By on December 30, 2008

Oregon’s governor Ted Kulongoski is currently getting some flack in our comments section over his pay-per-mile road tax scheme. But this is not the only green-oriented plan Kulongoski is floating, having already confirmed that Nissan will provide EVs for the state fleet in 2010. Another controversial transportation proposal of Kulongoski’s is to replace the $1,500 hybrid tax credit with a $5k credit towards the purchase of an all-electric car. If this plan does go into effect, it will make your Tesla Roadster (or Nissan Better Place-mobile) a little more affordable, just be prepared to have your doors blown off by a Datsun 1200 when you hit the road. Check out Oregon Field Guide’s visit with White Zombie, the zero-emissions ass kicker you never saw coming.

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12 Comments on “Oregon’s Races Towards EV Future...”


  • avatar
    Rev Junkie

    In our search for energy independence, my philosophy is “Diff’rent (power) strokes for diff’rent folks.” There is no single sensible replacement for petroleum powered cars. Electrics make the most sense in crowded urban areas, where most time is spent with the motor off, waiting in traffic. For areas with less population density, i.e. Oregon, I say the good ole Internal Combustion Engine prevails. There are plenty of compounds that can push down a piston when ignited by a spark or by compression. Of course, the only substance I can think of that burns but doesn’t produce that evil carbon is hydrogen. Either way, Oregon won’t find a sensible replacement that doesn’t emit CO2. Up next from Oregon’s governor, a breathing tax! Hold your breath, you just might kill a polar bear!

  • avatar
    RedStapler

    I like the “question internal combustion” bumper sticker on the back of the car.

  • avatar
    BMW325I

    Electric cars are irrelevant. 10 hour charge forget it. It will give electric companies the excuse to jack up prices.

  • avatar
    tx_mg_dragon

    Did all the competition at the drag strip agree to start out in second or third gear? Not one of them had a competitive launch.

  • avatar
    Spitfire

    http://www.wrightspeed.com/x1.html

  • avatar
    RogerB34

    A reality of Progressive States like Oregon, is voters become conservative when their pocket books are threatened. Governor promotion of electric cars isn’t slam dunk legislation even in Oregon.

  • avatar
    Edward Niedermeyer

    RogerB34: True dat. On the other hand, Oregon doesn’t have quite the budget problems of, say, California. I think this is mostly about Kulongoski being a term-limited lame-ish duck wanting to be remembered for standing for something. Even he has to know that there’s no way to accomplish everything he’s talking about in two years.

    Burnishing his green cred before moving on to bigger things, I’d say.

  • avatar
    Fritz

    BMW325I;
    That may have been true two years ago, but the world is changing. EEStor, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EEStor may have a electric storage technology that consigns gas engines to the ash heap of history. And I’m glad of it. Gas engines are pigs with 100 years of lipstick on them. Look, I’ve rebuilt a dozen engines over the years and enjoy watching a steam locomotive roar down the track as much as anyone. Past time to put this technology out to pasture also. I won’t be interested in cars again until some thing radically new and improved comes out.

  • avatar
    Fritz

    That is one great video. I wonder how many miles an EV1 with EEStor technology in it could drive on one charge.

  • avatar

    tx_mg_dragon : Did all the competition at the drag strip agree to start out in second or third gear? Not one of them had a competitive launch.

    None of them were drag-prepped…that Datsun launched like it had slicks or drag radials.

    I guess its great for EV bragging rights, but the Vette next to it isn’t much slower with the right driver, equal tires, and luxuries like a stereo, A/C, power everything…which I seriously doubt are in the Datsun. And it has a range of 350-400 miles. And (insert statement about Corvette’s great fuel economy) is worth mentioning.

  • avatar
    the duke

    Ahh, the street legal drags at PIR. Brings back memories.

    Never met the owner, but that car has been around forever – I remember reading in the Oregonian about it smoking Vipers in the mid 90’s. But like was mentioned, this is a drag prepped car, with a skilled driver (note he doesn’t drive it himself) competing against stock street cars with inexperienced drivers. I’ve been to many races there, and most drivers don’t know reaction time from Miller time.

    Dedicated drag calls always win, be it EV or otherwise. And that M3 has a good 1000 lbs (or more) on the Datsun.

    What you said RogerB34 is true about Oregonians on some levels – “Sales Tax” is considered political suicide in the state. On the other hand, Multnomah county will approve any income tax increase that builds unneeded libraries (I’m not opposed to Libraries, just when they rebuild perfectly good ones in place of the old one) and sends money to parks. But the rest of the state is more agricultural and not so left leaning in spending.

    In fact, to my knowledge, only Multnomah county (which Portland is in) requires vehicle emissions checks. The rest of the state does not. But you can get around emission checks in Portland. Just buy an eighties Subaru with four wheel drive (or any 4WD vehicle pre – OBD II). There is no OBD port and the test stations don’t have four wheel dynos so as long as your car does not put out visible smoke you get a pass.

  • avatar
    improvement_needed

    great to see different technology / points of view, but the whole ‘holier than though – sound bites for tv’ take everything down an order of magnitude…


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