By on July 2, 2008

2008-mustang-bullit-in-air.JPGI've driven a lot of new Mustangs. Specifically, the V6 Convertible, GT, GT Convertible, GT California Special, Hertz GT-H, Shelby GT and the Shelby GT500 (coupe and convertible). The only ones I've missed are the V6 hard top (I'll pass) and the Shelby GT500KR. After last week, I can check the 2008 Bullitt Mustang off my pony car to-do list. Limited to "just" 7700 examples, the Bullitt follows the path laid down by its cinematic inspiration: green paint, black wheels, limited badging and more power. As a veteran ‘Stang wrangler, let me tell you how the latest iteration stacks up against the other stallions…

The fundamental theorem of all modern Mustangs: Somewhere, on some road, at some point in time, you will understand why V8 gumption mated to a rear wheel-drive chassis is a winning formula. In other words, they're supposed to be throwbacks.

08mustangbullitt_18_hr.jpgIn a run-of-the-mill Mustang GT, you may only get that rebel without a cause feeling on a big straight highway when you downshift and drop hammer for the Hell of it. In the GT Convertible, the car’s only evocative when you're driving next to an ocean. In the psychotic highly-tuned GT500, ‘Stangstacy only arrives when you crack 4,000 rpm and the supercharger whines louder than a newborn with dysentery. In the rare GT-H Rent-a-Racer (solely slushbox), you only achieve that special sensation when others are gawking and pointing. Alone in the desert? Snore.

But the Bullitt Mustang gets it right everywhere, all the time. You feel lucky and invincible while putting around town, devouring a freeway, whipping through corners or just standing still.

08mustangbullitt_15_hr.jpgCase in point: I let a pal-o-mine drive the Bullitt (he begged) back from a night out in Hollywood. We were on Sunset, barely cracking 40 mph and he couldn't shut up. "Dude, this feels awesome!" Then we turned north into the hills and he gunned it. "Oh man, oh man, oh man! I love this car!" My friend was Frank Bullitt for perhaps fifteen minutes. I, on the hand, had the pleasure of running up more than 700 miles of burbling V8 seat time. And I never felt any different.

There are only two downsides. One is fuel economy. Driving to and from San Diego, I never went below 80 mph (or above 110 mph). The Bullitt returned an honest 25 mpg. When my week was over, I had averaged 17.6 mpg. Not counting the free tank my tester came with, I spent $171.10 on 87 octane gas. And I returned it on fumes. The other negative is (of course) the Bullitt’s interior.

08must_bull_iph_hr.jpgFord knows better than us that their car interiors suck. But there is mounting evidence, however tenuous, that FoMoCo is moving beyond acceptance to transformation. A few minutes spent in the new Ford Flex CUV are all Mustang fans need to light the candle of hope. The new 2010 Mustang will be a nice place to sit. The 2008 Mustangs, however, just aren’t.

Returning to my friend's off the cuff comments: "Why would they do this?" He was rapping his fingers against the hard, horrible dash cover. "Why not raise the price a little and make the inside as cool as the outside?" Birds chirping.

Let me give you another example of the bad and ugly. There's a button next to the cupholder that has a picture of a shoe on a pedal with a light shining on top of it. For four days I kept pressing it and looking at my feet, waiting for some sign of illumination. Nada. Then one day my girlfriend pressed it and noticed that the ring of light around the cupholder changed colors. Parts binnage at it's very, very worst.

08mustangbullitt_13_hr.jpgLuckily, the Bullitt’s exterior is so spot-on that only us auto scribes would bother bitching about the interior. The Bullitt is nearly debadged. Only the wheel centers have the Mustang pony logo and with the exception of the lone "Ford Bullitt" badge on the trunk, there's no other indication. I especially dig the front, which is less fussy than the V6. Talk about stealth. If you're a fan of the Mustang's shape, then the Bullitt is the ideal form.

In fact, the Bullitt is what the GT should have been from day one. The sounds it makes are intoxicating. Them modest 15 hp and five lb-ft power bumps (315 hp, 325 torques) feel massively underrated. Thank the 3.73:1 final drive ratio and heightened redline.

08mustangbullitt_24_hr.jpgBut honestly, you can throw your numbers out the window. Who cares if an STI can stop shorter or that a 335i has sharper steering? Not I, and certainly not a Bullitt owner. Ford has crafted a very special Mustang that feels fantastic, mile after thundering mile.

