By on September 5, 2007

14.jpgAs I drove to my neighborhood Kia dealer, the window signage caught my eye. Actually, make that grabbed both eyeballs and ripped them out, Oedipus-style. DRIVE TODAY! NO CREDIT! BAD CREDIT! I wondered how long before the words “What price are you looking to pay?” would effect the same injury to my ears. While dealerships like this make Kia’s 100,000 mile warranty look like a mixed blessing, let’s face it: they know their market. As does the Kia Optima LX.

If you ever want to knock off a bank and leave witnesses unable to identify your getaway car, drive an Optima. Alternatively, you could say the sedan’s design is appealingly subtle. The front may have a touch too much Ford Taurus to it, but the Kia’s common sense proportions and unadorned sheetmetal evokes the style-less styling of 70’s-era Bimmers. From its sparing use of chrome to its plain Jane wheels, the Optima is deeply, wildly inoffensive.

1722.jpgA recent review made a big deal of the Optima’s interior “soft-touch home run.” You have to weigh that praise in the context of modern mass-market carmaking; the American public expects more horsepower, speakers and airbags which each successive iteration of an existing model– for the same price. Something has to give. Generally, that something is interior materials. Bottom line: the Optima has gradually improved while others (read: Camry) have cratered. So now there’s a smaller gap (pun intended).

That said, your eyes will have no problem telling the difference between the LX and higher-priced merchandise. Yes, the pieces are low-gloss and fit well, but there are so many bits and pigments you’ll think the designers were paid by the color. Score one for the leather-lined, neon-gauged Appearance Package, which comes in any color as long as it’s black. This cockpit not only looks swanky with its perforated leather and brushed accents, it conceals all that busyness.

To its credit, Kia has positioned the Optima’s soft-touch bits from your elbows up, where you confront them the most. Everything below is as hard and cheap as a forty-five- year-old sex industry worker. The Kia’s steering wheel tilts and telescopes, but the mechanism’s crudity will deter you from recreational telescoping. And while overall leg and headroom room is class-compliant and more than sufficient for the average human form, front-seat thigh support is, er, sub-optimal.

18.jpgThe Optima’s 2.4-liter four cylinder engine is the fruit of a joint venture between Mitsubishi, Chrysler and Hyundai.  The quality of the weed involved couldn’t have been that high. Although the 162hp mill's fairly punchy off the line and tolerably responsive at highway speeds, it’s dog-dead in rolling acceleration around 40mph. The Optima ambles from rest to 60mph in around 10 seconds. I didn’t try the Sportmatic® slap-shifter, but I doubt it would help; the electronic five-speed lacked proper ratios.

The step-up to the 185hp 2.7-liter V6 is a questionable improvement on paper. A $2k premium buys you a one second improvement to 60 with a debilitating effect on gas mileage. But it’s a no-brainer for those who have more than the environment or their wallet in mind, offering superior midrange punch and much more refined noises. One word of warning, though: like all modern Hyundai/Kia V6’s, its solid lifters must be adjusted near the 90k mile mark. The work isn’t covered under that famous warranty and carries a four-figure sting.

11.jpgOnce underway, the Optima’s pillowy standard suspension is a weaker sedative than a fistful of barbiturates washed down with Southern Comfort, but stronger than two Ambien. If you don’t like to drive and you buy a four-pot Camry instead of an Optima, you either live near a Toyota dealer or you simply don’t care about money. The Kia’s ride quality is at least as good– or as bad– as the Toyota’s.

If you’re not insensitive to the joys of driving, the Optima’s Appearance Package (AP) is a must. While the spec sheet doesn’t say the AP’s suspension is firmer, the fatter Michelin shoes sure make it feel like it is. Perched high atop the Optima’s springs (the price of a civilized ride), you’re still subject to enough body movement to stay your right foot. But roll angles and cornering become perfectly respectable for a family sedan; something to be endured rather than avoided.

16.jpgAdd in stability control, leather, a killer stereo– the full zoot– and we’re talking around $20k. Measured against the ’07 Accord EX V6, the Optima LX comes up short in acceleration, mileage and toys. But measured against comparably priced family iron, it’s just as comfortable (unless you’re long-legged) and vastly more satisfying to look at and sit in. The top Optima will never win any (real) awards, but if there was a Subtly Nice Sedan For Not Much Money, Now or Down the Road trophy, the Optima would be a shoo-in.

