By on August 17, 2009

The Chevy Impala already gets dumped on for being a fleet queen holdover, but a Kansas City Star investigation reveals that it might not actually be fleety enough for buyers like Enterprise Rent-A-Car. It turns out that Enterprise ordered 66,000 Impalas from GM without the side airbags that are standard equipment on all retail Impalas. Worse still, hundreds of these Impalas were sold with the side bags listed as standard equipment. Enterprise saved $175 on each Impala by deleting the bags, for a total of about $11.5 million in savings. Thanks to the misleading online sales though, Enterprise is offering to buy back the nearly 750 Impalas sold under false pretenses for $750 over Kelly Blue Book Value. Beyond that effort though, Enterprise is defending its standard safety feature deletion by arguing that it never violated any federal mandate. Congratulations, guys, you aren’t criminals. Meanwhile, when it comes to buying fleet vehicles, buyer beware.

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51 Comments on “Enterprise Rent-A-Car Deletes Impala Standard Side Airbags...”


  • avatar
    KatiePuckrik

    Is this an initiative to make people stop at “Stop” signs?

  • avatar
    210delray

    Side airbags were also a fleet-only option on 2008-09 Cobalt 4-doors (retail units had standard side airbags beginning in the 2008 model year.

    http://www.iihs.org/ratings/rating.aspx?id=944

  • avatar
    Tiger Commanche

    I bet getting t-boned in one of those cars really Hertz.

  • avatar
    kamikaze2b

    This is good to know. The next time I rent a car I will be sure to choose to rent from a company that values my safety over $175.

  • avatar
    dastanley

    CarMax buys vehicles from various rental companies. CarMax shoppers beware when the vehicle’s source listed on their website says “prior rental”.

  • avatar
    yankinwaoz

    In fairness, this article doesn’t compare the Enterprise cars to other rental firms. Do the other rental firms do the same thing? It doesn’t say, but logic would dictate that they do.

  • avatar
    Jeff Waingrow

    This is a perfect example of the kind of sleazy crap pulled by one company or another. No arguement here about doing away with them, but why, oh, why the reservations about regulating them aggressively? You’d think that after the banks and hedge funds nearly took the economy down that it wouldn’t be a point of contention. By the way, did anyone check for other missing parts on those Impalas?

  • avatar
    superbadd75

    CarMax buys vehicles from various rental companies. CarMax shoppers beware when the vehicle’s source listed on their website says “prior rental”.

    Lots of used car dealers buy rental cars, this is not exclusive to CarMax. Usually the GM rentals from enterprise are offered at GM sales first, only available to GM dealers. Always watch what you’re buying, no matter what dealer it’s at.

    I wonder what the crash rating for the Impala is without those side airbags.

  • avatar
    Dave Skinner

    Note that the article criticizing Enterprise for marketing these vehicles with incorrect information does a poor job of identifying the actual component deleted from the car. The phrases “Side airbags” (seat mounted units) and “side curtain airbags” (roof mounted units) appear to be used interchangeably. After reading the article, I’m still not sure if the cars lacked the roof bags, or the seat mounted bags.

    Even on a new car, tracking these features is very difficult, and I’m guessing Enterprise used vehicle sales made an honest mistake, and they appear to be making good on the error. No real story here in terms of “evil corporations”.

    The bigger story is why manufacturers sell cars without these safety components. Even now, very few manufacturers offer side and side curtain airbags across their product line, and the reason to delete them is always the same- To reduce the base price.

    As long as some buyers purchase vehicles based strictly on acquisition costs, manufacturers that make all safety features standard on all models will pay a price in sales, since the competition is willing to delete safety features to advertise a cheaper base price.

  • avatar
    Justin Berkowitz

    This really pisses me off. I have specifically chosen rental cars on the Enterprise lot because I knew (wrongly) that the model came with standard side curtain and/or thorax airbags.

    So much for that theory.

  • avatar

    My question is, has Enterprise (or any other rental company that ordered cars with standard safety features deleted) opened themselves to massive lawsuits because of this? If the company doesn’t notify the renter that some of the normally-standard (and expected) safety equipment isn’t installed in the car they’re renting, and they’re injured in an accident where the airbags would have been activated, could the rental company be liable for the injuries?

  • avatar
    menno

    I wonder if Hyundai or Kia delete air bags for rental companies on demand?

    I suspect NOT since all but the Sonata and Santa Fe are manufactured in South Korea at this time (until such time as the Kia plant is up and running, in the south, that is).

    I’m renting a minivan for a vacation in about 3 weeks and will be asking questions….