[Ford provided the vehicle reviewed, insurance and a tank of gas.] 

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50 Comments on “2008 Mustang Bullitt Review: Take Two...”


  • avatar
    carguy622

    My brother just totaled his 2007 Mustang GT California Special (thankfully he came out of the car fine) and was looking at one of these on the dealers lot. With Ford’s X-Plan that my mother gets through her employer it would have been about $33,000. He decided to take a pass on the Bullitt though and stick with the GT. His California Special depreciated quite a bit and he did not want to finance that much. Interestingly enough he felt that compared to the GT the interior of the Bullitt was like a luxury car.

    I told him to look at other cars; a Mazdaspeed 3, VW GTI, Civic Si, or Subaru WRX, but he refused, Mustangs only for him.

  • avatar
    Robstar

    So it seems this car is for people who want a throwback to the old days….Other than that, not much to say about it..? For $33k he could have had an STi, no ?

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    17.5 mpg.

    just shoot me.

  • avatar
    Slare

    “Driving to and from San Diego, I never went below 80 mph (or above 110 mph). The Bullitt returned an honest 25 mpg. When my week was over, I had averaged 17.6 mpg.”

    So in some conditions it was only getting 10mpg or maybe less? Yeouch. I understand the penalty of a big V8 & 3.73′s, but that’s worse than I expected.

  • avatar
    Robstar

    My 4 cylinder STi doesn’t get 24mpg combined….more like 21-22.

    25 isn’t bad.

    On the otherhand I use my sportbike (44-48) or the neon (34-38) for road trips these days.

  • avatar
    radimus

    jersey, you don’t drive one of these for the gas mileage.

  • avatar
    doctorv8

    One way to improve the interior aesthetics a bit: order the optional Premier interior group. This adds the stitched leather covered dashtop from the GT500, and it goes a long way toward making things feel more acceptable inside.

  • avatar

    Nice review, Jonny.

    I think the optional stitched material on the IP is leatherette, not leather. Either way, it does improve the ambiance of the interior.

    The bad news: it’s not available with the Bullitt. It’s supposed to be as bare bones as the original, right?

    One plus for the current Mustang: they seem to hardly ever require repairs, based on owners’ responses to TrueDelta’s Vehicle Reliability Survey. The 2005s are a bit better than average, the 2006 and 2007 much better.

    http://www.truedelta.com/latest_results.php

  • avatar
    Matthew Danda

    So that wasn’t you getting all 4 wheels in the air in that picture? Using a loaner car?

  • avatar
    SupaMan

    I think that picture was from a Motor Trend issue…trying to recreate a scene from Bullitt.

    Nice review though. I think the current crop of Mustangs are nice for what they are, but for me, having a live axle out back for anything that isn’t a truck is a huge turn off, no matter how much more abuse it can take in drag launches.

  • avatar
    Lumbergh21

    Getting rid of that horrible mettalic dash would go a long way towards making the interior better IMO.

  • avatar
    nuclearay

    A re-review of a car with a dozen-or-so TTAC reviews already. (a re-re-re-re-re-re-re-re-re…-view!)

    YAWN.

    The only reason I started and finished the 800 words is Lieberman’s writing style.

  • avatar
    mmdpg

    I’ve had my Bullitt for 3 months. Average “highway only” mileage- 24, average around town with lots of high reving starts-18. I still wake up in the middle of the night and think “Do I get to drive my Bullitt today or is it supposed to rain?” Live rear axel or not you can take a 25 MPH posted off ramp at 60 and not feel body lean or like you are taking your life in your hands. It’s almost too much fun to drive.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    mmdpg:

    Obviously, I’m with you.

    The Bullitt is the first car in a long time where I’ve looked at my WRX and gone, “Hmmmm….”

  • avatar
    picard234

    I’m with nuclearay. YAWN! Seems like there’s another new edition of the Mustang every other month or so.

  • avatar
    Qusus

    Ultimately, isn’t the Bullit a Mustang GT with a CAI, a tune, exhaust, and a few suspension parts from FRPP? It seems like GT’s with just a CAI and tune make just as much power no? Is the character really that different from a run of the mill GT?