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44 Comments on “Kia Optima LX Review...”


  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    One word of warning, though: like all modern Hyundai/Kia V6’s, its solid lifters must be adjusted near the 90k mile mark. The work isn’t covered under that famous warranty and carries a four-figure sting.

    Yikes! Sounds even worse than the 60,000 mile reacharound you had with older Japanese cars for a timing belt change.

    Where else but TTAC would you hear about unexpected service costs in a new car review?

    Very well done.

  • avatar
    salhany

    I drove one of these in April as a rental out in Colorado. Peppy enough around town but on the highway the 4 banger was simply overmatched in the mountains.

    The seats were particularly unsupportive; I remember that very clearly driving through ski area access road twisties. Comfortable ride. The blandness of the design is much lessened in the right color; my buddy just leased one of these and it’s a rich metallic blue that looks great.

  • avatar
    synthetic

    I like it. 4 years down the road a used Optima will be a steal compared to a used Camry or Accord. That’s what you want to buy for your teenage daughter as a “first car”.

    Nice review.

  • avatar
    Chaser

    Yeah, I’m still stuck on that one. So all of their V6′s have to have this $1,000+ work done at 90k miles regardless? Is this something that your regular Joe Mechanic can do, or do you need to visit the dealership? What happens if you don’t have it serviced?

  • avatar
    BEAT

    One thing Kia hasn’t learned that having a Blue Luminous or back ground light on the dash will make you sleepy and a little irritable that may cause Road Rage. Having a Orange or white back ground light is a little better. How do I know?

    My Dad’s car has a Blue light on one of his car and he said it makes him sleepy and irritable.

    But Kia is a nice car for it’s price. I like the the Dash though quite good for a New Car manufacturer. from the Land of the Can Do Spirit.

    By the way Toyota’s sale is down 3% percent and GMC is up to 4%. I wonder where is Honda’s sales quota for the 3rd quarter of this year.

  • avatar

    Awesome review. What’s the bottom line? Once-great class leaders (Honda and Toyota) eroding away, making mediocrity palatable, or is there enough above-mediocrity in the Optima to make it worth a look?

  • avatar
    Kevin

    Hey now, people with bad credit need cars too! Especially them, they need to drive to work…

  • avatar
    pdub

    If you don’t like to drive and you buy a four-pot Camry instead of an Optima, you either live near a Toyota dealer or you simply don’t care about money. The Kia’s ride quality is at least as good– or as bad– as the Toyota’s.

    Well-said and right-on. I’m so sick of Toyotas and their blind loyalists. And yet, no matter how much I’d like to cheer on any competitor, these new Optimas and Sonatas still have no resale value. We struggled for 6 months to give away a 6 cylinder Sonata for $12,995 with 30xxx miles at my dealership(half its full btob warranty left). People wanted to pay $12k or less.

    An equivalent Camry or Fusion could get $3k more for a 4 cylinder.

    People also care about resale value.

  • avatar
    confused1096

    I’ve had these twice as rentals. The V6 makes highway cruising a bit easier. The 4 banger seemed to struggle a bit. I don’t know if that’s normal for the car, as the 4 banger had 56k of rented miles on it. Not a bad car, but a bit cramped.

  • avatar
    stevevt

    Nice review. 

  • avatar
    kansei

    If this 90k service business is in fact needed with the Delta 2.7, why is it not covered under the 100k mile powertrain warranty. Last I checked, valvetrain is a bit important for the overall powertrain.

    My Protege5 has solid lifters and I’ve never heard of someone needing to get anything re-shimmed. At least with a 4-cyl the labor will be about half as much.

  • avatar

    It’s funny you mention robbery; Kia is running an ad in Canada where 4 thieves us a Kia Rio as a get-away car. Art imitates life?

  • avatar
    davey49

    I think you summed up the Optima perfectly.
    It’s the new 1997 Camry. This and the Sonata will be the cars that everyone will be buying 10 years from now. After the Japanese brands have priced and “interior materials” themselves out of our wallets and become Audi.

  • avatar
    Paul Milenkovic

    Somewhere north of $1000 to adjust valve lifters? Say again?

