By on May 9, 2009

200km/h ticked by on the digital speedo and I was still pressed into the sports seats. 230km/h flashed by, and the scenery of autobahn, cars, and trees started to blur. 260km/h rolled by and I started to think “Holy hell!”. At 303km/h I became a laser-guided Autobahn Cruise Missile. I swear I heard sonic booms echo off the Opels I passed. The Porsche and I were melded at this point, a human-machine interface so cohesive it would take three g’s of braking force from the vented discs to separate us. I thought I had found driving Nirvana at this point, but I was wrong.

303km/h on the autobahn, while fun, defeats the purpose of a 911, especially the Carrera S. With the upgrade over the standard Carrera, you get .2L extra, some 30 more bhp for a total of 355bhp, bigger brakes and wheels. These features are not meant to go faster on the autobahn with its long straights and sweeping turns. A Mercedes-Benz S-Class will out class a 911 in this regard. The Carrera S comes with all those goodies so when you get to those hidden back roads that linger just past the wall of trees off the A1, you discover the true magic that Porsche engineers into the 911.

I pulled off the A1 onto the L-149, a tight, twisty, scary piece of broken tarmac near the Mosel River Valley. Off camber turns, steep climbs, trees everywhere, and random Ford Fiestas ejecting themselves onto the roadway make the L-149 a free version of the legendary Nürburgring. It was here that I learned what Porsche really means. The faster I pushed the car, the more it pushed me. From the precise steering, to the unflappable suspension, to the seats that cradle you like an astronaut bound for Mars, everything about the car made me feel like a driving god. Screw the autobahn, I will now be commuting to work on the backroads.

However, when I pulled into my driveway, shut her down, and started to unpack my suitcases, I realized, no car will ever reach perfection, they can only excite that petrol gene in your head to such an extreme that everything else is forgiven. The jaunt down the L-149 made me forget about the useless cupholders, the sat-nav that thinks “Traffic Circle Errors” is the English equivalent to “Traffic Jam”, the tiny Asian torture buttons that are impossible to push at 200km/h, and a steering wheel that blocks my oil pressure gauge.

The 997 version of the 911 is Nirvana . . . until the next one comes out, that will most likely look like this version.

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48 Comments on “Capsule Review: (My) 2006 Porsche 911 Carrera S...”


  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    190 MPH! That’s twice as brave as me.

  • avatar
    Martin Schwoerer

    303 clicks, my oh my. I look forward to that drive on the Nürburgring with an odd mixture of anticipation and trepidation. Sure you’ll be able to handle the Nordschleife, but will I be capable of holding the video camera?

  • avatar
    A is A

    190 MPH! That’s twice as brave as me.

    Twice as irresponsible.

  • avatar
    murphysamber

    hope you don’t mind, Mike but I think I’ll live vicariously through you this week. slugging it out on 696 north of Detroit never gets that entertaining.

  • avatar
    WEGIV

    @A is A – please to be explaining how driving at a certain speed is any more or less irresponsible while in a car *designed* to be safely piloted at those speeds on a road populated by other drivers used to being routinely passed by cars doing double or triple their speeds on a road with no speed limit???

  • avatar
    DearS

    Sounds like a great experience, I want to have an experience like that also. I’ll see what my future holds, more will be revealed. In the mean time, I’ll work on becoming a more joyous, healthy, beautiful and worthwhile spiritual being.

    Ask and ye shall receive,
    Seek and ye shall find
    Knock and the door will be opened.

  • avatar
    aunt jemima

    The autobahn is great. The fastest I took my VW Passat rental was @ 200km/hr. At that point the steering lightened noticeably, felt like it became detached from the car, and the front felt like it raised a bit as if the car was trying to take off like a plane. It did not inspire confidence.

    Also at that speed 911′s were blowing past me like i was standing still. That place is awesome.

  • avatar
    zoneofdanger

    Was this picture by any chance taken in the Porsche dealership across the street from the Porsche museum and next door from the factory in Stuttgart?

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    190mph on the autobahn is fine because unlike in most other western nations, slow people stay in the slow lane

  • avatar
    Kman

    What a great write-up. Thanks for sharing… I’ve yet to scratch my 911 itch, but it’s been itching all my life.

