By on February 11, 2009

Nissan’s Cube goes on sale this May, and a Nissan Press Release states that a base 6-speed version (what, you wanted the CVT?) will start at $13,999. And even though only 122 hp are on offer fom the Cube’s 1.8 liter four, even a loaded CVT version will weigh less than 2,900 lbs. There’s also something about an expensive special Krõm (Krôm? Kröm? Krøm?) edition. Specifically, “for those consumers that love the cube but are looking for a little something extra, the cube Kr?m (sic) offers that and then some.” Duly noted. But the nausea-inducing corporate enthusiasm doesn’t stop there. “It’s unique, it’s fun, it’s functional, and it makes being “square” hip again,” bubbles Nissan’s Al Castignetti of the cubist wonder. Translation: the Cd rating is 0.35. More pricing, model info and well-compensated enthusiasm to come.

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32 Comments on “Cube Priced...”


  • avatar
    f8

    This should fill the big empty spot in the hearts of xB enthusiasts nicely. I wonder what the gas mileage is like on the Cube.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Between this and the Soul, it is indeed hip to be square.

    Sorry, it’s late and I’m tired.

    Anyone know if this will come with stability control? The Soul does, and it’s pretty much the Cube’s primary competitor.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Ooooh, a shag-carpet dash. Can it get any better?

  • avatar
    Dimwit

    Looks funky and is priced right. Might do well but with this market, who knows.

  • avatar
    Jeff Puthuff

    I read that it only gets about 30mpg highway. I suppose the lounge sofa-style seating makes up for that . . . .

  • avatar
    Tommy

    This is a poor, rounded-corner cube peg that will not fit the xB shaped hole in my heart.

  • avatar

    But officer, I swear it said in the owner’s manual that you can stack these things!

  • avatar
    gakoenig

    No word on that e 4WD system for the US market?

    Honestly, as a little runabout for our business (picking up parts, getting boxes to FedEx, moving junk around), this might just be the perfect vehicle. Inexpensive, probably very reliable, efficient and hip. That e4WD system would make it great for those couple of weeks a year that Portland gets snow.

  • avatar
    shaker

    They’re hoping that this Velveeta Versa sells to… kids? – it actually depends upon how the 50+ demographic views this little box (same as the old xB and the xD); the cheap price, decent gas mileage and high seating position (along with ease of entry/exit) are very desirable to the older set.
    If I start seeing these in the parking lots of Long John Silvers after church on Sunday, I’ll consider myself vindicated.

  • avatar
    NickR

    I like the way the Soul looks more, but this is kind of funky. It will be interesting to see in person.

    the Cd rating is 0.35

    What with drag increasing at the square of speed, having only 122hp is probably a good idea.

  • avatar

    I’ll get pricing for the Cube into TrueDelta’s database by tomorrow, to see how it “stacks up.”

    No feature value adjustment for shag on the IP currently, might have to add that…

    http://www.truedelta.com/prices.php

  • avatar
    lprocter1982

    It looks like a Chevy HHR with two feet lopped off the rear end. I think it’ll suck. Especially if it actually does only get the rumoured 30mpg.

  • avatar
    RayH

    It does look like HHR hooked up with 1st gen xB… I have a salmon-colored accent wall by choice, but I like it. No CVT for me, thank you.

  • avatar

    Ummm…repeat after me: the original Mini weighed 1500 pounds and this is twice that. Of course, the Mini was also one big crush zone, BUT if somebody would focus on building *really* innovative cars instead of cute sheet metal, we might get some real MPG. Americans are so absolutely clueless about microcars. In Europe, where taxation, fuel cost, the nature of roads, etc., etc. conspires to push people to microcars, there is a wealth of them. Until recently they have been anathema in America…so we don’t see the Polo, the Lupo, the Mercedes A series, etc. etc.
    So how about a composite body? And diesel offerings like Europe. My diesel Jetta gets the same mileage as a gas Smart car…
    There Is No Focus On Redefining The American Car, just regens of old themes. It took the parting of the Red Sea to get the Fit/Yaris etc here and we just may get the Polo…all with gas engines.

    Cosmetic changes are the same as none at all: rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. We have an sliced artery here, bandaids will not do

    Show me a new game: a car that gets 70MPG has some decent performance and handling…by virtue of new materials and contruction techniques. In these difficult risky times, I and the rest of America just are NOT going to buy some warmed up leftovers.

  • avatar
    improvement_needed

    steward dean:

    There’s a fine line between small cars and micro cars… – I would put the A series and the polo in the former…

  • avatar
    Dr Lemming

    I’d be more interested in the return of the Honda Civic tall wagon of the late 80s and early 90s. Alas, the Civic has inched up towards the old Accord in size, and the CRV is too tall and heavy to get decent mileage.

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    2,900 pounds. That’s phat.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Of course, the Mini was also one big crush zone, BUT if somebody would focus on building *really* innovative cars instead of cute sheet metal, we might get some real MPG.

    This is an innovative car, but you have to understand that it’s innovation spawned not out of European autobahns, American interstates or the miles-long rural side-roads of each, but out Japanese urban gridlock. It’s only very slightly larger than a kei car, but with more than three times the 600cc displacement limit of the kei class.

    This is a poor, rounded-corner cube peg that will not fit the xB shaped hole in my heart.

