By on June 26, 2009

TTAC’s Sajeev Mehta ruminates on all things automotive in an all-new evening address.

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16 Comments on “Daily Podcast: The Sajeevcast...”


  • avatar
    Strippo

    Tonight’s Sajeevcast is brought to you by Trojan Ecstacy.

    Feels Like Nothing’s There!

  • avatar
    Strippo

    Also? I can vouch for those Honda mowers being worth every penny. I bought mine eleven years ago. Every other mower on the block seems to run rich. Mine runs like the day I bought it. So I’ve got that going for me. Which is nice.

  • avatar

    So GM is getting smug satisfaction from pointing out Honda’s lawnmower division… I seem to recall that GM once owned Frigidaire and made air conditioners, washing machines (unique ones at that, hello Unimatic), and other appliances. In fact the products said “Product of General Motors”. Fast forward a few years and now they have resorted to doing the same thing with their cars in the form of the little GM badge.

  • avatar
    Harleyflhxi

    Great analysis, Sajeev! I’ll listen to every edition!

  • avatar
    ajla

    There is a bit of irony that you criticize GM for sticking so long with the W-body and then later say that using the Panther platform cars as a core model would have been a good idea for Ford.

    Around 1995, the Panthers needed a major update, but Ford didn’t give it to them. By 2002 they were brutally out of date. The only people that have bought them for retail in the last 10 years are retirees and RWD BOF loyalists. When the Chrysler 300 came out and their was a revived interest in RWD, Ford decided to pull the plug on the Marauder rather than improve it (and its platform-mates) to compete with the Mopars.

    Just like Chrysler’s M-body and GM’s 3800, the Panther cars have their place in history, but their lack of advancement throughout the years have made them obsolete. They belong in museums or a collector’s garage- not a showroom.

  • avatar

    ajla : There is a bit of irony that you criticize GM for sticking so long with the W-body and then later say that using the Panther platform cars as a core model would have been a good idea for Ford.

    Only a little bit ironic. We all know the Panther needs new sheetmetal, the Explorer’s powertrain and the Taurus’ interior. Nobody thinks the current iteration is great: its a shadow of what it could be. You can hate (to varying degrees) the current Panther, but people buy it. Even as Ford tries to push it out with the D3 bodies, the Panther continues to outsell them. With zero advertising and R&D improvements. With zero sweetheart lease deals.

    The stale Panther has won Ford’s full-size (sales) gamble almost every month since the D3’s introduction in 2005. But don’t believe me, look at Ford’s monthly sales numbers: the Panther is one of Ford’s core models, stale or not.

    Yeah, most of the buyers are old people and fleet freaks. But with a foundation this strong and loyal, don’t you think this platform could thrive with the stupid amounts of money thrown at the D3 platform? My assertion is that the Panther That Should Have Been would easily outsell the D3s and the current Panther combined. And the Chrysler 300 wouldn’t have fared as well as it did circa 2006.

    Point is, run what you brung and what brings you money. Otherwise you get burdened with too many platforms and a near-lethal amount of debt to keep the lies afloat.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    the reason why Honda cars have always topped the quality ratings

    Honda cut its teeth making lawnmowers and motorcycles… they were forced to make the things with their open hoses and metal structures like cylinder heads and metal pipes look good with everything exposed to the customer.

    So when they moved to cars they took this philosophy with them.

    Let’s be clear… Honda also make corporate jets. What can they say about that?

    Another example of why GM blows.

  • avatar
    enderw88

    I initially read the RSS feed as “TTAC’s Sajeev Mehta ruminates on all things automotive in an all-new evening dress.” Which is really not something I wanted to think about before going to sleep…

  • avatar
    keepaustinweird

    just a format comment. I really enjoy podcasts…when they are free form comments or discussion. But this was reading right off the page, and ultimately I would have preferred to read the content myself as opposed to hearing Sajeev read to me.

  • avatar

    keepaustinweird : But this was reading right off the page, and ultimately I would have preferred to read the content myself as opposed to hearing Sajeev read to me.

    That’s good to know. Seriously.

    Believe it or not, I only made talking points (outline format in Word) to ensure I said everything I wanted to say. This solo-podcasting thing is tough.

  • avatar

    What? No car advice? No Texas accent? Actually, a Piston Slap podcast might be interesting, now that I think about it.

    A solo podcast is tough. Reminds me of doing talk radio in college. It’s hard to keep going on your own for that long, even when you have those talking points.

  • avatar
    mikey

    @Sajeev I liked it,very informative.

  • avatar

    Theodore: in order to have interesting content on a weekly basis, I assume a Piston Slap subject will find its way in here. I can’t imagine doing talk radio, because filling up time like that makes it real hard to keep on message and free of somewhat less factual rants.

    Staying cool and on message means I need a blueprint of some sort. I think.

    For the record, I have a mild Texas accent in real life. And I don’t wear evening dresses, ever.

  • avatar

    Having a blueprint is good. For each show I did I had a list of topics I wanted to address. That was true whether I was solo or had a sidekick in the studio with me. Gave me something to come back to when the rant/discussion wandered too far afield and/or ran its course.

    There are a lot of approaches to a solo gig. It can be a radio address, a speech-like sort of thing. It can be a folksy, let’s have a conversation thing. It can be a more intense, serious thing (which is what this one felt like.) It can be a rant. Of course, those are just a few of the many possibilities. But if you do it often enough, you’ll find a voice that works for you and your audience.

  • avatar
    andrewr

    A truly excellent podcast, by far the best one that TTAC has done for a very long time.

    As someone from Europe, I’m somewhat amazed at the attitude of some Detroit commentators regarding their own makes.

    I have listened to Autoline After Hours and find some of things said so insular and frankly silly.

    It is amazing that a certain Jeep is constantly praised without any mention of Land Rover for example as well as the relish that Toyota’s losses were reported.

    The Detroit makers failed because they treated their customers with contempt by taking them for granted – exactly what caused BL to fail over here. That was shown by poorly developed, badly-built and uncompetitive cars sold for many, many decades. The decline was only slower because the market was so big.

    Regards,

    Andrew

    PS – A neighbour in my block has a late-model Jeep and the poor quality has to be seen to be believed.

  • avatar

    Sadly, a lot of people don’t want to find the truth because they know the answer and they don’t like it.

    Biggest example of that comes from all the lunkheads who refuse to admit that there are imports being made here in the US, employing US workers with money staying in the US. The whole import & domestic thing is so far gone in our history yet people don’t want to acknowledge this.


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