Nissan cube
    -driving anything made by Scion

  • avatar
    dean

    How about electrical shocks for S550 drivers?

  • avatar
    saponetta

    Desirability 1/5

    Spot on. all these japanese “luxury” cars have zero desirability in my opinion. Infiniti, lexus, acura, these cars are for dorks and wannabes. Every time is see some guy in couple year old TL with his shades and a temp tag, I throw up in my mouth a little. I have literally driven every highline model imaginable for at least a few days in a row from my dealership. These jap commodity luxury cars do not even approach their german competitors. I only purchase Audi, VW and Porsche products, but you can’t go wrong with any german manufacturer that fits your driving style and tastes.

  • avatar
    Jeff Puthuff

    I love my Japanese wannabe luxury car. I guess I’m a dork. I love driving past late-model BMWs parked on the side of the road with their hoods ajar. It’s happened three times in the last two months.

  • avatar

    dean :
    October 20th, 2009 at 7:16 pm
    How about electrical shocks for S550 drivers?

    It already comes with everything :P

  • avatar
    folkdancer

    I am enjoying your sport sedan comparisons but one of the things I consider in a car is “quiet” and that is not on your ratings list.

    I consider all the other things you rate but since I carpool I also like to hear what my passengers are saying.

  • avatar

    I’m with Jeff. I must be a dork too.

    I love my TSX. Granted, it doesn’t handle like a BMW, but I was thinking long term and in the 4 years I’ve owned it only the navigation system computer needed to be replaced.

    Anyways, I’ve always like the Ms, but I never see them on the road. The styling is just OK, but the interior is nicely done. There might be a lot of buttons, but there is also a touch screen if you prefer that input method.

    The current gen. is a huge improvement over the previous band-aid version that was rushed to marked, and what happened to the Q?

  • avatar
    imag

    The G37 doesn’t have direct injection yet. The current motor gets its extra oomph from VVEL and the extra 200 cubes. Direct injection is supposed to bring it up around 350.

  • avatar
    tonycd

    For God’s sake, saponetta, get over yourself.

    I test drove one of these a couple years ago. I’m also in that minority that thinks this is a beautiful car, inside and out.

    I’m not a connoisseur of the luxury class, so I’m probably too easy to impress with over-the-road behavior, but I thought the car exuded solidity and quality by my modest standards. What undid it, to me, was the combination of the 5-speed and the silly level of engine noise.

    If I remember right, Nissan deliberately pipes engine noise into the interior so it sounds “sporty.” But as a result, at highway speed the car drones constantly. To make matters much worse, the gearing on the 5-speed is absolutely asinine — there’s essentially no overdrive top gear, so at about 75 it’s over 3,000 RPM if I remember correctly. Owners report this absolutely murders the gas mileage, too. I guess you’re lucky if you’re over 19-20 mpg on the highway, real-world.

    The RL, before Acura smote it with the mother of all ugly sticks, was always a natural comparo for this car. I’ll be interested to see if it makes it into this test; I’m also among the minority that thinks the RL is (okay, was) grossly underrated.

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    That dash is ridiculous. I don’t mind the number of buttons – I prefer dedicated buttons for each function to having to navigate through menus to get your desired effect, but I don’t get the Nissan/Infiniti affinity for the two different angles. Perhaps it ends up being more ergonomic, but I’ve never driven one long enough to get used to it. I’d rather have all the controls on the same plane, or at least the same curve.

    I’m also not a fan at all of those MMI type wheels. Scroll wheels make sense for cell phones and PDAs where you have to navigate menus while also securing the device with your hand. With a nav screen you should have full touch functionality plus voice control for all key options, not a scroll wheel.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    This generation M has aged badly. It looks blocky and dull, the interior looks cheap, and the powertrains are no longer competitive.

    The upcoming M however looks like a knockout. Hugely improved interior and exterior styling, more power, and two more cogs in the gearbox should fix a lot of the Ms problems.

    I think even the current car is much better than the ugly, boring, and terrible to drive RL, and the cramped, soul crushing GS.

  • avatar

    Inifinity M’s strike me as “me too” cars playing second fiddle to BMW’s, Audi’s and Benzes.

    To call it “soul less” is a complement.

    There is nothing about this car that could make me aspire to own one or that could make me keep it.

  • avatar
    dolorean23

    The aesthetics are another matter – all those buttons under the LCD navigation / radio screen make it look as if a miniature laptop computer has been grafted into the dashboard.

    I remember a past issue of C&D where they pummeled the 2004 Pontiac Bonneville for having “over 88 tiny, separate buttons”. The dash for the M35 is extremely busy, never would have thought Infiniti wanted to emulate Pontiac.

  • avatar

    The M has always had the problem of not being as good as the G in a dynamic sense, but costing WAY more – for what? Some extra room? A V8 option that isn’t even much of an upgrade over the V6? It’s an orphan car in the lineup, trying to compete in the 5-series realm but not doing a very good job. You’d be much better off saving some dosh and getting a G37, if you can stand the lack of space.

    It’s much the same reason the Q45 was a failure. It was expensive, undefined and bland. It had cool gadgets and understated luxury but that’s not enough to compete (see Acura RL). They make great used bargains though, that’s why I own one.

  • avatar

    The wheel is indicative of the problem. The Germans have one, so we have to. But of course, since the wheel actually sucks as an interface, Infiniti went and fixed it by adding a ton of buttons. This, of course, meant instead of having lovely, simple to use controls, you now have a maze of buttons and a wheel.