  • avatar
    A is A

    @A is A – please to be explaining how driving at a certain speed is any more or less irresponsible while in a car *designed* to be safely piloted at those speeds on a road populated by other drivers used to being routinely passed by cars doing double or triple their speeds on a road with no speed limit???

    Excuse me, sir: You can NOT “safely” “pilot” a car AT ANY SPEED. Car driving is a potentially lethal activity. Every time I start the engine of my Toyota I remind myself this could be my last car trip. It is a sobering truth that clears any mental fog of being “safely piloting” anything.

    Moreover, driving a car at 200km/h (let alone at 250 or 300km/h) is a complete madness, due to some hard-as-nails Medical, Technical and Physical concepts called “reaction time”, “stopping distance” and “kinetic energy”. Finally, there is the inherent frailty of the human body within the context of the incredible forces involved in a car crash. If your job is not related with Medicine, I suggest you to volunteer in a local emergency department or to spend a Saturday in a College Library looking at pictures of car crash victims in books on Traumatology or Forensic Science. You are going to see some very (VERY) nasty things, but you are going to learn a lot of interesting facts about life and you are going to destroy any illusion you could have about car driving as a “safe” activity. It is not. It is a calculated risk at any speed. And those who speed above some common sense limits are much greater risk for themselves AND (regrettably) FOR OTHER USERS of the road.

    Oh, and if you expose yourself to the experience and the information I cited above, you are going to think some things about the author of this post that would get you banned if you published them here. (Please remove this carefully worded phrase if considered as “flaming”. IMO the flamer in this thread is the smiling author of the original post) To sum up: SPEEDING IS FOR MORAL IDIOTS, in the original greek meaning of “Idiot”, i.e., “ignorant person”.

    Please read a fraction of the literature available on this subject:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18210037?ordinalpos=37&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17567969?ordinalpos=53&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17558665?ordinalpos=56&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16872632?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_Discovery_RA&linkpos=3&log$=relatedarticles&logdbfrom=pubmed

  • avatar
    boosterseat

    Sweet. Nicely done, on all levels.

  • avatar

    @ A of A,

    There’s a reason I bought a Porsche 911 and it was not to drive it like a Toyota, as immoral, irresponsible, wreckless, dangerous, and fantastically exciting it may be.

    @ zoneofdanger,

    Yes, that certainly is the Porsche Zentrum Stuttgart, across the street from the museum. If you are going to buy a 911, where else but at the place they make them? Plus the service was fantastic. 5-star dinner, lots of goodies (including a model replica of the car you buy), and you only deal with one person the entire time. No managers, no finance people, no “Bubba”. The entire transaction was such a joy compared to my dealing in the US of A.

    @ Martin,

    I’m a trained and licensed race car driver, what could go wrong? We might have to use suction cups to secure the camera…. but can’t wait to get out to the ‘Ring, just need my real license plates, and not the 5-day temps. Will Natalie be joining us for our epic adventure in search of the ultimate thrill? We should warm up with a lap in your Citroen…

    @ everybody:

    I’m a pilot. I’m also a driver. In the US Air Force, we say we “drive” a jet (i.e. “Eagle Driver”, “Viper Driver”). So can I say I “pilot” a car? I’m a “Porsche Pilot”?

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    @A is A

    I think you are on the wrong site.

    If you are looking for perfect safety, you will do well to sit on a fence and watch the birds….
    Wilbur Wright

  • avatar
    amcadoo

    A is A

    I am in the medical field, as I am guessing you are as well. Have you noticed that most accidents involving major injuries are the result of very young male drivers, intoxicated or not? They are drivers who are not thinking of the inherent risks of their actions AT ALL. Most people who drive a 911 are attendant to those risks, and are probably thinking each second at 190 mph that it is potentially lethal.

  • avatar
    Samir

    Only by coming so close to death are we made to feel truly alive.

  • avatar
    Kman

    In french we say “Pilote de course” for race-car driver. Pilot is right in there.

  • avatar
    James2

    @A is A

    It was a while ago, but I vaguely recall learning in school that “idiot” was applied to those Greeks who didn’t vote in the elections. While in Athens it might be “ignorant” not to vote, it hardly applies when driving a car specifically designed for the German Autobahns, which a “learned” person would also know are safer places than the average American highway.

