By on October 31, 2008

Faced with one of the tightest budget crunches in its history, the state of Arizona is wasting no time in deploying its newly authorized freeway speed cameras. Redflex Traffic Systems runs the photo radar program in return for an expected cut of $20,361,300. In Phoenix, the Australian company has activated a number of fixed camera systems in the past week. Seven cameras are now active on Interstate 10, seven on the 101 and three on 51. In Mesa, three cameras are ready to begin ticketing on 60. In total, Redflex expects to deploy 100 fixed and mobile cameras. Each camera can generate thousands of $181 tickets for the state’s general fund. The state estimates that fiscal 2009 will see 428,839 citations worth $77.6 million. In the following year, the number will grow to 571,785 tickets worth $103,493,085. The state’s contract with Redflex provides an option to double the revenue by increasing the total number of cameras to 200.

Video taken by a local activist shows an entire fleet of mobile camera SUVs being prepared in the Australian company’s parking lot, all painted in the colors of an official highway patrol vehicle. The employee section of the Redflex parking lot showed no signs of a budget crunch. Vehicles included an $80k BMW 7-series and BMW Z4 convertible. As Redflex has the first choice of deciding who is and is not guilty of speeding under the new freeway program, employees have the technical ability to exempt themselves from automated speeding tickets. This may be a side benefit to the Redflex worker with a personalized license plate reading: REVHEAD.

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23 Comments on “Arizona Freeway Speed Cameras Deploy Statewide...”


  • avatar
    Airhen

    Well at least they’ll have pictures of the illegals speeding away in vans from the border. Now will the Mexican government pay those tickets?

  • avatar

    I am so glad my 80mph drive on I-10 through AZ was done in early 2007. I in no way want to feed that blatant cash grab, so if I ever need to do a return drive, I-40 will be a better choice.

  • avatar
    kansei

    HtownHeff –well since the speed limit on almost all of I-10 is 75mi/hr, no worries. It’s just in Phoenix and Tucson that the limit drops (to 55-65 depending on exact location).

    I’m just pissed that traffic congestion has been awful the past few weeks while they installed a ton more speed cameras.

    check http://www.azphotoradar.com/index.php for a map of the Phoenix speed cameras. This only includes highway cameras, not the maaaaany speed cameras, red light cameras, etc all over Tempe and Scottsdale.

  • avatar
    nuclearay

    I guess cutting spending is too easy of an answer.

  • avatar
    Juniper

    Damn Red States

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Thanks for the head’s up on this. Taking the family to Phx for Thanksgiving and will ensure I go the limited speed.

    + 1 for Nuclearay

  • avatar
    ihatetrees

    How long before nav systems include locations of every known camera? There’s gotta be a market developing…

  • avatar
    creamy

    “As Redflex has the first choice of deciding who is and is not guilty of speeding under the new freeway program, employees have the technical ability to exempt themselves from automated speeding tickets. This may be a side benefit to the Redflex worker with a personalized license plate reading: REVHEAD.”

    fuck. outsourcing the law.

  • avatar
    AG

    Ok, now how about a law banning car insurance companies from raising rates based on speeding tickets issued by speed cameras?

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    Private enterprise executing and profiting from law enforcement is truely the marriage of state and corporation that fits with a widely report quote of Mussolini’s definition of fascism.
    This is flat out wrong.
    This is a complete perversion of the law. Speed laws exist for (supposed) safety. Now they exist to generate revenue? I call Bullshit!
    I am no lawyer, but it would seem some sort of legal case could be made against this practice. It is a clear misapplication of the law.
    I wonder if they use standard legal (radar detectable) radar frequencies?

  • avatar
    Redbarchetta

    I’m going to ask this question again. I am totally against these speed cameras but this is something that really bothers me about them especially in this case.

    WHY DO THE STATE GOVERNMENTS HAVE TO OUTSOURCE THIS TO A PRIVATE COMPANY FROM ANOTHER COUNTRY.

    They couldn’t even try and work with a company based in the US so at least the profits from these “taxes” would stay here and employ AMERICANS. It’s not like they even tried since all the stuff I read about Redflex tells me they are a bunch of corrupt bastards, I guess they go hand and hand with the corrupt government.

    Is Obama going to cut tax benefits to the state of Arizona because they are outsourcing the red light and speed cameras, like he said he was going to do to private organizations that outsource jobs. Of course not, the hypocritical example in Michigan should tell you that, send jobs to Mexico and S. Korea get Bailout Billions to save executive jobs.

  • avatar
    John B

    The NDP government (socialist) installed photo radar in Ontario in 1994. During the 1995 election, one of the campaign promises of the Conservatives was to abolish photo radar – which they promptly did within days of winning the election. While photo radar wasn’t a key issue, I expect it was enough to entice voters away from the Liberals and certainly the NDP. Even though the Liberals have one the last two provincial elections, no one dares mention photo radar.

    Any chance of that happening in Arizona?

  • avatar
    fallout11

    You know, the more I think about this the more it burns me up. It’s not a far step from this to contracting/hiring bandits to wait on the side of the road and rob unsuspecting travelers.

  • avatar
    afuller

    The system in AZ doesn’t use radar but rather sensors embedded in the roadway to determine speed.

    In AZ when you get one of these tickets you are merely required to pay the ticket. If you do so there will be no points awarded to your license and your insurance company doesn’t need to know. To me this means that as long as you have the cash you need not fear to speed.

  • avatar
    Wolven

    You know, the more I think about this the more it burns me up. It’s not a far step from this to contracting/hiring bandits to wait on the side of the road and rob unsuspecting travelers

    Correction: There is no “step”… It IS HIRING BANDITS to BUSHWACK American citizens.

    It’s time to wake up and realize we are in a war with the Guv’ment… and, currently, we’re LETTING them win.

  • avatar
    Areitu

    Is it strange that I find Arizona one of the states whose residents would be most opposed to this sort of thing?

  • avatar
    readingthetape

    In my experience, a careful daub of mud on the license plate foils these tickets. It’s not illegal to have mud on your car.

  • avatar
    cgd

    I’m looking you, John McCain, this is your home state. Aren’t conservatives supposed to be against this sort of thing? Why are we handing over our civil rights and privacy to Homeland Security and outsourced law? This is wrong, wrong, wrong.

  • avatar
    schicklgrueber

    We can put these guys out of business within a year or two. Simply put, NOBODY speeds where the cameras are in use and the revenue stream dries up. I know, I know, but it IS possible not to speed. Perhaps someone can design a device to sense the cameras ahead of time and cut the speed of the car. I don’t see any other way to stick it to these B……s

  • avatar
    RogerB34

    Drive the limit or less best solution.
    Cameras a way to control anarchy on the highway.
    Good idea.

  • avatar
    Xennady

    McCain is a US senator and has no legal authority over the government of the state of Arizona. The governor of that state is democrat Janet Napolitano.
    Blame her for the cameras, not McCain.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    The governor of that state is democrat Janet Napolitano.
    Blame her for the cameras, not McCain.

    Legislators create laws — governors can only lobby for what they want and veto what they oppose.

    Both chambers of the Arizona state legislature are majority Republican.

  • avatar
    jenny

    i came up with some questions on the way they implemented this. if you look at ADOT, they’re all about alleviating congestion, manage freeway conditions, etc.. They have good intentions, but the system is so flawed that they didn’t really think of how to address some scenarios. Imagine, they’ve got 55&65mph limit on i-10 alone.. Worst of all is that the speed limit changes all through out.. atleast from where i saw – Dysart to Mesa alone, it changes from 55 to 65 mph – so tricky! congestion & manage freeway conditions etc HA!


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