  • avatar
    Chicago Dude

    It seriously blows my mind that Enterprise would ask GM to delete a safety feature to save $175.

    I am not surprised at all that GM would do it.

  • avatar
    V6

    i just rented an Escape through National, was pretty happy with them & the price was so much better than the other major players i checked out. the Escape seemed to be optioned up too, was an XLT 4wd with leather & sunroof, can’t imagine they’d then delete airbags after adding spec?

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    I’ll continue to use enterprise simply because their customer service is top notch. I’ve yet to find another rental agency that comes close to them. I’ll just have to make sure I never get t-boned on the drivers side.

  • avatar
    pixarwolf

    I bought a 2006 Chevrolet Cobalt – “rental car edition” new from a now defunct dealer – no power windows no power locks and no side impact air bags- since I was renting from Enterprise so much I figured why not buy a “rental” – won’t do that again. another 15 payments and she’s all mine :(

  • avatar
    jpcavanaugh

    Offer to buy 66,000 of anything from GM and I’ll bet they build it. Anybody want to get together on an order for a bunch of 62 Impala SS convertibles with 327, Powerglide and air? Maybe legal if they sell them as commemoratives.

  • avatar
    segfault

    Onstar and side airbags can be deleted for a credit on fleet models of the Impala.

  • avatar
    Robert Schwartz

    Tiger Commanche: +1

  • avatar
    mikey

    @Chicago Dude..GM is in the car selling buisness. The customer wants 66000 cars without the side airbag. Is the side airbag mandatory? No.

    GM meets the customers demand. End of story. Find me anybody, in any buisness, anywhere, that would turn down an order like that

  • avatar

    I wonder if these cars were ever crash-tested without those expensive airbags? The IIHS site only shows tests with them in place:
    http://www.iihs.org/ratings/rating.aspx?id=674

    I think it would be important for a rental customer to know that the vehicle they’re renting might not be as safe as the ones tested. I would sure want to know this info when choosing what car to rent. Do you think the counter agents are knowledgeable about this?

    I can easily see Enterprise losing more than that 11-odd million bucks in a couple of lawsuits over the reduced safety of their cars. I’m sure the clown who put this scheme together got a bonus, but it could prove to be a very expensive choice in the end.

    As for buying a previously-rented car: why would any sane person do that? Rentals get treated like crap from day 1, and I can’t imagine how buying a rental – even with a warranty – would be a wise way to spend money. I certainly wouldn’t want to own any car I’ve ever rented.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    I bought a fleet Impala 2LT last April in 2008 and made sure it had the side and curtain air bags. It now has over 50K miles and has been one of the best cars I have owned. GM offers the option to fleet customers to delete Curtain air bags and Onstar for some strange reason.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    I bought a fleet Impala 2LT last April in 2008 and made sure it had the side and curtain air bags. It now has over 50K miles and has been one of the best cars I have owned. GM offers the option to fleet customers to delete Curtain air bags and Onstar for some strange reason.

  • avatar
    toxicroach

    Wait— so the sale price is lowered 750 by the lack of airbags.

    But Enterprise saved 175 bucks.

    So it lost $575 in the end to get rid of those bags? Am I thinking straight here?

  • avatar
    ihatetrees

    Dave Skinner:
    The bigger story is why manufacturers sell cars without these safety components. Even now, very few manufacturers offer side and side curtain airbags across their product line, and the reason to delete them is always the same- To reduce the base price.

    Another one: To reduce complexity and and give the vehicle a much better chance to hit 200K miles. Airbag replacement or malfunction can be THE major component in an otherwise serviceable vehicle that makes it worthless.

    I’d be more open to mandatory helmets in cars than mandatory side, side curtain, sunroof, sun visor, air vent, and (from what I hear is next) nose hair airbags.

  • avatar
    CarPerson

    I refer you to the “Chevrolet Launches Cruse” article on page 11 and 12 of the December 2008 issue of “Automotive Engineering,” an SAE publication. In the article, Peter Mertens, Global Vehicle Line Executive for Compact Cars extols the virtues of the interior soft plastic being much cheaper than it appears (!).

    He then goes on to state that although the Cruse body has 140% more torsional rigidity compared to the Cobalt, it does not pass the side crash-protection requirements in those jurisdictions who, despite intense lobbying to block, passed legislation forcing carmakers to increase vehicle safety.

    Specifically, to pass the U.S. side crash standards, reinforcements had to be added to the B-pillars and the rocker panels to better tie both into the sides to achieve the necessary crash test results.

