By on August 26, 2008

But does it come with a coffee and donut dispenser?First the Ranger gets a new lease on life and now the Crown Victoria Police Interceptor follows suit. According to a Ford-issued memorandum via its "Government Sales Manager", the loyal soldier that's financed Dearborn's D3-bodied crater is confirmed for production until 2011. According to the release (via Police Fleet Manager ) the "new" Interceptor gets standard power adjustable pedals and seat-mounted head airbags. Looks like Ford found a way around the curtain airbags, keeping bad guys locked away in the back seat with the cop's noggin still protected in a side impact or rollover. Besides getting the ancient Panther Platform to comply with the mandatory head protection requirements, maybe Mullaly and Co. actually believe in process improvement. Or not. Our own RobertSD knows the way Fordward is with a new global RWD platform now set for a 2012 release. For its sake, it better be a brick shithouse, cause its got some mighty big shoes to fill.

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47 Comments on “Crown Vic Police Car Gets Stay of Execution...”


  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    When a vehicle is as old, as well-known and as cheap to repair as the Vic, it doesn’t actually have to be reliable.

    It just has to be cheap.

    That’s the problem any Panther pretender has to contend with: the reason the Panther is unpleasant (and let’s be honest, it’s a terrible car for most people) is because it’s old and crude. The reason it’s cheap and easy to fix is because it’s old and crude. Anything newer is, by design, not going to be as old or crude.

    The Charger, for example, is a thoroughly modern car. It’s also more expensive to fix and maintain, even if it’s more pleasant and (from the perspective of a normal buyer, not a gearhead or fleet manager) a more reliable car. Ditto any new Ford, even if it’s rear-drive.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Several friends have purchased these from police auctions (taken out of service @ 100,000 miles) and run them for an additional 100,000+ without much fuss. With the added advantage of watching everybody on the interstate dive for the slow lane as you approach. Supposedly the highway gas mileage isn’t bad either.

  • avatar
    NickR

    I am glad it’s still going to be around for a while. Watching cops on’Cops’ pull the what-the-hell-do they-call-it manouver to spin the perps car around wouldn’t be the same without the Crown Vic.

    I inherited one of these from my dad. It offered one distinct advantage in Toronto. NO ONE cuts you off.

  • avatar
    P71_CrownVic

    Maybe Ford realized that if they cancel the Panthers…they won’t have any money to continue with their D3 experiments (Lincoln Taurus, Flex, Lincoln Flex, etc).

    I have heard, from employees at the plant, that Ford can nail a Panther car together for between $9K and $12K ($9K for a stripped P71 Crown Vic, and $12K for a loaded Town Car). Then, they sell them from anywhere between $17K and $21K at fleet prices. Ford is making a killing on these cars. There is no doubt in my mind that the Panther platform is their most profitable platform. And, despite what some say, they are great cars. They are easy to work on, durable as hell, reliable as hell, and with the 2.73 civilian rear gears, they will get 30MPG on the highway. Where else can you find a RWD, V8, 30MPG, full size car that, slightly used, will cost you $12K?

    At a time when even the blue oval is mortgaged, Ford needs all of the profits they can get…and the Panthers are the key to their sustainability in the very short term. Do I think they are past their prime? Yes (due to Ford’s complete mismanagement of the platform). Do I think that Ford desperately needs the money from this platform right now? Yes.

    Ford is not making ANY money on ANY D3 cars (too many refreshes and not enough sales).

  • avatar

    Not enough of these enrolled in my survey to provide a reliability stat, but I doubt they’re unreliable. The powertrain tends to last forever, as seen in cabs with 400k+ on them. And Ford has had many years to work the kinks out of the other bits.

  • avatar
    P71_CrownVic

    Nick R:

    I am glad it’s still going to be around for a while. Watching cops on’Cops’ pull the what-the-hell-do they-call-it manouver to spin the perps car around wouldn’t be the same without the Crown Vic.