    Back in the day, my 78 Ford Fiesta (I still have it in my Dad’s barn — I can’t move it because I guess the hydraulic fluid leaked out of the clutch piston and I can’t get it in gear — anyway, as a bored motorhead, I took it upon myself to adjust valve lifters, thinking that tweaking them would help performance or gas mileage or something.

    You unscrew the valve cover, and then you slide these feeler gauges under the tappets and adjust some screws. Maybe there was something about a remote starter button to turn the engine over to get the valves in position. I still have my Pep Boys feeler gauges in my tool box.

    What costs $1000+ about valve lash adjustment? To you have to lift the whole motor out to get at them?

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    “kansei :
    September 5th, 2007 at 7:24 pm

    If this 90k service business is in fact needed with the Delta 2.7, why is it not covered under the 100k mile powertrain warranty. Last I checked, valvetrain is a bit important for the overall powertrain.”

    The powertrain warranty covers malfunctions – not maintenance. At least that’s what I suspect Hyndai/Kia will tell you. You pay for oil changes and tune ups, right? Well, you pay for valve adjustments as well.

    God, I’m glad my wife doesn’t put high mileage on her 2002 Hyundai Santa Fe with the 2.7-liter V6.

    “Paul Milenkovic :
    September 5th, 2007 at 10:25 pm

    Somewhere north of $1000 to adjust valve lifters? Say again?

    What costs $1000+ about valve lash adjustment? To you have to lift the whole motor out to get at them?”

    Perhaps some professional mechanics can keep me honest here, but I think it has everything to do with what the offical hourly shop labor guide says the job should cost – not how difficult a task it is or how long it actually takes to complete.

    This will vary by dealer and location, of course. But in the NYC metro area, shop rates can run $90 an hour. It might only take a 2 or 3 hours to do, but the shop guide may say 10 hourly units is what the job should cost.

    Anyone who can shed more light on this, feel free to correct me.

  • avatar

    pdub “I’m so sick of Toyotas and their blind loyalists. And yet, no matter how much I’d like to cheer on any competitor….”

    I have never understood why anyone cares what other people like or don’t like. Of course then you gave away why you care what others like or don’t like with

    “We struggled for 6 months to give away a 6 cylinder Sonata for $12,995 with 30xxx miles at my dealership”

    Let me guess a domestic dealership? Oh well you might hate people liking Toyota but most of your potential customers aren’t going to like or dislike Toyota simply because it is convenient for your dealership. Rightly or wrongly past experience will influence most people but
    Hyundai and Kia with time if they keep their quality up should give Toyota fits with a lower priced alternative.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    A lot of engines have solid lifters. They don’t require much attention. Is this Hyundai engine that much different from all the Mazdas, Hondas, Toyotas, etc. that had/have them?

  • avatar
    TaxedAndConfused

    @Paul Milenkovic:

    At least you could adjust the tappets (lifters) on those. The later ones you couldn’t so they just got noisier.

    Someone on Autoshite described an old Festa as sounding like a skeleton wanking in a biscuit tin.

  • avatar
    shaker

    That V6 engine has got to go; the extra zero-point-three liters comes with little benefit in power and torque, more frictional losses (less efficient), and a potential maintenence cost that shouldn’t be needed in a modern engine. That’s Kia/Hyundai’s mission: dump that dog!

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Kia dealers (at least in the Midwest) seem to have THE most noxious television commercials.
    That alone would keep me far away.

    However I’m guessing Kia/Hyundai have made good progress on reliability and when these cars are 5 yrs old and selling for pocket change, they will be an excellent “beater buy”.

  • avatar
    seldomawake

    I’m a little concerned about the lifter adjustment on the V6. Am I understanding this correctly: the springs on the lifters just die around 90k, and need to be replaced, lest the lifters stop working and gas stop getting to the engine, AND this isn’t covered in the warranty? Ouch…

  • avatar
    shaker

    Likely the valve tappets have shims to maintain clearence to the camshaft; they likely wear and have to be replaced when excessive clearence results in valvetrain noise and loss of performance.

  • avatar
    bfg9k

    More on the solid lifter issue, from a commentary on the new Kia Sedona minivan with Hyundai’s 3.8L V6:

    The older Sedona V6 had hydraulic lifters and a timing belt; now it is solid lifters, shims and three chains. To replace the shims if the valve clearance is off, you must remove the cams. To remove the cams you must remove the chains. Yikes! I don’t like this.