    Also stated was the fact that the higher level of safety will only be added in those areas where government regulation prevents them from being left out. Paraphrasing Mr. Mertens, “It will be a cold day in Hell when GM pisses away $4 and 3lbs per car on some dumb-ass goal of protecting vehicle occupants in a side crash.”

    GM is running it’s own “Ugly American” campaign in the countries that receive the Cruse.

    SEARCH TERMS FOR FUTURE LITIGATION SEARCH:
    T-Bone, Side Impact, Crash, Accident, Intersection, Red light, Stop Sign, Irresponsible car design, Multimillion Dollar Settlements, Chevy Cruse.

  • avatar
    mikey

    As a customer you can demand whatever your heart desires in a rental car. They might tell you “we ain’t got it”.. fair enough, walk away.

    I find National or Enterprise great to deal with.
    I’m on vacation when I rent so I always ask for a Mustang convertible. The odd time I get stuck with a Sebring,I was a little pissed the last time and they knocked a couple of bucks off.

    @ B&B Lets not make GM the bad guy here. If there is a beef,[I don\'t believe there is] it the rental peoples problem.

    If you want 6 airbags, tell them up front,and thier going to find you a car.

  • avatar
    cdotson

    CarPerson:

    Your search terms might yield more potential future litigants if you properly spelled the name of the Chevy Cruze.

  • avatar
    RedStapler

    Rental Car Agencies are rank armatures when it comes to deleting optional items for a lower base price on vehicles.

    They need to take lessons from the real pros in the motor freight business.

    Try driving in a Brand new Freightliner with no Radio, passenger seat, fuel gauge or tachometer.

  • avatar
    commando1

    RedStapler: “Rental Car Agencies are rank armatures when it comes to deleting optional items for a lower base price on vehicles.
    They need to take lessons from the real pros in the motor freight business.
    Try driving in a Brand new Freightliner with no Radio, passenger seat, fuel gauge or tachometer.”

    You and I worked at the same company…
    Further investigation revealed that an authorization was given for a higher priced tractor. The fleet manager pocketted the difference…

  • avatar
    50merc

    jpcavanaugh: “Anybody want to get together on an order for a bunch of 62 Impala SS convertibles with 327, Powerglide and air?”

    Sign me up!

    P.S. If they’re selling for 1962 prices.

  • avatar
    Porsche986

    So what if it was technically legal? It saved Enterprise a whole $175 per car. What a bunch of d-bags. From now on I am going to ask LOUDLY at the rental counter if they purposely deleted the side air-bags on the vehicle. Any company that does not consider my safety (and everyone else’s for that matter) does not deserve my business.

  • avatar
    iNeon

    What of the customers due diligence?

    If I buy an automobile that has “premium audio” written on the sticker, and *then* inspect my purchase– I don’t get to bitch when it has a ‘Road Gear’ head unit.

    Why didn’t these people look for a little loop tag with the letters SRS on the outboard seat seams? Why didn’t they look for little letters embossed into the a or b pillars?

    These are not new cars. Used automobiles are used– they have been someone else’s property. They are not required to meet any safety or equipment specifications.

    For the few arguing that Enterprise did this to save $175.00–

    Per car. 66,000 of them. You pinch pennies in this case, whomever you are.

  • avatar
    Bancho

    ihatetrees :

    Find me a rental company that keeps a car long enough for that to make sense (200k miles), seriously.

  • avatar
    akear

    Folks this is still the best selling retail GM vehicle, which just illustrates how bad things really are. GM actually now sells more Malibus to the rental fleets than Impalas.

    Why is there no room in the new Malibu? Just adding my two cents here.

  • avatar
    John Horner

    “Enterprise is defending its standard safety feature deletion by arguing that it never violated any federal mandate.”

    Isn’t it funny how big companies talk about of both sides of their mouths? First, we don’t want any federal mandates about anything anytime because we are responsible citizens who will do the right thing without a nanny state. Second, sure we did something sneaky which increased the risk to our customers, but there was no federal mandate stopping us, so it’s all good.

  • avatar
    Justin Berkowitz

    mikey :
    @ B&B Lets not make GM the bad guy here. If there is a beef,[I don\'t believe there is] it the rental peoples problem.

    I agree, if anyone, Enterprise, not GM.

    iNeon :

    What of the customers due diligence?

    “It was the buyer’s responsibility” comes to an end when a corporate seller blatantly and negligently misrepresents a difficult-to-assess aspect of the car. Especially because this is not a regular factory option, but a custom order. It is NOT something that the average buyer doing proper research could foresee.