    That would be the PIT maneuver. It stands for Pursuit Intervention Technique.

    And going off of what indi500fan said…a Crown Vic can survive 100K of police use, then go on to another 200K-300K as a taxi and it survives with only minimal maintenance.

    Anyone with 10 minutes on their hands should read the two thinks linked below.

    The first link is on how cabbies can get 300K out of the CVPI. The articles talks with Checker Werks can company in Chicago and how they keep their fleet of 1300 Cabs rolling.

    The second link is about a book that was written by a gentleman who, after 9/11, decided that he would drive cross country rather than fly. His mode of transport, a 2003 Crown Vic. He put 465,015 miles on it.

    http://www.hendonpub.com/resources/articlearchive/details.aspx?ID=373

    http://www.carbuyersnotebook.com/archives/2006/09/the_crown_vic_t.htm#more

  • avatar
    menno

    Had the earliest year Town Car with the OHC V8, and aside from constant problems from just about everything you can name, it was a good enough car (sarcasm alert). OK I can think of two things I liked; the highway mileage was good (upper 20′s) and the leather was nice.

    Unfortunately for FoMoCo, it was my LAST blue oval product ever, because I figured if this was the best they could do, and it was their top of the line car (admittedly bought used with 50,000 miles on it) – then I was better off elsewhere.

    Also, NOBODY wanted the thing – and that was in 1987. I finally broomed it in trade for a 1997 Chevrolet Cavalier (0.9% interest over 48 months) which ended up to be – going from the fying pan into the fire. (My LAST General Messup car).

    After that, I traded the Cavalier (good name for the entire company and Chevy dealers, in fact) for a 1999 Dodge Neon.

    What’s next after going from the frying pan into the fire? Needless to say, that was my LAST mopar product.

  • avatar
    plunk10

    Mr. Karesh- I’m willing to bet the reason not many are enrolled in your panel is that most buyers of CrownVic/GrandMarquis do not use the internet, or well beyond the age of the internet savvy.

    I know a guy that just bought a 2008 Grand Marquis last weekend for $18K+ new. He’ll be 70 years old in about 6 months.

  • avatar
    Lumbergh21

    So, Menno, I understand that you’ve imported a Chery from China. How’s that working out? ;-)

    I’m actually happy to see that the Crown Vic is going to soldier on at least one more year. Police enforcement just wouldn’t be the same without it.

  • avatar
    AG

    I’ve gotten fairly good at distinguishing Police Interceptors from old people, but some people still drive old cop cars *with the spotlights still on them*

    I find that really irritating.

  • avatar

    [Independent] taxi drivers will rejoice. They can buy PI’s secondhand on the cheap, and they’re equally as cheap and easy to maintain; all of which justifies the price of gas they funnel into the armor-protected, constantly draining fuel tanks.

    The first cabbie who gets to pay for a new battery for his Escape Hybrid will be screaming obscenities in six languages.

  • avatar
    1169hp

    “psarhjinian”
    The Vic is “Unreliable” and “Terrible”. Hardly!!

    Crude. Huh. Last time I drove a Vic it was smooth and quite. It’s just a very basic large car, but hardly crude.
    1986 Yugo. That’s crude.

    I drove/abused police package Vics on duty from 96′ to 06′. I recall just one nagging issue that Ford eventully retified. The transmission didn’t appreciate having to shift from 3rd to 4th (a.k.a. overdrive) at over 100mph. Eventually, after a year or so abuse, some band in the tranny gave up and you no longer had 4th. Off to the dealer, as it was under warrarty until 36k. At the time we kept our patrol cars to 50k.