    The Cube is one of the most innovative, most visually distinctive cars in it’s class. The problem is that it’s a class Americans and Europeans almost never see. The first-generation (which we never got here) actually predates the first-gen xB.

    Personally, I think the asymmetry is nifty. It’s visually challenging, and I can’t think of very many cars that do the same. Nissan violated a basic assumption and the result is interesting, but not deplorable.

    I read that it only gets about 30mpg highway. I suppose the lounge sofa-style seating makes up for that . . . .

    And once again, we’re focusing on the highway figure of what is, really, a city car. Yes, it’s a box that gets 30mpg at 100km/h, which is not a huge improvement over, say, an Impala or small crossover. But here’s the point: it fits more people and stuff than either and, because of it’s low weight, CVT and small displacement, will get much better city mileage than either.

    That no one even mentions the city mileage is a telling commentary.

    2,900 pounds. That’s phat.

    Yes, it’s 2900lbs. As above, it’s got better capacity and urban mileage than anything that weighs the same or less, and many cars that weigh much more. In North America, there’s nothing excepting the Fit and possibly the Soul that packs this kind of space.

    I’m glad to see this car coming here, and my only wish would be for a three-row version (the Box?). Seriously, as a car for intracity commuters or stay-at-home parents, it, along with the Soul, is brilliant. Quoting highway mileage, shape and lack of power, or saying “why not just buy a Sentra/Rogue” misses the point.

  • avatar
    Paul Niedermeyer

    The old xB weighed 2425 lbs, and had 108hp. And got 33mpg hwy. And came fully equipped for $13.5k. The market is still awaiting a true successor.

  • avatar
    carlisimo

    It may not be as good a small car as the original xB, but it looks like a sculpture on wheels and I love that.

  • avatar
    Johnson Schwanz

    The chick that announced this car at the DC Auto Show was FINE. Fine as the day is long.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    The old xB weighed 2425 lbs, and had 108hp. And got 33mpg hwy. And came fully equipped for $13.5k. The market is still awaiting a true successor.

    The old xB was based on the now-ten-year-old Yaris/Echo platform, which would have struggled to meet competitive requirements for crash safety and performance. And 33mpg is not really much better than 30mpg; it’s about a half-litre every hundred kilometers.

    That said, Toyota is a master when it comes to making mainstream cars that weigh, on average, at least ten percent less than their competition, Honda excepting. The second-gen Toyota bB/Daihatsu Materia is only slightly heavier than the xB with the same powertrain, and a good bit less than the (bigger, faster) Cube.

    I really do think Toyota should use Scion to hock Diahatsus and the occasional euro-spec Avensis in North America, rather than trying to Americanize it. It might not sell all that well, but it ought not to cost much, either.

  • avatar
    Airhen

    Johnson Schwanz :
    February 11th, 2009 at 12:54 pm

    The chick that announced this car at the DC Auto Show was FINE. Fine as the day is long.

    Nice!

    Which reminds me of a post a while back here at TTAC that someone was complaining about hot chicks showing off new cars. What a crazy world we live in. (lol)

  • avatar

    Good price and good spec on a city car. Anyone taking this thing regularly on the highway bought the wrong car. I wish the styling was slightly better, but it honestly isn’t that bad for what it is and most of the shape is a result of functionality, which is something I am totally fine with.

  • avatar

    “only” 2900 lbs?

    2900 lbs is about 500 lbs too much for this car and this motor.

    Civics from the late 90s weighed 2100-2600 lbs, had 1.6L motors and made 106/127/160 hp

    That’s how you get 40 mpg.

  • avatar
    davejay

    If the original xB had come with a sunroof, I would have bought one.

    If this cube had been available when I bought my Versa, I would have bought one (assuming it came with a sunroof.)

    There’s a market for small, tall, efficient cars — and since that means “box” they’ve got to work hard to make it less boring. If you look past all that, you get the mini-est of minivans, and I don’t see anything wrong with that.

  • avatar
    Robstar

    ataksuki> Nothing wrong with 122hp on the highway. Obviously you live in the US :) In the up & coming 3rd world country I’ve been to, I’ve taken a 55hp car on the highway.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Civics from the late 90s weighed 2100-2600 lbs, had 1.6L motors and made 106/127/160 hp

    Can we please stop comparing current cars to cramped, early-nineties soda-can cars with emissions standards that aren’t viable?

  • avatar
    Jeff Puthuff

    (psarhjinian) That no one even mentions the city mileage is a telling commentary.

    It’s especially telling that Nissan’s own press release mentions only the highway mileage.

  • avatar
    Macca

    ^ I’m guessing in the range of 22 to 24 MPG for the urban cycle. The CVT-equipped Versa is rated at 27/33, but is also a little lighter and a little more aerodynamic.

  • avatar
    John Williams

    Can we please stop comparing current cars to cramped, early-nineties soda-can cars with emissions standards that aren’t viable?

    About time. Seriously, if you’re looking for a 40mpg car along these lines, you’re more than welcome to troll the used/pre-owned lots.

  • avatar

    The press release does not mention destination. Looking at previous price releases, they generally don’t include it in the stated price. So the actual base price will be $695 higher.

    No pricing other than base price for the base trim appears to have been released.


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