    Do we know that they substituted dummy plastic without SRS into the ovals on the pillars? Second, is every car with side airbags required by law to put in that SRS logo? Are there cars with side airbags but without the logo?

    What if the SRS logos are there? Should sellers be checking to make sure the bags weren’t stolen?

    Out of curiosity, what in your opinion *is* a seller obligated to honestly disclose?

    What is your checklist when buying used cars? Do you have them dyno tested? (serious question, I’m not trying to be a jerk).

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    Isn’t it funny how big companies talk about of both sides of their mouths? First, we don’t want any federal mandates about anything anytime because we are responsible citizens who will do the right thing without a nanny state. Second, sure we did something sneaky which increased the risk to our customers, but there was no federal mandate stopping us, so it’s all good.…

    Ain’t that the truth. There isn’t a chance in hell that today’s cars would be a safe as they are if they weren’t mandated to be safer. Remember the crappy bumpers that most SUV’s had? Lower standards equal lower crash performance. Just check out some of the bumper performance videos on YouTube.

  • avatar
    ihatetrees

    Bancho:
    Find me a rental company that keeps a car long enough for that to make sense (200k miles), seriously.

    Seriously, that’s irrelevant.

    I replied to a post about why manufacturers make vehicles without every conceivable airbag.

    My point was that there’s a market for such vehicles. Those who keep vehicles for a long time often prefer models with fewer electrical components.

  • avatar
    don1967

    Wait— so the sale price is lowered 750 by the lack of airbags.

    But Enterprise saved 175 bucks.

    So it lost $575 in the end to get rid of those bags? Am I thinking straight here?

    You’re thinking straight, except for the fact that Enterprise won’t have to actually buy back all those Impalas. They are merely offering to do it.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    Forget Enterprise or safety concerns for a second — making these cars was an act of brand suicide for Chevrolet.

    The last thing that GM needs is for customers to believe that their cars have substandard safety equipment packages. Back in the ’60′s, it may have been acceptable to offer steering columns that impale the driver at no extra charge and lap belts as an option, but today, the customer demands safety equipment as a matter of course.

    Had I been GM, I would have declined Enterprise’s kind offer. If anything, I would have made a point of making a better car so that a renter might be more likely to become a buyer as a result of the experience.

  • avatar
    taxman100

    Get a grip. I’ve never owned a car in my life with side airbags, and for people to think you will die from one week of renting a car without one is slightly paranoid.

    Let me put it this way. If an Impala at Enterprise is $30 a day, and an Impala at Hertz with the magical airbags is $31 a day, I’m taking the Enterprise Impala.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I’ll be heading back to my hometown shortly for a weekend wedding. I reserved a Budget rental at the weekly rate of $676. They really stick it to you at the Islip airport this time of year apparently.

    After thinking about it, I decided to rent at an off site location. I don’t need the car on the first and last days so I’ll only have the car for 4 days, not 6. I rented from a “full size” from (gasp!) Enterprise which is a “Chevy Impala, Nissan Altima, Dodge Charger or similar” in Enterprise speak.

    I always try to rent the safest car as the folks on my native Long Island are a bit nutty behind the wheel. I had a Grand Marquis (or similar) reserved at Budget. I’ve been cutting people off all week and raising my aggression back to (nearly) New York levels in anticipation of my trip. I was going to ask for an upgrade when I arrive, I usually ask what’s available at what price..hope I can get something better than an Impala! I won’t be disappointed if that’s all they have, of course. As long as it’s clean. If anything, I prefer the newest car possible, that’s all.

  • avatar
    Justin Berkowitz

    taxman100 :
    August 17th, 2009 at 10:12 pm

    Get a grip. I’ve never owned a car in my life with side airbags, and for people to think you will die from one week of renting a car without one is slightly paranoid.

    Let me put it this way. If an Impala at Enterprise is $30 a day, and an Impala at Hertz with the magical airbags is $31 a day, I’m taking the Enterprise Impala.

    Isn’t this just as extreme?

    Even if side airbags increased my chances of surviving a side collision by 1%, I’d think $1/day is probably worth it. No?

  • avatar
    BuzzDog

    taxman100: “…for people to think you will die from one week of renting a car without one is slightly paranoid.”

    LMAO…you are so right! I’m reminded of a woman, back in 1989 or so, who I witnessed chewing out the service rep at the Toyota dealer because he wouldn’t drop everything to fix the “mouse belt” shoulder harness on the front passenger seat…IMMEDIATELY. She kept saying that putting one of her children into that seat was “abuseive and neglectful.” Never mind that her minivan had five other passenger seats. Or that she probably rode around in her parent’s car unbuckled for her entire childhood.