    Rant over.
    DT

  • avatar

    Everyone who said these cars are crude are absolutely correct, in fact I would say it’s an understatement. Virtually any car these days is quiet and can have a compliant ride, that’s not much of an accomplishment. The Crown Vic is a lumberwagon, but also a cheap workhorse which keeps the need for it alive.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Not enough of these enrolled in my survey to provide a reliability stat, but I doubt they’re unreliable

    They’re not unreliable in the same way that an F150 or Silverado aren’t unreliable. Which is not, I’d like to point out, the same way that a Corolla is not unreliable. Little things go wrong on these cars. Those little things don’t matter to fleet buyers, but a “normal” consumer can be really intolerant of minor problems.

    Crude. Huh. Last time I drove a Vic it was smooth and quite. It’s just a very basic large car, but hardly crude.

    The steering is loose, the ride floppy with the standard shocks and crusty in the CVPI, the noises unpleasant (though muted), the ergonomics dated, the non-CVPI handling is terrible, the mileage/performance balance would have been ok in 1995, the IIHS crash performance is inexcusable for a car this big and the materials and assembly challenge the Sebring.

    It’s cramped, too, which is perverse given it’s size. You think the Impala is an example of poor packaging? Hah! Not next to the Panthers.

    But it’s not “crude” like an economy car, true. It’s crude next to a Charger, or even an Impala. If I wasn’t a fleet buyer, I’d be nuts to buy this car over a Camry, Malibu, Taurus or Accord–or even the aforementioned Impala–because it just not a pleasant car to drive.

    This car isn’t a dinosaur. It’s more a crocodile or shark: an evolutionary throwback that exists only because it’s the best fit to it’s niche.

    I think a lot of gearheads have a blind spot for this car. I can appreciate it for what it is, but it gets a pass way too often.

  • avatar
    86er

    menno:
    Had the earliest year Town Car with the OHC V8, and aside from constant problems from just about everything you can name, it was a good enough car (sarcasm alert). OK I can think of two things I liked; the highway mileage was good (upper 20’s) and the leather was nice.

    Unfortunately for FoMoCo, it was my LAST blue oval product ever, because I figured if this was the best they could do, and it was their top of the line car (admittedly bought used with 50,000 miles on it) – then I was better off elsewhere.

    Also, NOBODY wanted the thing – and that was in 1987.

    Something about your story doesn’t wash. The 1991 Town Car was the first to use the modular OHC 4.6L V8.

    Come again?

  • avatar
    NulloModo

    I don’t really think it is fair to rate the reliability of a vehicle you have purchased used, especially used with 50,000 miles, as you don’t really know how well the original driver took care of the car, whether they performed regular scheduled maintenance, whether they left it out in the rain with the windows down one day, etc.

    I haven’t driven a Crown Vic anytime recently, but I have driven Mercury Grand Marquis and Lincoln Town Cars. The steering is a bit vague in slow driving, but I wouldn’t call them noisy or crude, just a distant V8 burble if you listen.

    Also, all of the panther platform cars are very safe – just check out the ratings on safecar.gov, all five stars with the side airbags, and all fives and fours without.

    The handling is definately not sporty, and I find the seats a bit too couch-like, but for a long distance highway cruiser, these cars can’t be beat. I’d rather drive 100+ miles in a GM, TC, or CV than a Camry, Avalon, Accord, or Impala anyday.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    I remember a guy who used to autocross his Grand Marquis. “Cop brakes, cop engine, cop suspension,” he used to say when people asked him about it.

    If he can hustle that thing through the cones averaging times that would make you check the stopwatch twice, then the handling can’t be that bad.

  • avatar
    KnightRT

    They are easy to work on, durable as hell, reliable as hell, and with the 2.73 civilian rear gears, they will get 30MPG on the highway

    Not in my experience. My family had a 2000 and a 2001, and two more from the previous generation. Mileage around town was in the low teens. On the highway, no better than 25 MPG, and often quite a bit less.

  • avatar
    shiney

    psarhjinian : “because it just not a pleasant car to drive.”