    And did a WRX owner just admit that he gave eyes to a Mustang? That’s just blasphemous. Jonny, give me your address. I will be notifying the authorities and they will be on their way to promptly confiscate your car.

    What a freakin’ looker though. Yikes.

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Qusus: Definitely a case of the sum being much more than the parts.

    The tuning is the key. Specifically the noise. It’s bloody fantastic.

    And yeah… I know… Subaru’s after me.

    How do I explain this…?

    Logically, I know that the Bullitt is not much faster than the WRX.

    However, emotionally, the WRX can’t hold a candle to the Bullitt. The Ford is raw and brutal — like a big cat. Whereas the WRX is more like a busy squirrel. Quick as hell, but… Not a Bullitt.

  • avatar
    rpenna

    As a daily driver, no. But, as a summer car, I love my 07 GT convertible. Add a CAI, Hurst shifter, and a new tune and the thing is just a blast to drive.

    The interior sucks, but bang for your buck is great, and it holds carseats. :)

  • avatar
    rpenna

    Jonny, I think you hit it right on the head. When you sit in one of these things and fire it up, it feels “raw”, nostalgic, “cool”. The rush you get allows you to forget about the ugly silver plating on the dash.

  • avatar
    EnusBurdett

    I finally caught sight of one of these on the highway last week and it is an impressive looking car. I’ve been lukewarm to the new ‘stangs, but this version is a really sharp looking vehicle. It makes me wish all the more that Ford had gone with a proper fastback from the ’67-8 as they did with the initial show car. That and perhaps slightly slimmer overall dimensions. And the dash. I have yet to see the interior in person but I think some dark shelf paper grade wood grain would be more in synch.

    I second the exhaustion with the Mustang version of the week – but in the case of the GT500 and the Bullitt I gladly make exception. The GT500 is a just good read for the “that car just tried to kill me” vibe of many articles and the Bullitt because it’s the only new Mustang that as a package looks to be so well done that I’ve actually considered it. This thing just looks fun.

    Keep going with the Take Two – I appreciate the extra perspective.

  • avatar
    Qusus

    HAHA gotchya: big cat vs a busy squirrel. Perfect, I get that exactly though I’ve never driven an actual WRX. You know how Mustang’s have that running horse emblem? Subaru should put one of a squirrel gathering an acorn on the WRX. Man… I was just kidding before but those guys are actually gonna be after you now.

  • avatar
    ande5000

    The Bullitt and WRX STi (not the std WRX, which has gotten too soft and mainstream) are, I think, spiritual cousins, but only distant cousins. The Mustang is a whole diffent driving experience than anything Japanese. Besides, the Bullitt is several $K cheaper than an STi, and gas mileage actually looks better overall.

    I agree with the “sum is much more than the parts” comment. Too many people just look at raw numbers or individual parts and forget (or don’t realize) that a car’s driving dynamics and real-world feel are in the combination and how it’s engineered to work together. Apparently Ford nailed this one, and I agree this setup should be standard for the regular Mustang GT.

    I get tired of reading bitches about the interiors on these cars. So friggin’ what if they’re a little low rent? That’s part of the “badd-ass” charm of these cars. The Bullitt is meant to be driven like you hate it, every day, rain or shine and come back for more. And all for reasonable money. In terms of sheer bang for the buck among the current crop of similar rides, you can’t can’t beat it in my book.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    Qusus: “Ultimately, isn’t the Bullit a Mustang GT with a CAI, a tune, exhaust, and a few suspension parts from FRPP? It seems like GT’s with just a CAI and tune make just as much power no? Is the character really that different from a run of the mill GT?”In order to get a GT Premium Mustang close to what a Bullitt has in the included price (upgrades like larger wheels/tires, interior, and lower rear axle ratio), the price differential is much closer, within something like $750. Unfortunately, the nice stitched dash is unavailable on the Bullitt (it should have been included).

    Nonetheless, the factory-installed CAI, tune, exhaust, and suspension parts are easily worth an additional $750 over the price of an equivalent GT Premium.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    Getting rid of that horrible mettalic dash would go a long way towards making the interior better IMO.

    The metallic dash isn’t metallic, unfortunately. It’d be cool if it was, though.

    I saw this car at the NY auto show this spring. On the outside, it looks much more cooler than in the pictures.