    Sure, driving (even “safely”) is potentially dangerous, but so is crossing the street. You have a choice: drive your appliance-grade Toyota or walk, either way you take a chance.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    “slugging it out on 696 north of Detroit never gets that entertaining.”

    No, it doesn’t. My personal best on I-696, according to that nice state trooper, was 147mph. I say nice, as he actually let me go. And laughed at me.

    I have been over 130 many times. I guess it helps growing up 100 yards from the ditch.

  • avatar
    BlisterInTheSun

    A is A:

    “Every time I start the engine of my Toyota I remind myself this could be my last car trip.”

    Holy crap dude. You make starting a car sound like dating a stripper.

  • avatar

    Convertible so fast it blew your hair off, eh?

    I’ve heard a thing or two about colloidal silver. -just don’t get it in your eyes.

  • avatar
    A is A

    Holy crap dude. You make starting a car sound like dating a stripper.

    That´s the idea. Being in the knowledge of the risks inherent to driving a car, I get my driving thrills driving at low speed a Toyota Diesel. Less risk, more excitement.

    You have a choice: drive your appliance-grade Toyota or walk, either way you take a chance.

    I know. That makes exciting every driving experience.

    There’s a reason I bought a Porsche 911 and it was not to drive it like a Toyota, as immoral, irresponsible, wreckless, dangerous, and fantastically exciting it may be.

    I suggest you to drive her AT THE TRACK. That´s the place for the kind of driving you described. There you can indulge in that kind of driving with no moral second thoughts: Only your life and the life of like-minded persons is at risk there. I wish you a lot of fun there.

    A decade ago I seated in the driver position of a stationary 1980s Porsche 911. It was quite an experience: What a beautiful cockpit. Then, the owner started the engine for me to hear. Ahhhhhhh, marvellous sound. What a nice car.

    In your shoes I would do my best to avoid wrecking it and maiming/killing yourself or (still worse) others.

    Most people who drive a 911 are attendant to those risks, and are probably thinking each second at 190 mph that it is potentially lethal.

    190 mph in an open road is like playing Russian Roulette in a Kindergarten, no matter how attentive is the driver or how good is the car.

    Just out of curiosity, what on this site do you find interesting?

    * The “Death/Suicide/Bailout Watch” series.

    * The reviews about plain vanilla cars: Aveo, Impala, Voyager, Camry, Kia Rio…

    * Piston slap.

    * Curbside classics.

    Oh, and I learn a very rich english studying the posts here (I create Flashcards with words and expressions I read here). I an a native Spanish speaker and I manage to marvel my (British) English teacher with expressions I learn here. He is amused because I use grammatically correct English expression he has never heard.

    BTW, I bought a Toyota because I am a TTAC reader. TTAC “sold” me Toyota. Toyota is a totally under-the-radar brand in Spain.

    I think you are on the wrong site.

    If you are looking for perfect safety…

    “Perfect safety” does not exist. Calculated risks do.

    And no, I am not “in the wrong site”. There are more modalities of pistonheadeness than you are aware of.

    (Relatively) Safe/Smooth/Efficient driving has its own rewards.

    And the drama of the Economic/Social forces around Cars is an inextinguishable source of interest for an active mind. That´s the reason I got hooked to GM Death Watch.

  • avatar
    Areitu

    Congrats on the car!

    As Bob of the Church of the Subgenius once taught me…

    Don’t just enjoy it. Enjoy the HELL out of it.

  • avatar
    fahrkultur

    The Autobahn is fun, in theory at least… Before you enjoy speeds in excess of 100mph you should be way out of larger cities (speed limits, very heavy traffic). Once you are in unlimited territory, you have to pay extreme careful attention to cars ahead of you. If they start to overtake (and don’t check the rear mirrors) you will approach them with a speed difference of easily more than 40mph. That will limit your speed and you hardly can drive faster than 120 – 140mph most of the time.
    German luxury cars are built for high speed driving, you start appreciating the quality of such a car (steering, brakes) at speeds in excess of 120mph. If you pay attention to your tires (air pressure, no nasty parking maneuvers) you drive on one of the statistically safest road in the world.