    Are you sure you have driven one? Panther platforms are very pleasant to drive! Not sporty, but certainly pleasant. My mother has had 2 Grand Marquis and a Town Car, and I am always stunned at how well they drive. And all of them have been totally bulletproof, the only real issue being water stains from the vinyl top on the town car. No window failures, no engine problems, dead reliable parked outside in Texas heat and through cold winters in the upper Midwest. I own mostly Benzs and BMWs, but I think the Panthers handle decently, and I have never noticed excessive play in the steering – of course no steering feel either…

  • avatar
    ambulancechaser

    i love it when people criticize cars like this for not having scalpel sharp handling or modern European styled interiors. its a PI vic, not an M5!

  • avatar
    monkeyboy

    Consider the pot thoroughly stirred…

    “When a vehicle is as old, as well-known and as cheap to repair as the Vic, it doesn’t actually have to be reliable.

    It just has to be cheap.”

    Not quite. I’ve been to the West Coast Police trials in Pomona and it’s a week long thrash to kill the vehicles submitted. Every manufacturer submits entrees: Except the Asians.

    They have enough business or don’t have a proper offering. I’ll go with the latter.

    These vehicles have to handle, or at least able to BE handled reasonably. Must be roomy, high weight capacity, and electrically robust. The last requirement likely eliminated the foreigners. If you do see a foreign law enforcement vehicle, it was a confiscation vehicle.

    The Crown Vic has had numerous law suits for the Pinto type fire thing on rear impact. We in AZ had one officer Jason Schecter almost killed in a firey crash. He now is in the push to rid the roads of the Crown Vic.

    No matter.

  • avatar
    taxman100

    I love my Grand Marquis – my second one.

    My 7 month old son loves it too – he is normally asleep within a quarter mile of being in the vehicle when driving home in the evening.

    I’ve had 3 child seats in the back seat – they easily fit. Try that with most other sedans.

    The Crown Vic has been tested and tested again at speeds up to 75 mph – with all the blood-sucking attorney’s out there, and as long as they have been on the road, if there was an unusual problem, it would be off the road by now. If every vehicle in which someone was killed was banned, we’d all never leave home.

    I’m buying one more Grand Marquis in 2011 – the problem is my current 2002 will only have around 127,000 miles on it by then, which is premature to get rid of a Grand Marquis.

  • avatar
    johnny ro

    Good car to fool around in back seat. Takes one back to young days, going to drive in etc. Different than in some minivan, compact or other modern conveyance.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Are you sure you have driven one? Panther platforms are very pleasant to drive!

    About three years ago I was in and out of various rentals daily for about six months in various cities. Of the full-sizers (which we got to tow around four consultants and our gear) the Chrysler Intrepid was by far the best, followed by the Impala/Century/Regal and last the Grand Marquis. The Panther was outclassed in every way: space, power/efficiency, ride and trim, especially by the Intrepid (though, admittedly, the Chrysler’s 3.5 wasn’t a winner)

    Put it this was: the Intrepid had better ride control, steering and handling. The Impala and Regal actually rode more softly, but without nearly the pitch and jitter–the steering sucked on these, mind you. The Panther was easily worst: sloppier, less refined, less controlled, sucked gas like a fiend and didn’t actually fit that much stuff.

    I’m not averse to a soft-riding car, but these are a stellar example of why body-on-frame has been abandoned as a car platform.

    i love it when people criticize cars like this for not having scalpel sharp handling or modern European styled interiors. its a PI vic, not an M5!

    It’s not the PI Vic that I’m criticizing, it’s the retail CV/GM/TC. The Vic makes perfect sense as a police cruiser or taxi, but outside of that very specialized niche, it’s just not that good.

    And no, it’s not an M5, and that’s ok. But (and this my experience) it’s even not Chevy Impala. Unless you need a car with body-on-frame construction and robust, if crude, suspension, it’s outclassed as a daily driver.
    I’ve had 3 child seats in the back seat – they easily fit. Try that with most other sedans.

    I’m six foot eight and can fit better in a front seat of a Toyota Yaris, and the back seat of a Toyota Camry or Honda Accord. That’s shamefully wasteful of space.