    Sad that my Dad’s 1991 ES300 still has the easiest to use system with nice large buttons that I have ever seen.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    akatsuki :
    October 21st, 2009 at 8:41 pm

    The wheel is indicative of the problem. The Germans have one, so we have to. But of course, since the wheel actually sucks as an interface, Infiniti went and fixed it by adding a ton of buttons. This, of course, meant instead of having lovely, simple to use controls, you now have a maze of buttons and a wheel.

    Sad that my Dad’s 1991 ES300 still has the easiest to use system with nice large buttons that I have ever seen.

    In fairness: luxury cars have become far more complex and laden with gadgets since 1991. There are only two ways to keep up with that: 1) an IDrive style controller, or 2) lots of buttons on the dash. Lexus goes the latter route.

    Having said that, I’d argue the best interface of this type, for aesthetics and function, is the Cadillac CTS.

  • avatar
    Upuaut

    I own a 2007 M35, bought about 1.5 years ago. A great bargain as others have mentioned, due to initial depreciation. I plan on keeping the car about 10 years so depreciation from now on is not so important to me, even a luxury car that depreciated relatively slowly will not be worth much when it is 12 years old anyway.
    Some comments about this article:
    The picture of the rear of the M is of a 2006 or 2007 model. The 2008’s and up have smaller tail lights, which I think look better.
    But I did not like the look of the interior wood in the 2008+ cars, and since I am driving and see the wood all the time and not the tail lights, I got a 2007.
    I was initially surprised at the low placing this car got in this test. When the car came out just about any road test I saw had it #1, typically the BMW 5 was #2 and various other cars afterwards. But the tests were usually the M45 sport versus other sport models. After I read the whole review I am not surprised at the low placing. The author likes neither the looks of the outside, or the inside. And does not even mention, never mind giving points for, long term reliability. looks are a subjective thing, I like the looks of the car, except the tail lights. And since I am keeping it long term I pay attention to projected long term reliability. If I didn’t, I may have wound up with an Audi. Since I do, Audi and Merc were not even on the list, and BMW was a maybe.
    So far the M has been trouble-free.
    Anytime I read a car comparo and the word ‘soul” or “soulless” is used to describe a car I roll my eyes and skip to the end, as inevitably the BMW has won.
    To paraphrase another earlier poster, you can have your soul, pulled over on the side of the road with your hood up as I drive by.

  • avatar
    Imjustsayin

    Hey saponetta,

    Every time I happen to be unfortunate enough to see your name amongst these posts, I throw up a little bit in my mouth.

    And I drive a German brand.

    Like tonycd said: you really need to get over yourself.

    imjustsayin

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Upuaut :
    October 22nd, 2009 at 5:00 pm

    I was initially surprised at the low placing this car got in this test. When the car came out just about any road test I saw had it #1, typically the BMW 5 was #2 and various other cars afterwards. But the tests were usually the M45 sport versus other sport models. After I read the whole review I am not surprised at the low placing. The author likes neither the looks of the outside, or the inside. And does not even mention, never mind giving points for, long term reliability. looks are a subjective thing, I like the looks of the car, except the tail lights. And since I am keeping it long term I pay attention to projected long term reliability. If I didn’t, I may have wound up with an Audi. Since I do, Audi and Merc were not even on the list, and BMW was a maybe.

    I think you make a valid point about reliability, but that gets back to why I placed the M35 last – it’s a rational consideration, and this was a test of sport sedans, which aren’t rational purchases.

    Still, the M isn’t a bad car at all – it handles and steers very well, it’s extremely well equipped and priced, and it’s a great family hauler. If it had the G’s more powerful engine and 7-speed transmission (and those great paddle shifters), it definitely would have placed higher.

  • avatar
    rhomp2002

    The cars may not be rational purchases but if they are unreliable, then what use are they. It s like the old Jags where you put up with a car that needed almost constant repairs for the few times you could drive them. The difference now is the price of the repairs.

    Personally I would prefer a car that came close to best handling, performance, etc and also is reliable. Then it would be not only a sports sedan but also a rational purchase – win/win. I have heard all too many reports of just how bad the Audis are at staying out of the repair shops and the insane prices of repairs on BMW’s to even consider them. Mercedes has not exactly been a paragon of reliability in the past few years either. Give me a sports sedan that can be depended on to work over one that is just too fragile to depend on anytime. I want one that I know I can get into and go play games with.

  • avatar
    bcain12

    I would just like to say that I am a PROUD Infiniti M35x owner and everything that I’ve read is all negative. I would like to point out that the car is NOT loud at all. Engine fits the pull great. I’ve NEVER had an issue with it. Are any of you actual owners of the car or just going off of one little test drive. I’ll admit that all the buttons on the dash are a little frustrating, but you get used to them. To the guy who is “SCARED” we are using the buttons while driving, the car is so good that it won’t allow you to use majority of them while in drive. Also, as for that “beeping” noise when you cross lines, it can be turned off. If you look above the button to pop your trunk you’ll see a button that has a little diagram of a car with two lines on either side, push it when you turn it on and whala! no more beeping, however it does turn back on once vehicle is shut off so you have to turn it off every time you drive.

    I don’t know where everyone is getting their opinions but I love this car! Greatest luxury sport sedan I’ve ever own/driven. Personally it tops a Beamer or Audi! But that’s just my opinion.


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