    Source:
    http://www.asashop.org/autoinc/june2006/techtotech.htm

    Sounds pricey! My wife and I will probably upgrade our ’03 Odyssey once my Saab wagon is paid off. I’m thinking the Hyundai Entourage may be off the list…

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    To replace the shims if the valve clearance is off, you must remove the cams. To remove the cams you must remove the chains. Yikes! I don’t like this.

    That explains the insane price. So much for Korean cars being a great value.

    My question is, do the latest and greatest 3.5L V6s from Nissan (VQ), Honda, Toyota, Ford (Duratec) and the 3.6L GM have similar periodic valvetrain adjustments?

  • avatar
    thetopdog

    Why is everybody so surprised that a lifter adjustment isn’t covered under warranty? Maintenance items are never covered under warranty (with the exception of BMW’s ‘free’ maintenance over the first xxxx years/miles)

    A huge service bill around 90k miles isn’t unusual. The last gen Lexus GS400/430 (and I’m assuming the new one as well, since it has the carryover 4.3L V8) required a $1000+ replacement of the timing belt at 90k. Although I drove mine until 115k and the engine hadn’t exploded before I sold it.

  • avatar
    socsndaisy

    Every time I see an Optima on the road, which isnt too often, I think to myself “thats a pretty nice looking corolla!”
    The proportions are much much better on the optima vs the corolla.

  • avatar
    ex-dtw

    My ’01 Prelude is in dire need (66K) of said reach around and I am not looking forward to it.

    As for entering a Kia dealership, my wife and I were in one this past weekend. Before we entered, I warned her ‘Get ready for the high pressure pitch’. Sure enough, they wouldn’t let us leave without meeting the sales manager, ugh…

    The Sedona is a nice enough vehicle but I dread the thought of trying to craft a deal in that place.

  • avatar
    carguy

    I don’t get the point of the 2.7 V6 – its only marginally more powerful than the 2.4 i4 but adds weight and consumes way too much gas. Let’s face it, the Kia Optima is an automotive penalty box – 300cc more engine capacity will just make it cost more (and let’s fact it, money is the only reason to consider the Optima) and won’t make it any more fun – stick with the 2.4.

  • avatar
    Orian

    The 2.7 is an older Hyundai engine. The Optima and Sonota used to be more or less the same car until this last redesign. The Optima got its own platform and the Sonota went on with a new one of its own.

    My guess is the reason the 2.7 is offered is to not cannibalize sales of the new Sonota with the V6 since it is a newer engine (More powerful too).

    Their Beta engines (the 2.0 liter 4s) still require the timing belt change at 60k. They really need to upgrade that engine to stay competitive and eliminate the belt like their Japanese rivals have.

  • avatar
    pdub

    I have never understood why anyone cares what other people like or don’t like.

    Sherman Lin, why then do you care enough about what I like or do not like to respond?

    Yes, I do work at a domestic dealership, where we can sell Fusions for $3k more than imported Hyundais and Kias. That was my point.

    Before this I worked for a fleet company that retailed more vehicles to the general public than any company in the country. I began to dislike Toyota and Honda when people would call regularly just to ask if we had any Hondas and Toyotas (we did, incidentally). These callers didn’t even know what class or type of vehicle they were wanting, let alone the name of each line’s main models. They had just heard that Honda and Toyota made good cars. My coworkers and I at each got between 1-3 calls per day asking this absurdly general question, and many of these people would have hung up if we had said no. That’s blind loyalty.

    I don’t think Toyota or Honda are too worried about the Koreans. As I stated, Hyundai and Kia values still drop like rocks, and everyone knows it.

  • avatar
    BEAT

    I think it is typical for car springs to be change after 65,000 miles especially if you live around New England and the same with the timing belt if it is made of rubber, if it’s Chain I think you don’t have to change it.

    Why worry about the changing parts if it will take 100,000 miles before you have them change. Of course suspension is not part of the warranty it never did.

  • avatar
    tonycd

    Shaker and bfg9k have the basic idea about the lifters. This valvetrain doesn’t have adjustment screws, as other solid-lifter engines do. Instead, whenever it happens to drift far enough out of adjustment, the mechanic has to use a kit of about 40 different shimless, exact-thickness mechanical valve “adjusters” that aren’t adjustable, and which can probably be purchased only as a complete set. (The preceding sentence is edited slightly in deference to glenn126, who correctly notes that there aren’t any shims.) Installation then requires extensive disassembly. I respect a lot of what Hyundai and Kia have accomplished, but I find this particular engineering decision both odd and rather unconscionable.