    Also, all of the panther platform cars are very safe – just check out the ratings on safecar.gov, all five stars with the side airbags, and all fives and fours without.

    Check the IIHS ratings, which are a little bit more real-world accurate. Side impact scores are poor without airbags, and marginal with. Side-impact scores aren’t directly comparable between classes, but this score is behind the Honda Fit and Nissan Versa.

    That frame might be strong, but the bodyshell crumples like a tin can. It’s an old design, and it shows.

    I remember a guy who used to autocross his Grand Marquis. “Cop brakes, cop engine, cop suspension,” he used to say when people asked him about it.

    “I just get out of prison, and what does my brother pick me up in?”

    Every Panther fan brings up the CVPI as if it’s virtues apply to the standard car. They don’t. Yes, you can modify the standard Panther to police spec or better and it improves the numbers, but the ride becomes thoroughly awful in the process.

    Again, it’s a good fleet or cop car. It’s a bad car for the general public. If Ford keeps it on that’s ok, but I don’t think we should pretend that it’s a “good car” for anything excepting those very specific situations.

  • avatar
    P71_CrownVic

    Monkeyboy:
    We in AZ had one officer Jason Schecter almost killed in a firey crash. He now is in the push to rid the roads of the Crown Vic.

    That guy is a fool. The CVPI is a perfectly safe car (matching the Ford Taurus in crash test ratings…yes, the same Ford Taurus that is Ford’s safest car), and is the ONLY car tested to a 75MPH rear impact.

  • avatar
    Accords

    Hmmm

    Anything good about the current Taurus is Volvo’s doing.

    They designed the frame. They crash tested it. They engineered it to crash properly.

    Ford has nothing to do with the current Taurus.. except for its botched name, and history. Not to mention, the factory that got canned cause of it.

    I can go on.. about how Mo Fo Co botched the Taurus.. but I will leave it at.. that.

  • avatar
    hwyhobo

    psarhjinian wrote:
    the ergonomics dated

    I beg to differ. It doesn’t have the useless central console with 100 buttons, and it does have the auto shifter where God intended it – out of the way. Those two alone win it huge points in my book.

    the mileage/performance balance would have been ok in 1995

    At least as good on the freeway as most sedans on the road today.

    It’s cramped, too, which is perverse given it’s size

    Certainly not up front. I am 6’3″, 190 lbs, and for me it is one of the most comfortable cars in existence short of MBs and big Jaguars.

    Oh, and the handling is better that any rental Camry I have driven.

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    Very interesting from both sides. I was seriously considering a Panther due to the dearth of adjustable pedal cars. Frankly I’m still undecided.

    QOTD from me: Name all the cars that have adjustable pedals.

    Panthers
    Chargers
    Anything else? Ferraris? The SLR? The Veryon? Anything?

  • avatar
    andyinsdca

    I had a 91 CVPI that had the 351W/4 barrel Holley and that thing was GODDAMN FAST. It weighed as much as a battleship, handled pretty good for a ship that size (the General XP2000 Pursuit tires were only good for about 25K mi, tho). I got in the high-13s on the 1/4 mi with it. The mileage was in the low 20s on the freeway and had the added advantage of not being pulled over when I drove it with my friends (all of us in the Navy, with short haircuts…we looked like The Man in it, and people waved at us like we were The Man).

    As long as cops have tons of crap in their cars (a radio or 2, the computer, a shotgun, the gear to work the sirens) and their ass with the Sam Browne with tons of crap, a big sedan with a bench seat can never be really replaced.

  • avatar
    jjacob9105

    I’m happy to read about this. But I’m with Taxman100: odds are my ’97 will still be running by 2011. But if something fatal happened to it, I would buy another.

    It’s interesting how the competition from GM and Chrysler don’t fare as well.