    I’d sacrifice a few steak dinners to foot the gasoline costs of this thing. The subaru’s fast, but to compare the two is just not proper. The cacophonic blat of a flat four does not hold a candle to the rumble of a V8.

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    radimus said:
    you don’t drive one of these for the gas mileage.

    True, but i would like to be able to drive it around without breaking the bank.

    So as much as i want one, I will not be buying one. It would break my heart. As well as my budget. Unless I get a good deal on a convertable version and the sun is shining and i wanna go to the shore and…..

  • avatar
    Cuidichn

    quasimondo said :
    July 2nd, 2008 at 1:44 pm

    “The metallic dash isn’t metallic, unfortunately. It’d be cool if it was, though.”

    Actually it is. It is aluminum, not metalized plastic.

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    They must’ve changed it up from the one I saw at the Auto show then. I was disappointed the one they had on the floor wasn’t aluminum, made the interior feel excessively cheap.

  • avatar
    Areitu

    17 city and 25 freeway from a 300hp V8 pony car is not bad at all, and there’s the benefit of using 87 octane. My 350Z isn’t too far off those figures, uses 91, and I drive like a granny when I can. The Bullitt is more powerful and has the V8 bellow, too.

    Hmmm…

  • avatar
    Jonny Lieberman

    Areitu: Try 25 highway, 10 or so City.

  • avatar
    sheckel2

    I bought a Bullitt a few weeks ago and I haven’t had this much fun driving a vehicle in my entire life.

    And guess what, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, I love the dash! And so do most people I’ve shown it do.

  • avatar
    carveman

    Ford can put the horsey logo on their bankruptcy papers. 40 years later and this is the best they come up with? Steve Mcqueen is spinning in his grave.

  • avatar
    supremebrougham

    My cousin bought one of these a few months ago. His dad has a ’67 GT Fastback in the same color that he’s had since 1970, so for him it was kind of a tradition thing. Back in May I was in town visiting the family and he had it there. He asked me to go for a ride with him, and even though I know that riding with him will cause my life to flash before my eyes, I went anyway, because I wanted to ride in his new car. We went over near the old GM Willow Run plant and on a narrow two lane stretch of road we took off. After a few seconds of blindingly fast speed I asked how fast we were going. He looked down and said “We’re up to 120!”, and the car was still accelerating! I’m sooo glad that Ford didn’t skimp on brakes or suspension design, because I wanted to live!!! (If you saw that road you would have feared for your life too.)

    That V8 sure felt smooth though…

    Oh, I almost forgot, on the way back he checked the computer and it said he was averaging around 14 MPG, and he leadfoots it every time.

  • avatar
    Cuidichn

    “# quasimondo :
    July 2nd, 2008 at 3:13 pm

    They must’ve changed it up from the one I saw at the Auto show then. I was disappointed the one they had on the floor wasn’t aluminum, made the interior feel excessively cheap.”

    I have no idea what you looked at at the auto show, but it must not have been a Bullitt.
    Ford hasn’t changed anything.

  • avatar
    Cuidichn

    “# carveman :
    July 2nd, 2008 at 9:25 pm

    Ford can put the horsey logo on their bankruptcy papers. 40 years later and this is the best they come up with? Steve Mcqueen is spinning in his grave.”

    Are you familiar at all with this particular car carveman?

    If Steve McQueen is spinning in his grave it can only be to get out and drive this new version of the car he first created.

  • avatar
    thetopdog

    The only really bad things about the Mustang’s interior are the extremely hard armrest (at least in the base V6 version that I’ve had as a rental a few times, maybe they upgraded the material on some of the special editions), the high windowsill that makes it impossible to rest your left arm on comfortably, and the fact that you have to almost be a contortionist to reach your seatbelt. The rest is fine with me

    And I agree about there being something special about a ‘Stang. About a year and a half ago I was the proud owner of a Lexus GS400. The car had 300hp, braked and handled pretty well for a sedan, and was fairly luxurious inside. An idiot rammed into my back door, so I was able to get a rental car on her dime and opted for a yellow ‘Stang. Even though it was the base V6 version, I enjoyed driving it more than I enjoyed the GS. It was strange, my GS did pretty much everything better than a base ‘Stang, but the ‘Stang just felt “cooler” for lack of a better word. I also think the handling was a little better despite the live axle. I was already thinking of getting rid of the GS, but that experience just confirmed things for me. I didn’t end up with a ‘Stang, but I ended up with a Vette and couldn’t be happier

  • avatar
    quasimondo

    I have no idea what you looked at at the auto show, but it must not have been a Bullitt.
    Ford hasn’t changed anything.