    Don’t get me wrong, I have all of the safety equipment you can shake a stick at (air bags all around, ABS, rear backup camera, and the list goes on and on) and I like having it, but I never, ever really pay all that much attention to what’s in a rental that I may drive for a few hours, at most. The chances of me getting into a serious accident in a rental is so low as to not even register as a blip on my radar.

    Like most people, I rent on the basis of price…and I don’t think I’m that unusual in that regard.

  • avatar

    If you use Enterprise on a regular basis, sign up for free to the Enterprise Plus loyalty program.

    Not only does it make renting about 5 x faster, they hassle you less about the nickel and dime stuff like insurance and GPS, and you can usually get cheap or free upgrades.

    Always ask for the Prius. They’ve deleted a few things that are standard on the retail, like the AUX port for the head unit, but it has all the major safety items like a full set of airbags, cruise, and ABS.

    Enterprise are cheap for a reason. Ask for their more interesting cars, and you’ll find they have fewer deletions because they can’t order them in big enough quantities to get a running change.

    Andrew

  • avatar
    Daniel J. Stern

    @Taxman:
    Get a grip. I’ve never owned a car in my life with side airbags, and for people to think you will die from one week of renting a car without one is slightly paranoid.

    It’s actually a great deal more than “slightly” paranoid. The degree of panty-twist exhibited in this thread is way out of proportion to the incremental difference in safety in the unlikely event of a collision severe enough to make the presence or absence of side airbags matter.

  • avatar
    iNeon

    Mr. Berkowitz:

    My Mother bought a previously-rented 2006 Dodge Stratus in late 2007. In this transaction, the window sticker wasn’t even consulted. No one should take a used vehicle’s window sticker as gospel. No one. Not whenever new car’s stickers can be(and sometimes, are) wrong.

    She checked the car for aesthetics, ergonomics and equipment she wanted. I checked the car from a mechanical/value/enthusiast angle. There are 3 horizontal lines in a rounded-corner block pressed-into the tops of the B-pillars in this car. It has no side airbags!

    You’re introducing noise into this argument that needn’t be here. If the cars don’t have airbags, and retain the identifier they do– sure there’s a problem. That was never mentioned.

    What was mentioned was the author’s opinion that Enterprise and GM have put people at risk, and at their own expense. This is an issue, he forgot to include blame for the consumer for not having inspected goods prior to purchase.

    Airbags are required by law to be easily identifiable in automobiles equipped with them. This is why those 3 little letters were mentioned in my original response– SRS = airbag. Blanks, no looptag on the seat, or plain pillar/dash cover = no airbag. It’s that simple. I’m all for protecting the consumer, but in this case it’s a non-issue.

    Shall I repeat information from the original article? Only 750 of the cars were sold under these false pretenses. Of 66,000, 65,250 people didn’t fall victim to this ‘blatant’ advantage-taking scheme. The number of affected consumers is small enough for this to be a mistake, and not some nefarious plot on the parts of GM and Enterprise.

    Mr. Neidermeyer:

    We need to know if the vehicles included SRS identifiers to further this argument.

  • avatar
    DweezilSFV

    @taxman and all:Amen

    My last car had ABS, traction control, front airbags, etc [99 Cavalier]. It was totalled in a rear ender by some guy in a BMW.

    I was in the left hand turn lane stopped for a red arrow at 5 a.m. a block or two from my job.

    It was replaced by a 2005 ION without ABS or traction control. I am now “less safe” by a factor of what? And have never had side airbags. I feel less safe by a factor of zero simply because I don’t live in the land of “what if.”

    Props to the poster who suggested there are people out there who prefer their rides with fewer electronic accessories or mumbo jumbo because over time they are less expensive to repair. Even the ION has too much electro-nonsense : electronic throttle and steering assist.[Thankfully no power seats, windows,locks. This is GM you know...]

    I am one of those people for whom the added weight, expense and complexity of On Star, heated windshield wiper fluid, Power seats, windows, NAV and the multi vibrating auto-set prostate prober of dubious utility.

    This fleet Impala sounds just like my cup of tea in a larger domestic. Just keep talking them down. The more you do, the better deal I get on one.

    @ Justin Berkowitz: No
    Happy Motoring,everyone.

  • avatar
    fincar1

    “I certainly wouldn’t want to own any car I’ve ever rented.”

    Sir, I hope I am never your landlord.

  • avatar
    faiza

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