  • avatar
    BlisterInTheSun

    I learned how to threshold brake, perform bootleg and j-turns, and really haul ass in one of these back in ’94. I test-drove one two years ago and smoked my buddy in his hopped-up ’94 Sentra SE-R in a set of twisties where he should have eaten me alive. Just goes to show, it’s not the tool, but the driver with actual training and experience who can make a car perform – and my buddy has numerous drag racing trophies to his credit in that Nissan with a massaged SR20DE and stripped-out interior.
    These cars rock, period. At 6’4″ I have plenty of room, and some manufacturers should really consider the convenience of a column-shifting automatic and NO center console.

  • avatar

    I don’t really care how crappy they might be – I’d happily pick up an ex-police CV and hop up the motor for a silly sleeper. With bull bars, black steelies, tinted windows, grille lights, all in lane-clearing FBI grey. For me that’s the appeal, a cheap visually imposing barge that has a huge aftermarket following and makes a good basis for a sleeper.

    That being said, I ride a sport bike, so my daily driver doesn’t need to be a razor sharp canyon carver. The bike fills that role. I like something comfy, big, with a growly torque addled V8 to soothe my nerves and blow off ricers.

  • avatar
    Kent in O.C.

    @ taxman100:

    Let’s hope for your sake, in 2011, that FoMoCo will still be selling Panthers at retail, if you want another one to replace your 2002 Grand Marquis. What with the recent realignment of Mercury into small upscale cars (anything bigger than the Milan and the Mariner is getting the boot), and the consignment of the Crown Vic and Town Car to the fleet market, I don’t know how you could get one retail by the time 2011 rolls around. Supposedly 2009 is the last year of the Grand Marquis in Mercury showrooms, and you can’t even get one off the Mercury lot–they have to be specially ordered.

    This does raise the question, though: there may not be a ton of people who crave Panthers, but how hard could it be for FoMoCo to keep making some for retail, even if you have to specially order it?

    When Ford of Canada axed the Grand Marquis as the last Panther (not to mention Mercury!) available for retail sales last year in the Great White North, they seemed to think that all of their customers who desired a large 4-door sedan would automatically flock to the Taurus. Some have done so, I’m sure–but others have probably gone elsewhere. (Although–where? Somehow a Chevy Impala or a Chrysler 300 doesn’t convey the same message…)

  • avatar
    big_gms

    Count me in as a fan of the Panther platform cars. When it comes time to retire my 1991 Buick LeSabre-and that time is coming sooner rather than later-I am seriously considering a Crown Vic or Grand Marquis. I’m in agreement with a couple others here: I like the column shift and I LOVE the absence of the space eating center console stack. That last thing in particular is big with me…in most late model cars I’ve been in, my leg is always up against that goddamn stack. The CV and GM are unabashedly old school and I like ‘em that way. And for the record, I’m not an old grandpa; I happen to be a 34 year old who loves grandpa cars!

  • avatar
    taxman100

    Kent in O.C. :

    I’ve heard the same thing about the Grand Marquis being special order only – but a couple of dealerships in town have new 2009 Retail units in stock, so maybe they are just “limited availability”, like the 07 Town Car.

    I believe 2009 is the last year for the retail Town Car – Ford has not said what year is last for the GM, but there is no doubt it is coming soon. I’d call my dealer, but Ford bought them out in June, so they no longer exist.

    With my supplier discount, and loyalty rebate, it gets the price down substantially from retail. You just have to be the type who keeps their vehicles a long time, as the Panther will last and last.

  • avatar

    Wow, nice to see this much traffic on this blog post!

    taxman: I’ve heard the same thing about the Grand Marquis being special order only – but a couple of dealerships in town have new 2009 Retail units in stock, so maybe they are just “limited availability”, like the 07 Town Car.

    I believe 2009 is the last year for the retail Town Car – Ford has not said what year is last for the GM, but there is no doubt it is coming soon. I’d call my dealer, but Ford bought them out in June, so they no longer exist.