    Oh, I’m sure it was, I have pictures to prove it:

    http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b350/quasimondo/NY%20Auto%20Show%202k8/e3ea02be.jpg
    http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b350/quasimondo/NY%20Auto%20Show%202k8/b11631c0.jpg
    http://i22.photobucket.com/albums/b350/quasimondo/NY%20Auto%20Show%202k8/70ffe962.jpg

  • avatar
    Cuidichn

    yes that’s the dash. I’m surprised you didn’t recognise it as a quality aluminum piece.
    It is actually a true machine finish, not photo reproduced. Such a dash finish has history with Ford, being used for the 1932 Ford and other models.

    Now the other Mustang dash treatments, ‘satin finish aluminum’, and the textured charcoal, are certainly ‘excessively cheap’ in comparison.

  • avatar
    socsndaisy

    Thanks for the great read Johnny.

    Ive owned six different mustangs in my lifetime and Im dead-solid-sure I haven’t had my fill yet. This one really lights a spark but, as great as it is, I just couldn’t imagine going the hardtop route again. The convertible was, quite easily, the coolest car I’ve ever had…certainly not the best, but clearly the coolest.

    Lately, the one that has my attention is Saleen’s H302 3V but I have yet to see one in convertible form.

  • avatar
    nippywiffle

    It’s a shame ford didn’t think to add the wrapped and stitched options to the interior of the bullitt…
    I have a 2008 GT, with the premier trim package, with red/black leather, and I love it. I’m extremely picky about pretty much everything on my cars, and I’m from the UK originally, so I’ve already experienced european interiors, but my GT with the premier trim is better than anything I’ve been in before. The combination of the retro upper-part of the dash, with the leather and stitching, the soft padding added to the arm rest on both the center console and the door arm rest just makes this relatively cheap upgrade totally worth it – not to mention how much more ‘alive’ everything feels with the 2-tone interior colors. Mine is red/black, but they also offer it in chamois/black, dove/black and parchment/black.

    It’d do ford good to just raise their mustang prices by $350 or so, and have this s a standard feature. Then people might not bitch about it all the time, because they wouldn’t always be receiving base models with hard interiors to do their tests.

    The only hard plastic I see in mine, is the underside of the dash… and I’m not sure about you, but I don’t spend my time sitting there rubbing my hands all over the underside of the dash…
    The other hard plastic is around the radio, and the center cup holders etc, but this is of a higher quality, and no worse than any european car I used to drive.

    It’s a shame ford gets points knocked off their reviews when there’s only a $350 upgrade package between a poor and an excellent interior.

  • avatar
    nippywiffle

    Forgot – the other hard plastic is on part of the door trim… but again, the other upgrades draw your attention away from it, so it’s not even noticible (which is obviously why I forgot it existed, until I thought hard about it).

  • avatar
    nippywiffle

    Oh, and to correct another slight non-truth, the GT (same engine, 15hp less) that I own consistently gets above 20mpg in 90% city driving, if there’s a week or 2 where I have a lot more highway driving than normal, that rises to around 24mpg average. These have been confirmed by comparing the computer displayed mpg, against calculating based on distance/gallons put in when fueling.

    If I reset the mpg computer while using cruise control at 65mph, it can get as high as 32, but generally around 29-30.

    When driving 50-55 with cruise, it has gone as high as 34mpg, and settled around 32mpg.

    Of course, no-one will believe me, but it is entirely due to how you drive it. Yes, when I first got my GT, I drove it hard and ended up with around 18mpg average, but once you get over that stage, and only do that occasionally.. you can end up with good fuel economy, considering the engine size.

  • avatar
    Cuidichn

    nippywiffle

    I agree about the Premier trim. It should have at least been an option on the Bullitt. The Bullitt already has basically the Interior upgrade package with adjustments to suit the Bullitt packaging.

    I like the red seats especially in a black car. I wish they also offered a red seat insert. (obviously not related to the Bullitt)

  • avatar
    Cuidichn

    I also agree nippywiffle that the Mustang GT, including the Bullitt, gets better fuel economy than the reported estimated values.
    The new method of calculating the estimates supposedly reflects closer to real values than the old method, but obviously it is still flawed.