  • avatar
    ctoan

    A is A

    Lecturing someone driving a Porsche on the Autobahn about speed is like lecturing a prostitute about abstinence. Either one is safer at their vice than the average teenage idiot, and they’ve generally sorted out the attendant safety problems already. The Autobahn is designed for high speeds safely, and the other drivers are at least partially expecting it.

    The Autobahn is significantly safer than the Interstate system; I have little trouble believing that going 190 on it is safer than, say, going 70 on the Pennsylvania Turnpike (a.k.a. the second superhighway in the world, and barely maintained).

  • avatar
    h82w8

    Congrats on the P-car Mike! I recnetly purchased a ’96 993 Carrera 2, after a 9 year hiatus of 911 ownership (used to have an ’87 3.2 Carrera). That 911 “gestalt” is just so damned compelling. It’s a sickness. Sure you know what I mean.

  • avatar
    A is A

    Lecturing someone driving a Porsche on the Autobahn about speed is like lecturing a prostitute about abstinence

    I am not lecturing him, I am lecturing the casual reader of this page.

    Besides, it is a moral imperative to tell the wrongdoer that he/she is doing wrong.

  • avatar
    rcolayco

    Hello Mr. A of A:
    Only a small percentage of the human population is willing or able to practice the admirable level of righteousness that you evidently practice in your daily behavior.

    With all due respect, I suggest you consider living in Singapore. The citizens of that society appear happy to be guided by their Leader’s prohibition against smoking, chewing gum, and of course speeding, among other pleasures.

    To actively participate in a chat group of motor enthusiasts and call them idiots is analogous to entering a cigar or wine connoisseurs’ lounge and railing against their (in your view) irresponsible behavior.

    Mike Solowiow:

    Enjoy the Ring. If you can (if you haven’t already done so), consider visiting the Manthey Racing shop adjacent to the Ring. Very impressive. When my son and I did that in the summer of ’06, we saw a few Yanks with several Vettes working with Manthey’s people in a visitor-restricted area. Did Chevy get some help lifting the Vette’s handling from Manthey? Nothing wrong with that.

    One of the things that we enjoyed was to watch the factory teams do their thing on the track during the early part of the day, before the Ring is opened to the public for a couple of hours every day. The other is to see the very broad range of skill and commitment amongst the enthusiasts that go there. We learned so much from the frequent users of the place just by following them and observing their braking points and lines.

    It is sad to see that over the years, even the autobahn has become congested. There are fewer and fewer speed-unrestricted stretches, and in many places, speed is limited to 80 kph near the exits, and 120 kph elsewhere.

    But as you’ve noted, German road discipline is remarkable. Sometimes to an amusing degree. Some years ago when I happened to drive a Volvo T5 (ie, turbo charged), I had resigned myself to indefinitely following an inconsiderate fellow in an Opel who seemed oblivious to my wanting to go faster than the 150 kph we were both doing in the fast lane. Then I saw a 911 Turbo on my tail so moved out of the way for him. When I did that, the guy in the Opel did likewise.

    In brief, he was perfectly willing to make room for a 911 but not for a turbo-charged Volvo!

  • avatar
    doch

    Congrats on the car.

    I’m glad to see someone who owns a 911 actually driving it fast. I see a lot on the road – almost never see one driven fast. I guess this is due to the age of the average 911 buyer – but it seems like a waste.

  • avatar

    @willman,

    It wasn’t the convertible that blew my hair off, it was the chemo therapy. I’m just happy I’m still here, and able to drive.

    @ areitu,

    I enjoy the hell out of it again, and again, and again….

    Punch it! And I’m gone.

  • avatar
    RogerB34

    Does seem that cost considerations, purchase and operate, are a major factor in selecting a car and the Porsche 911 is affordable to the rich and to fools with a penchant for debt. Recent check SCal within 100 miles San Diego, 7 pages of 911′s on AutoTrader. Tells me that want a Porsche 911 far exceeds pay for a Porsche. Insult to injury CReports sporty cars: 1. BMW 135i, 2. Beloved 911, 3. Corvette, 4. Mazda 3 MazdaSpeed, 5.Porsche Boxter, 6 and 7 same score Miata and Subaru Impreza.

  • avatar
    jmo

    I’ve been to the Porsche factory – the employees were like the dwarfs marching through the gate to the turn of “Hi ho, Hi ho, it’s off to work we go.” I think it had someting to do with their sky high salaries, 6 weeks of vacation, and the ability to lease a porsche for 1% of the value per month.