    Ford’s been coy about the Panther’s life expectancy ever since the D3 hit the market in 2005. They want to wean you off, but they need your money. Expect another last-minute decision to sell retail Town Cars for ’10 just like they did for ’09.

    I say this because the STAP line needs more than the CVPI to stay busy…and we all know that Ford sells every last Townie and Marquis they pop out.

  • avatar
    Stingray

    This article reminds me the old GM B-body cars: Caprice/Impala/Roadmaster etc…

    I agree with this decision.

    I would like that those B-bodied cars were still around.

  • avatar
    Busbodger

    psarhjinian : About three years ago I was in and out of various rentals daily for about six months in various cities. Of the full-sizers (which we got to tow around four consultants and our gear) the Chrysler Intrepid was by far the best

    I have a friend who is a local police chief and they are replacing their “young” Intrepids with used Crown Vics b/c the Intrepids are having so many troubles. Back when I worked for said Chief I spent the night guarding a burnt building (against looters and reflash) while sitting in an Intrepid and it did have a nice interior. One problem that bothered me and that her current patrolmen hate is the roofline. It is hell to get in and out of.

    I have to wonder why Ford doesn’t take the existing Ford engine, tranny, suspension, mechanicals, and things like HVAC, door latches, hinges, etc and just rework the Panther platform. They know everything lasts and lasts – just bolt all those “invisible” pieces to a new chassis and body with a relocated gas tank. Give it a new look but keep the older designed hidden bits that have been so well tested over the years.

    They have to redesign the chassis and body and interior but the end result requires very little time to prove itself to be equal or better to the original Crown Vic.

    Whatever gas prices are there will be services who need these large cars.

    I agree the interior is really cramped for such a large car. The new design could address that.

    For example a Ford 500 (refuse to call the 500 a Taurus) style body on a Panther style chassis. The custom car guys do rebodies all the time. Of course it would require more engineering than that but the current 500 body has a better placed gas tank and AWD so I know that Ford could still run a driveshaft to the back with a relocated gas tank.

    Whatever the case a big pursuit car is a much better idea than a big pursuit SUV…

  • avatar
    Accords

    Hmmmm…

    Trying to be asthetic and remove the brand from the vehicle here…

    The Town Car, C.V and G.M have been the same car… for going on 20yrs. (As long as Ive known about their combined existance.)

    I have an idea of the 12figs involved to make a new platform. The Panther.. I believe has been around a good.. 30yrs.

    I cant say I know whats being sold retail at the Local Linc Merc dealership.. I have an allergy associated with them.. its called disgust.

    They cant just take those same pick up points and make them re-exist on a whole new car. Its.. pretty much impossible to make a new car.. with the old parts. Its one thing to take parts from a damaged car and replace them with new parts.. but the whole car.. needs to be redone.

    And it wont happen.

    The 6 passenger vehicle.. with that sofa / barcalounger in the backseat and jittery suspension and poor design has bitten the dust. It could make sense to brign over the Holden Commodore and underpin the majority of what needs that much room.. but theyd have to design new bodies for it.. instead of slapping a front clip and a badge on..

    But the current Taurus is a joke. So is the 500. technically.,.. the moron who drafted the 500… used to work for AUDI / VW. So… ya can call the 500 a Passat. Its not a Taurus. Its not a 500… its a Passat. And I feel bad for the poor bastards,… who bought that POS.

    As for as the Intripid goes…

    The body was designed interestingly. I happen to love the design and was amazed at it. As far as getting in and out.. ya a bit more reclined and I believe that aims at a higher drag coefficient.

    The packaging of the interior space is decent.

    But I do believe the Intripid was a front driver.. a bit hard to compare the constrains of a rwd car.. vs fwd.

  • avatar
    blautens

    I might be missing something here, but does this indicate that Ford will still sell the Crown Vic through retail channels, too, or is it just fleet only from now on? I seem to remember them threatening that last year, right?