    The 90K estimate is a wild-ass guess, possibly erring on the side of charity. As for causing a catastrophe, I suspect valve clearance misadjustment would announce itself quite adequately with gradually increasing clatter long before anything got destroyed.

    The 2.7 is a reworked version of Kia’s previous 2.7, with updates to make it similar in many ways to the Sonata’s 3.3. I believe Kia will go to the similar-architecture but much more powerful 3.3 when Optima production moves to the U.S., which is scheduled to happen in a couple of years.

    Chris G: Bottom line on whether I like the car? The base car, subject of most of this review, is a faceless transit capsule with nothing to have any feelings about. The V6 Appearance Package car (shown in our photos) with perforated leather, ESC, neon gauges and fat Michelins is fundamentally much more pleasing, and I’d consider buying it if it fit my own tall chassis better.

  • avatar
    glenn126

    The four cylinder engine in the Kia Optima is the Theta engine, as used in the new Hyundai Sonata (of which my wife leases a 2007).

    Here’s a Wikipedia article, which states what I already knew – the four cylinder has a chain cam drive.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyundai_Theta_engine

    The basic engine design is “shared” with Chrysler(i.e. Chrysler couldn’t be bothered/weren’t competent enough to design a decent four cylinder, so used then-partner Hyundai to design the basic engine). I also have unfortunate experience with my LAST Chrysler product, a Neon, in which the head gasket went – twice.

    The mechanical lifters on the Theta engine are described as shimless bucket tappets. The engine is intended to last 250,000 miles, according to engineering articles I read 2 years ago in Automotive News.

    Does anyone out there have a new Sonata or Optima owner’s manual, with service requirements? I don’t know if this engine requires valve adjustments ever.

    I personally think the Optima looks nicer than the Sonata, though I don’t like the McPherson strut system used in Optima, preferring the multi-link front suspension of the Sonata. The Sonata ride is much too “Buick like” for my taste, but it sure takes the (multiple, continuous) punch out of Michigan’s absolutely CRAP roads to some large extent.

    The Optima has those “Frua” shoulders just below the greenhouse, which I’ve always liked (since the 1960′s). Look at a mid 1960′s Maserati Quattroporte or Glas 1700 sedan from the same era (both styled by Frua of Italy) and you’ll kind of see what I mean…. Reminds me of a quality Italian bespoke suit…

    http://quattroporte.online.fr/qp1.htm

  • avatar
    glenn126

    Almost forgot to mention – it’s not just valve adjustments, but also cam belts.

    Our prior 2.7 litre V6 Sonata had to have it’s cam belt changed (at the cost of almost $500) at 60,000 miles. It did start getting “tappety” at 74,000 miles, to be honest, so I am not surprised to hear that it would have required a valve tappet adjustment at 90,000.

    Having had a 2.7 V6 AND the new 2.4 four cylinder, I’d buy the four banger every time. 20% more efficient, only down about 7 horsepower on the V6 – plus a more useable torque band.

    The only time the 2.7 V6 is “better” might – MIGHT – be high-speed passing. Certainly the V6 was rev-happy, and was a dog below about 3500 rpm. It was “too peaky” for a family sedan, in fact.

  • avatar
    mykeliam

    “My ‘01 Prelude is in dire need (66K) of said reach around and I am not looking forward to it.”

    I’ve had several Hondas that went to 100k before I had to replace the timing belt. I’ve had one break, and becuse of Honda’s engines TDC, it didn’t do any harm. Just replaced the belt, and off I went.

    But that’s why I’m a Honda loyalist. There ain’t too many domestics that could handle that kind of wear and tear, they simply aren’t designed to.

  • avatar
    shaker

    Yes, any engine with a belt-driven valvetrain that happens to be of an “interference” design (like an old Ford Escort that I once owned) is an accident waiting to happen; I could never figure why an automaker who gave a crap about the potential for bent valves/crunched pistons would not design such an engine with a cam chain.
    I noticed that the upcoming Saturn Astra 1.8 liter mill uses a belt; that in itself takes it off my “short list” (I own my cars a long time).