    Our rental for the trip from Frankfurt to Stutgart was an Audi A8. You would be driving down the Autobahn at 130mph when some woman in her M5 wagon (with car seats in the back) would be flashing her lights telling you to get the f**k out of the way.

    And then there would be the bikes! You would be doing 125 and you would hear an ungodly wail. Then in a flash, going what 165 – 185 mph a Ducati 996 or a CBR would scream past in a blurr.

    You’ll note that Germany, with no speed limits on a significant portion of the Autbahn has a significantly lower highway fatality rate than the US. Why? You don’t eat, talk on the phone, shave your legs, use your laptop, when you’re going 150+ mph.

  • avatar
    jmo

    RogerB34,

    Jealous much?

  • avatar
    jmo

    kowsnofskia,

    Then how do you explain Germany’s low highway fatality rate? Could it be that when people drive fast they pay more attention to what they are doing? I would venture to guess that the majority of the highway fatalities in the US, not atributable to drinking, are related to people not paying attention to what they are doing.

  • avatar
    kowsnofskia

    “Then how do you explain Germany’s low highway fatality rate? Could it be that when people drive fast they pay more attention to what they are doing? I would venture to guess that the majority of the highway fatalities in the US, not atributable to drinking, are related to people not paying attention to what they are doing.”

    I’m not talking about German drivers here; they’ve been better trained and they’re usually driving vehicles that have been designed to be driven fast safely. I’m not disputing the fact that the Autobahn is likely safer than any American highway.

    What makes me cringe is the idea of the newly licensed teenager down the street pushing his mom’s Caravan to the limit on I-90 just to “see what she can do”.

  • avatar
    GiddyHitch

    Although I casually lust after a Cayman S, I still don’t fundamentally “get” a 911 beyond the sexy shape and I’m not sure that this review went any further in enlightening me.

    I’ve topped out Opel and Mazda wagons on the Autobahn at 240 kph (149 mph) and even at that speed, you are focused like you are at very few other times in your life. Launching off of a cornice on a snowboard and bombing down some hairy singletrack on a mountain bike come to mind – basically, when life and limb and unnatural speed converge. Driving the Autobahn is an experience every pistonhead should enjoy, if only to reinforce and justify the outrage they must surely feel for the condition of roads in their home state as well as the drivers who use them. Glass smooth, 18″ thick. with no bump steer-inducing expansion joints – it is a beauty indeed. And while I expected to be blown off the road by Porsches and Bimmers, it was the Audi drivers who were the real leadfoots.

    “With all due respect, I suggest you consider living in Singapore. The citizens of that society appear happy to be guided by their Leader’s prohibition against smoking, chewing gum, and of course speeding, among other pleasures.”

    rcolayco, Sings generally cut loose and act like drunken sailors once they cross into Malaysia to the north. Everyone needs an outlet, lest they start murdering prostitutes.

  • avatar
    Gforce

    @rcolayco: I heard there’s a pecking order on the Autobahn, as follows:

    1. Porsche
    2. Mercedes
    3. BMW
    etc (I forgot the lesser ones)

    Any car make lower in the ranks must yield the fast lane to the make above. Silly part is if you’re in a Bimmer and want to pass a Porsche, the (Porsche) driver does not have to yield the fast lane to you.

    Not sure if there is an authority enforcing these though.

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    “You’ll note that Germany, with no speed limits on a significant portion of the Autbahn has a significantly lower highway fatality rate than the US. Why? You don’t eat, talk on the phone, shave your legs, use your laptop, when you’re going 150+ mph.”

    Exactly.
    When i was driving there a year ago, i couldn´t even look at my map.
    Why?
    Because i needed to concentrate on the driving.
    Dense traffic doing ca 150 km/h, with the occasional “pilot” passing at 200-300 km/h

    In my native Sweden, you will often find empty stretches of roads where you can safely look at a map.

  • avatar
    rcolayco

    To kowsnofskia:

    “Please explain what is so “trollish” about this statement (ie, the suggestion to drive your car at the track); after all, it sounds like perfectly reasonable and sound advice to me. Motor enthusiast or not, I’d really rather not be killed by some speeding unlicensed kid tearing along the interstate in his father’s Camaro.”