  • avatar
    nippywiffle

    Cuidichn – maybe we should start another website “the REAL truth about cars” :-D

    We could go around driving in real world conditions, and post the real mpg that cars get, regardless of their ratings, and submit comments to manufacturers about how to boost their review ratings (since most people base their opinion of a car, on the first review they read…)

    :-D

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I’d like to drive one of these.

    I’ve had about 4 Mustang V6 rentals over the past 2 months (thanks Avis!) and didn’t really like them much. The convertible did make it much more enjoyable, but the V6 Auto version just wasn’t much fun.

    I test drove a V8 GT manual in 2006 and really enjoyed it. Just wasnt looking for a new car at that point.

    Every review sounds like this is my kinda mustang. I’ve seen 2 and love the exterior. I have a Miata now and like the rawness and how it too feels way more than its spec sheet says it should. I love cars like that, and I’m willing to bet I’d love the Bullitt too for the exact same reasons.

    But 2 things prevent me from really ever seeing myself in a Mustang, and I’m ashamed to admit it (seeing I drive a Miata) but they’re safety items. No stability control available, and no curtain airbags. I live in Chicago. I can do the Miata thing in the winter on all-seasons. It works. But I’ve spooked myself a couple times. My mother has a RWD BMW 3 with snow tires and stability control and the difference in control is a real plus. Nothing too different in normal driving, but having that net there when the back end starts to come around when you don’t want it to really adds piece of mind. That’s the biggest. I just can’t imagine a 300hp V8 monster without stability control in the snow. The curtains aren’t enough to stop me from buying the car but really should be at least an option. Stability is enough to stop me.

    MPG, eh. Its really no better or worse than a slew of other performance cars, including the Z, G35, RX8, WRX, etc.

    Maybe I’ll get out and see if I can get a spin in one. I’m willing to bet even with sales in the crapper, the local Ford store is going to be treating these like they’re the GD GT or a Shelby.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    Cuidichn Says: “I agree about the Premier trim. It should have at least been an option on the Bullitt.”Yeah, the padded, stitched dash and console that comes with the Premier trim would have went a long way to muting at least some of the criticism of the interior, not to mention enhancing the ‘retro’ aspect (dash stitching was standard on all 1967-68 Mustangs).

  • avatar
    seano32b

    Great! The Bullitt is the BOMB! As soon as I punched it, I had to have it. It is one of a kind, or more precisely, one of a kind, out of 7700.

  • avatar
    jstnspin82

    Again like the Challenger the up coming Camaro and the new Mustang I like the sort of throwback feel and for a while it’s probably a major factor holding the big 3 from collapsing but with gas prices now it seems irrelevant that Muscle cars are coming back. The muscle car era ended in 1970 due to the gas and fuel consumption so is it any better now? I might purchase a new Bullitt Mustang but for about the same price you could buy a 68 Ford Mustang and spend a little more restoring it to look like original from the movie. I have one question also, in this day in age have any of these young kids even seen Bullitt or know who Steve McQueen is? Most likely not so I see this car as maybe a collectors item for the older generation and if you just buy the car not knowing the history you are just an idiot!

  • avatar

    jstnspin82,
    No, you’re correct, most younger drivers don’t know about the film, Bullitt, and I couldn’t care less. I know and appreciate the history of the film and the history behind the car. By, the way, I am a member of the, “older generation,” and I don’t give a rip about gas prices. I born and raised in Detroit, grew up around muscle cars, and decided to buy one that has a sizable collectors value and a meaning to me. Thanks for your concern over my mental state of mind be behind my recent purchase, but you can save it for someone who cares.

  • avatar
    Hayward

    2008 Mustang Bullitt:
    1. Quality and legacy will eventually matter to younger auto enthusiasts
    2. You can get much better fuel mileage 30 average depending on how you drive and simple mods (easily reversible) that will not hurt the value of this potentially valuable model.
    3. This car is “retro”, do you want a modern European interior in this car, or more authentic?
    4. this car will handle and accelerate comparably with any other car BMW/Subaru/etc in or above its class except a “supercar”, easy to modify/reverse
    5. this car may be very collectible


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