    From a police standpoint, the CVPI is probably the best choice out there right now, but I can tell you when I competed in our local law enforcement driving challenge, I never lost – and I drove the Caprice 9C1, what I (and many others) consider the finest patrol car ever. In fact, I’d still pit a 1996 Caprice 9C1 against a 2008 CVPI…in performance, room, comfort, ingress/egress, you name it…

  • avatar
    Kyle Schellenberg

    This is great news! Now every time I see a Crown Vic coming down the road I’ll know it’s the cops and I can adjust my driving habits accordingly.

    In the old days, my heart used to skip a beat while behaving badly and noticing a white Crown Vic too late. My heart returned to its biologically-mandated rythym when I realized it was just Grandma and Grandpa off to a fast food establishment for unlimited refills of coffee.

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    The car provides needed cash flow and to the company….fixed costs are reduced, as much of the tooling is paid for. I bet most municipalities don’t haggle over the price or expect big discounts like John and Mary Public are asking for these days….so, it’s a profit niche for Ford, which will help them sustain….

    That is the bottom line reason why they are extending the life of this car.

    Similarly, the Ranger….all of a sudden, the market is crying for a vehicle which can haul, but gets reasonable mileage. The Ranger meets these criteria. Old tech? You bet. Last decades style? So what. Like the CVPI, the tools are paid for, the fixed costs are low, so the vehicle can generate cash with a relatively low sales volumes…..

    As you all know, we bean counters can’t run an auto company to save our lives, (I’m looking at you, Rick Wagoner!), but we CAN read the tea leaves of a decision like this….

  • avatar
    Mud

    We have a range of vehicles at our place – GM, Audi, Ford, and Honda so hopefully we are enlightened that there is life after Panther out there.

    My 95 CVPI runs like new at 150K miles, but my 02 HPP CV is still a babe at 90K miles. You can sneer at them all you want, but they have been the most dependable cars I’ve ever owned, and I don’t mind driving them at all. I find that the majority of folks with actual experience with them actually like them, as evidenced in the posts above. No car is perfect, just look through TTAC.

    I don’t remember seeing any more golden oldies driving them around than other brands. I’d have to go with Avalon on that one I think.

  • avatar

    Busbodger : I have a friend who is a local police chief and they are replacing their “young” Intrepids with used Crown Vics b/c the Intrepids are having so many troubles.

    Like front brakes catching on fire. Fun stuff.

    The Panther works for a lot of people, even Ford knows. They had the balls to stop selling CVPIs to municipalities who were suing them for the rear impact fires…and a LOT of them backed out of the lawsuit to avoid purchasing Impalas and Intrepids.

    And remember: there is no other vehicle tested and verified to save lives in a 75mph rear impact. I’d like to see a Camry pass that one.

    I’m still gonna be sad come 2012. Whatever that new Ford global RWD may be, there is still room for both platforms. Just my $0.02.

  • avatar
    whatsanobeen

    The CVPI is a legendary car in the most unusual fashion. It’s not respected as a BMW M, or a Ferrari would be, but as a loyal companion. Its the modern equivalent of the relationship between a cowboy and his horse.

  • avatar
    Alcibiades

    I’ve owned four recently, and now have two, an ’08 GMQ and an ’04 Town Car. They are great cars. Not perfect, by any means, but there is something about them you don’t get anywhere else, especially for the money. There is something about a simply designed, BOF, RWD V8. . .

  • avatar
    86er

    Alcibiades:
    There is something about a simply designed, BOF, RWD V8. . .

    Shhh! Didn’t you get the memo? We’re supposed to like exactly what the rest of the world likes. Anything else would be tantamount to mass ignorance and arrogance.

    whatsanobeen:
    The CVPI is a legendary car in the most unusual fashion. It’s not respected as a BMW M, or a Ferrari would be, but as a loyal companion. Its the modern equivalent of the relationship between a cowboy and his horse.

    Exactly, even though this horse drinks from the wrong end.


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