    No argument here. It certainly makes sense to take your sports car to the track. Not just to blow off some of your natural aggresssion there rather than on a congested road. I do that regularly. The other reason it’s good to track your car is to know how to drive it properly at all speeds. Specially a 911, which has er . . . rather unique handling characteristics.

    But I can’t see where you’re bringing the unlicensed kid exploring the limits of his father’s Camaro on the highway into this discussion. What we’ve been discussing is whether a mature, responsible adult with adequate driving skills ought to indulge in driving his high performance car at high speed on the road. Not all roads, please note. Solowiow was writing about driving his Carrera S on the autobahn.

    To GiddyHitch:

    At some point, I suggest you try driving both a Cayman S as well as a 911. It will be a tough choice. I’ve driven both, on the road as well as on the track (including the Ring). Can’t go wrong on either one. But it’s simply impossible to “get” what Porsche (911/Cayman) loyalists find so special about driving one without doing it yourself. Then you’ll understand.

    Please know that I’m talking about strictly the driving experience itself. Not the admiration and/or envy of others. If that’s a priority, a Ferrari or Lamborghini is much more effective.

    As for driving an Opel or Mazda wagon at 250 kph, . . You’re evidently quite skilled, but please don’t do it again. I’ve taken my Porsche to 349 kph (217 mph, GPS timed not speedo reading) on a deserted road and the thing still felt pretty steady. I lost my nerve in a Volvo wagon at 200 kph.

    Those Audis? They’ve been known as the autobahn bullies for a few years now. Something to do with the monster torque churned out by their turbo-charged diesels in top gear at autobahn speeds.

    And finally, “Sings generally cut loose and act like drunken sailors once they cross into Malaysia to the north. Everyone needs an outlet, lest they start murdering prostitutes.”

    Touche! However, I do take partial exception. You must be referring largely to (mainly Western) expats and wealthy Sings. The average Sing, the guy who’s part of the 90% of the island’s population, who lives in one of those government-provided flats, is for the most part straight-laced and obedient to The Leader’s bidding. We in the rest of the world, . . as you say, do need an outlet lest we start . . .”

    I wish I’d thought of that when responding to A of A. Come to think of it, doesn’t his viewpoint remind you of the argument between those who advocate abstinence vs. contraceptives? . . Oops! Enough – I’ve taken this far enough afield already.

    To Gforce:

    I’m pretty certain the “pecking order” is not prescribed by law. It’s a cultural thing . . . just the way Germans are. Same reason a German won’t cut into the fast lane without making sure there isn’t a Porsche or Benz barreling down at 100 kph faster than
    him.

    And the same reason you don’t want to impatiently overtake the guy in the Bimmer who won’t move over, on his right side. Yes, you wait. I’ve had to do that. Once, an Alpina B5 wouldn’t move over for a few kilometers. But why complain? We were both doing 250 kph. To be fair, at that speed, it would have been tough for him to move into the slower lane without risking rear-ending the slower running cars. Which is why I had to wait patiently till he had a good opening on his right side.

  • avatar
    Martin Schwoerer

    Re: why German freeways are comparatively safe, from a guy who drives there on a weekly basis.

    The autobahns are full of speed limits as low as 60 km/h. And the speed limits are enforced by radar. You can drive stretches of 10-50 miles with no speed limit at all but when there’s a construction site, you better slow down.

    You get points on your licence for driving too fast. 40km/h too fast is I think worth 4 points. You get a quick thirty days driving ban rather quickly, too. Fourteen points or so, and you have to go back to driving school, which is a fucking nuisance and expensive too. Eighteen points, you get your license impounded for half a year. It can take up to five years to get your points erased. I drive like a geriatric case because I have twelve points.

    Police state tactics yes, but it forces you to pay attention. Just a few years ago, I would certainly have lacked the moral fiber to drive a Porsche without losing my license.

  • avatar
    wstansfi

    Captain Mike,
    Beautiful car and a place to drive it – you are the envy of us all.
    I think if you’re going over 300 kph it’s probably more like flying than driving, so I’m in the pilot camp as well.