  • avatar
    Orian

    pdub,

    In Central Ohio Hyundai and some Kia’s are holding their values quite well – better than the domestics are in fact. Demand is oddly high for both brands in this area, and new dealerships are spreading out of the major metropolitan areas.

    They may not be as high in some areas, but that is changing with time.

  • avatar
    timbilly

    Kia hit this car just right. It looks exactly like the new WRX. Awesome!

    Oh, wait a minute…

  • avatar
    BuzzDog

    Hyundai resale values may not be stellar, but they are far, far better than in the mid- to late-1980s, when the brand first appeared on our shores. In the heartland of America – and I can only speak for the more populated area – the resale values are comparable with those of typical domestic sedans.

    Kia, on the other hand, seems to be positioned as the lower rung on the ladder of Korean auto brands. I’m sure there are exceptions, but whereas Hyundai dealers once heavily promoted “easy credit” deals, that torch seems to have been passed to Kia.

    At about the same time that Hyundai was preparing to pass this torch, Mitsubishi used a similar “no credit, zero down, perpetual financing” tactic to grow market share. Unfortunately, this was at a point where Mitsu’s products were not at their zenith of quality or desirability. The results, as many of you know, brought Mitsubishi’s auto concerns and its financing arm to its knees, as there were countless auto loans collateralized with nearly worthless vehicles. Years later, that marque is still struggling to rebuild its image, as well as its market share.

    Hopefully, Kia will avoid a similar mistake by making sure that their products are built to last.

  • avatar
    ex-dtw

    @ Mykeliam
    I’ve had several Hondas that went to 100k before I had to replace the timing belt. I’ve had one break, and becuse of Honda’s engines TDC, it didn’t do any harm. Just replaced the belt, and off I went.

    But that’s why I’m a Honda loyalist. There ain’t too many domestics that could handle that kind of wear and tear, they simply aren’t designed to.

    Please see Shakers response below yours. The Prelude is indeed an interference fit engine and therefore an “accident waiting to happen”. Now 60K might be early for this type of maintenance, but on my vehicle it is necessary nonetheless.

    Honda’s ARE great vehicles but that does not mean they might not make some compromises to satisfy a design. Interference fit engines are typically lower in profile and therefore allow the designer to reduce hood height. It seems that is the choice that Honda has made.

    Understanding the tradeoffs made in design on a model specific level is what I think we are discussing here. For some 90K might seem like eons away, for others, right around the corner.

    Pricing decisions work best when the most information is available, that’s all.

  • avatar

    Nice job pointing out the improvement made by the Appearance Package. That’s the version I drove, and I don’t think any car in this price range has as nice an interior.

  • avatar
    davey49

    Timing belts are smoother, quieter and don’t require an oil bath. Most cars now you change the belt at 100K and not 60. It also lets car makers make the engine more compact.
    The 2.7L V6 is fairly pointless either get the 2.4L 4 cylinder or buy a Sonata with the 3.3L V6.
    You have to make an engine interference now to get decent power/economy/emissions.

  • avatar
    Sajeev Mehta

    Understanding the tradeoffs made in design on a model specific level is what I think we are discussing here. For some 90K might seem like eons away, for others, right around the corner.

    Pricing decisions work best when the most information is available, that’s all.

    ex-dtw: very well said. Information (or misinformation) is what determines customer acceptance.

    I noticed a decline in timing belt’d motors after Ford and GM (Chrysler too?) heavily promoted their “100k between tune-ups” in the mid-late 1990s.

    Considering many people will gladly dump their ride once it hits the 6-digit mark, that’s a strong sales tool indeed.

  • avatar
    blowfish

    “My ‘01 Prelude is in dire need (66K) of said reach around and I am not looking forward to it.”

    I’ve had several Hondas that went to 100k before I had to replace the timing belt. I’ve had one break, and becuse of Honda’s engines TDC, it didn’t do any harm. Just replaced the belt, and off I went.

    Please check with the Honda dealer as what type of engine is yours, Interference type or NON.
    I had a 85 Civic 1500, the engine turned to be interference, I trusted a Heavy duty Mech who also works out of his home. It turned out the belt snapped costed me dearly a $200 tow , in the end I had to sell her cheap!


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