    @ A is A
    After 60mph, a major collision is nearly certainly a fatal one – the first paper you cited looked at fatalities over 60kph, where odds of survival are much higher – so I say, who cares if you’re going 190? If it’s your day to go, you might as well go with a wide smile on your face and all pistons firing!

  • avatar
    tedward

    “Every time I start the engine of my Toyota”

    Sigh…

  • avatar
    golf4me

    tedward +1

  • avatar
    tedward

    golf4me

    I’ve been struggling all morning to limit my response to that one “sigh…” It’s not going well.

  • avatar
    A is A

    To actively participate in a chat group of motor enthusiasts and call them idiots…

    Sir:

    I called speeders moral idiots.

    Let me state two facts:

    * Not all speeders are motor enthusiasts. Only some of them are.

    * Not all motor enthusiasts are speeders (for instance, me).

    so I say, who cares if you’re going 190? If it’s your day to go, you might as well go with a wide smile on your face and all pistons firing!

    I was not thinking in the speeder at the wheel. Is his/her life. It is his/her to spend. I am a Libertarian. People should be free to do not wear seatbelts, helmets or free to “abuse” any drug. It is not my life, it is theirs.

    I was thinking in that familiy of five in a 1985 VW Golf on the right lane. I was thinking on them diying because a moral idiot crossed their path.

    I was thinking precisely about these deaths:

    http://www.google.es/search?hl=es&q=“Gumball+3000″+”died”+”Volkswagen+Golf”&btnG=Buscar&meta=
    “Every time I start the engine of my Toyota”

    Sigh…

    I love it (not “her”). Yes. My Toyota.

    One man’s theology is another man’s belly laugh, and one man´s “souless and bland Japanese appliance” is another man refined machine. In this case: My Avensis.

    To be sincere, I sometimes aspire to a.. Prius. It so Futuristic, the shape is so efficient. I founf that car…sexy.

  • avatar
    tedward

    A is A

    “I love it (not “her”). Yes. My Toyota.”

    I can respect that, I’ve ended up loving nearly every car I’ve lived with. The two exceptions: an Olds 88 and a ’64 Coronet (utter crap and dangerous to boot, both of them). Most car guys would doubtless agree that auto-love just happens, and our reasons for it are really just after-the-fact justifications.

    If you’re going to call speeders out as “moral idiots” in such a heated fasion I wonder if you’d feel the same way about a lane changer, in fast/tight traffic, not signaling and causing an accident (this almost happened right in front of me yesterday, I-87). At highway speeds that can kill people. Both actions are illegal and unless the first guy is going 190 on a crowded road you could argue that the lane changer is recklessly endangering far more people. I’d say the only difference is that one guy is getting his rocks off and other is merely careless, but that kind of puritanical distinction is often betrayed by an examination of actual consequences.

    My point isn’t that lane changers are more dangerous than speeders (no idea), rather that the road is a dangerous place and nearly everyone contributes to that at times (or all of the time…them be the assholes). An isolated speeding incident really shouldn’t weigh so heavily into a judgement of someone’s moral character. An average of 190mph on the other hand…

  • avatar
    A is A

    If you’re going to call speeders out as “moral idiots” in such a heated fasion…

    No, no, no. No “heated” fashion at all.

    Calling them “moral idiots” was just cold diagnosis.

    …I wonder if you’d feel the same way about a lane changer, in fast/tight traffic, not signaling and causing an accident (this almost happened right in front of me yesterday, I-87)

    Just the same, sir. I “feel” (in fact I diagnose them, feelings are not tools of cognition) just the same

    An Spanish race pilot said that drivers on the road should be more attentive that drivers on the track. After all all drivers in the track go in the same direction and there are not pedestrians, telephone poles of crossings. He was totally right.

  • avatar
    tedward

    A is A

    Ok, I can agree with that then. I raise my eyebrows when someone blows by me (although it dosen’t really bother me until they’re well above 100), just the same as for sloppy lane changers, left laners and distracted drivers. I assumed the “heated” quality based on your use of bold font. Overall my point was more along the lines of “calm down about it, nothing new under the sun” but that dosen’t seem to be at issue now.

    “in fact I diagnose them, feelings are not tools of cognition.” You hard science guys always get this wrong. I say you’re all jealous about the relative lack of work shown down in the psychology and philosophy departments. :)

    That Toyota thing is still making me laugh.


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